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Author: Subject: Does anyone know if these are made cheaper?
WeaponsRx
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[*] posted on 4-1-2015 at 01:48
Does anyone know if these are made cheaper?


I'm utilizing these adapters for buchner filtration apparatuses, so I can filter straight into a GL-45 threaded media bottle rather then a erlenmeyer flask, but each one is $100 a piece.... enough said right? Anyone seen such adapters for less??


thanks guys! Happy new year.
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g1ng3rbr34d_m4n
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[*] posted on 4-1-2015 at 19:47


Quote: Originally posted by WeaponsRx  
I'm utilizing these adapters for buchner filtration apparatuses, so I can filter straight into a GL-45 threaded media bottle rather then a erlenmeyer flask, but each one is $100 a piece.... enough said right? Anyone seen such adapters for less??


thanks guys! Happy new year.


So what does it do? Screw onto a threaded bottle and attach to the funnel? Is that protrusion a vacuum adapter?

Seems to me one could rig up something similar from PTFE plumbing/toilet/water pipe adapter, maybe even stainless. A T-junction with threaded ends so those screw on caps like the ones for garden hoses could be attached on the top and bottom, and some kind of a PTFE inlet screwed into the side...

You could even make it from steel and coat the inside with spray on PTFE...

Idk, just a couple thoughts off the top of my head.
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WeaponsRx
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[*] posted on 7-1-2015 at 18:17


yea its exactly as you interpreted, screws onto ay GL-45 media bottle, on top you slide in your buchner funnel, and the adapter has your side conical for vacuum... materials I could essentially jerry rig this out of I would feel comfortable running my filtrate through to be honest... but great idea if the filtrate was of a different nature for sure thank you.
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WeaponsRx
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[*] posted on 7-1-2015 at 18:18


hang on spray of PTFE huh? Not sure ive seen such a thing let me take a look. :cool:
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Chemosynthesis
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[*] posted on 8-1-2015 at 04:35


If you know anyone with a 3D printer, that should be easily made for much less than retail.
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WeaponsRx
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[*] posted on 18-1-2015 at 10:56


how would that work?
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Zombie
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[*] posted on 18-1-2015 at 11:27


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8aghzpO_UZE

Down side is it would cost about the same as what you have.

I would have to believe a Buchner w/ built in vacuum will solve your problem. Seal it w/ teflon tape perhaps. These are around 20-30.00 USD.

$(KGrHqJ,!nwFHg6j7sWdBR8Sm2cVyw~~60_57.JPG - 228kB

[Edited on 18-1-2015 by Zombie]




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Chemosynthesis
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[*] posted on 19-1-2015 at 10:23


Quote: Originally posted by WeaponsRx  
how would that work?

Disassemble all the pieces (unscrew from threading), then scan with a 3D laser scanner. Verify the scans in a mesh modeling program or CAD, then print in something like Taulman nylon with overhands utilizing a water soluble printing material. Leave in water. Reassemble parts.

I don't have a printer, but have seen it done. I have read that some office supply places like Staples of Office Depot offer printing services in 3D printers now.
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DrMario
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[*] posted on 20-1-2015 at 13:38


Quote: Originally posted by Chemosynthesis  
If you know anyone with a 3D printer, that should be easily made for much less than retail.
Except most commonly 3D printable materials are not very thermally or chemically stable. ABS, the most common 3D printable polymer, is easily attacked by most organic solvents. Also, it has a glass transition temperature of only about 100 C.

Some printers can handle nylon, which is, IMHO, the best 3D printable material for chemical applications, but it has an even lower glass transition temperature. Still, it doesn't get too soft at the GTT, so it kind of might work.

There are other 3D printing methods that would be actually very suitable for this application, but I am writing an article about this and I would like to publish it without disclosing any details on random fora.
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Chemosynthesis
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[*] posted on 20-1-2015 at 18:39


Interesting. I am assuming you 3D print. Maybe you could start a thread on it at some point in the future as I have been very interested in it since before it was accessible to all but automotive and aviation prototyping machines. I was under the impression most current 3D printers could handle nylon as Taulman claims to have designed their nylon products with RepRap and Makerbot style machines in mind. I had thought I read that those two machines dominated the market, but can't find anything definitive.

I haven't seen many people filter a hot solvent through an apparatus like that for what I presume to biological work (since the OP had asked about autoclave sterilizing filter paper), but it is worth stating thermal risks. I hadn't even considered that. I have seen the Taulman 618 glass transition temp listed at 49.4°C , and Taulman 645 at 68.2°C. Both had been advertised as "Chemically resistant to: Alcohols, Resins+MEK, Oils, Acetone, Most all Alkaline, most 2 part Casting Compounds." Those should be plenty good for 99% of the biochemically/medically related filtrations I have seen, but not necessarily synthesis. Zombie's suggestion of a fritted Buchner with vacuum attachment, sealed with a lathe-turned chemically resistant bung should be fairly inexpensive and durable.

I noticed that Taulman 680 and the high temperature industrially-oriented 910 are not yet released, but expect them to have a glass transition temperature above t-glase's 78°C.
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DrMario
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[*] posted on 21-1-2015 at 08:02


Let me reiterate something about nylon's GTT: it's generally fairly low (around 50C, as you could see yourself), but unlike ABS, it doesn't soften very quickly. And as I already said, nylon is handled by most extruders in circulation today (not all, but the great majority) so all in all, it's a viable option for a lot of chemical glassware fitting. I myself have 3D printed a lot of gas and liquid fittings from various 3D printable materials which I won't disclose, but yes, I did use nylon as well.

Currently I work with other 3D printing techniques, such as additive manufacturing and stereolythography. The former allows for some very interesting materials, the latter allows for high resolution, but material choice is super-limited.
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WeaponsRx
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[*] posted on 21-1-2015 at 10:48


Very interesting, if they are using Nylon then you'd think by now they'd have already have figured out how important it is and would be to get them printing with PTFE or Teflon right? come on now..... But Yea the only filters I can run are PTFE and PVDF unless I want the membrane as a part of the solution... Nylon is okay too, but yea that would indeed make my need for this adapter obsolete having the buchner with a side conical but I use a 2 piece Millipore buchner 47mm so i'd really just need to buy a new filter holder, one that has a conical but those on the other hand my friend are def. more then the adapter I speak of.... then i'd still need another adapter to be able to filter into a media bottle which is what I seek.
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Etaoin Shrdlu
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[*] posted on 22-1-2015 at 19:28


Quote: Originally posted by WeaponsRx  
Very interesting, if they are using Nylon then you'd think by now they'd have already have figured out how important it is and would be to get them printing with PTFE or Teflon right?

How do you propose to print with PTFE? It is not as easy as it sounds.
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WeaponsRx
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[*] posted on 23-1-2015 at 08:46


Yea well 2 years ago we said the same thing about 3d printers now didnt we.... I think its very easily possible if not already done... theres spray on polytetrafluoroethylene.... whats the issue?
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Chemosynthesis
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[*] posted on 23-1-2015 at 11:10


http://forums.reprap.org/read.php?1,65051,88570
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Etaoin Shrdlu
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[*] posted on 23-1-2015 at 12:33


The link Chemosynthesis posted explains why nicely. I found the mention of PVDF interesting; isn't this fluorocarbon fishing line? It is at least easy to acquire, though I don't know enough about 3D printing to guess whether processing into a usable form would be prohibitive (it's expensive, of course).

[Edited on 1-23-2015 by Etaoin Shrdlu]
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