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Author: Subject: Is this Iron Chlorate?
DFliyerz
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[*] posted on 12-1-2015 at 17:49
Is this Iron Chlorate?


I was trying to make sodium chlorate/perchlorate via electrolysis, but made the mistake of using a metal lid. I ended up with a whole ton of rust-looking stuff in the solution, except it doesn't look quite like rust. I'm thinking it's iron chlorate, but have no idea if it is; it's completely insoluble. Here's a picture:

IMG_1756.JPG - 1.8MB
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Molecular Manipulations
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[*] posted on 12-1-2015 at 17:55


It's rust.
I predict iron chlorate to be very soluble in water, but I don't have a ref.
Quote: Originally posted by DFliyerz  
I was trying to make sodium chlorate/perchlorate[..]

Which one? Don't try to make both a once.




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DFliyerz
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[*] posted on 12-1-2015 at 17:57


Quote: Originally posted by Molecular Manipulations  
It's rust.
I predict iron chlorate to be very soluble in water, but I don't have a ref.
Quote: Originally posted by DFliyerz  
I was trying to make sodium chlorate/perchlorate[..]

Which one? Don't try to make both a once.


I was starting with sodium chloride, which would (hopefully) progress to sodium chlorate and then perchlorate.
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Molecular Manipulations
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[*] posted on 12-1-2015 at 18:06


Well ideally you should make chlorate first, separately, then with a good amount of chloride still in solution, convert to perchlorate.



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Hawkguy
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[*] posted on 12-1-2015 at 18:11


Its prob just oxides of Iron mixed with precipitated Sodium salts. For Chorate/ Perchlorate electrolysis you really do need to do things in a planned out sorta way, with a more professional setup than other stuff when doing home chem. That means platinized anode, glass vessel, etc. Otherwise, it'll be a pain in the ass for you to separate your product aye
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jock88
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[*] posted on 12-1-2015 at 20:00



Have a look in this book for Iron Perchlorate

http://archive.org/stream/pwechloratesthei001740mbp/pwechlor...
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[*] posted on 18-1-2015 at 00:57


If you want iron chlorate: Try making Baruim Chlorate, and react it with Iron Sulfate ; this should precipitate Barium sulfate ... and leave Iron Chlorate in solution ... .
==> That should be the way of making also any other chlorate ; anyhow I wouldnt expect any chlorates to be safe for handling ... ; maybe some of them have the capability of spontaneous detonation by whatever reason ... ... , see the challenger-explosion of ammonium perchlorate ... ... , and the explosive properties of some metal salts ...
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[*] posted on 18-1-2015 at 02:57


It is almost certainly some kind of oxide, but if you want to test if it's a chlorate you could filter, dry, mix with a roughly equal amount of sugar and attempt to ignite it. If it is iron chlorate, it should burn.
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woelen
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[*] posted on 19-1-2015 at 04:56


The precipitate definitely is not iron chlorate, nor the perchlorate. All transition metal chlorates are soluble very well and the same is true for perchlorates.

Your precipitate most likely is plain hydrous iron(III) oxide, a.k.a. rust.




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