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Author: Subject: Magnesium sulfate as a substitute for Calcium Gluconate in dealing with HF?
BromicAcid
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[*] posted on 25-2-2015 at 14:31
Magnesium sulfate as a substitute for Calcium Gluconate in dealing with HF?


Over the years I have periodically saw the question come up:

Hey, how do I make / acquire calcium gluconate?

What follows is the usual "are you planning on making HF?" And then dragging it out of the poster that they are intending on working with HF. Here in the states calcium gluconate is considered a medication and is supposedly not available to be administered unless you are an emergency medical technician (EMT).

Anyway, the point of all of this is an alternate treatment method that I ran across today. Before I begin, note that this reference is from 1980, medicine is constantly evolving and there have been instances where older treatments were found to do more damage than good. I am presenting this because it offers an interesting alternative to the standard gluconate treatment, not as a guide on how to treat yourself for possible HF exposure. Put another way, I wouldn't bet my life on this so you shouldn't either. Nevertheless, if I did not have any other treatment on hand and I would die regardless I would give it a shot.

This reference is from the entry on Sulfur Tetrafluoride from the Matheson Gas Data Book 6th edition, it should be noted that in the prelude to this section it is pointed out that sulfur tetrafluoride hydrolyzes in the body and air to hydrogen fluoride and that treatments are designed to treat hydrogen fluoride exposure.

Quote:
<b>Skin Contact</b>

Anyone who has contact with sulfur tetrafluoride should be subjected immediately to a drenching in a shower of water. The clothing should be removed as rapidly as possible, even while the victim is in the shower, and medical assistance obtained at once. It is essential that the exposed area be washed with copious quantities of water for a sufficient period of time to remove all the sulfur tetrafluoride from the skin. The exposed areas of the skin should then be flushed with 2-3% aqueous ammonia, followed by liberal rinses with fresh water. After this, an ice cold saturated solution of magnesium sulfate (Epsom salt) in 70% alcohol should be applied for at least 30 minutes. If the burn is in an area that cannot be immersed, then the area should be treated with the iced alcohol or the iced magnesium sulfate solution by applying saturated compresses, which should be changed every two minutes. The physician should be available by then to administer further treatment. If the physician is not yet available, it is then permissible to apply a generous quantity of thick magnesia paste prepared from powdered magnesium oxide, U.S.P., and glycerin, U.S.P. Oils and greases should not be applied except under instructions from a physician.

Always have on hand a supply of magnesia paste.




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blogfast25
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[*] posted on 25-2-2015 at 14:48


Quote: Originally posted by BromicAcid  
What follows is the usual "are you planning on making HF?"


I've always wondered what became of your own efforts of preparing anh. HF?




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BromicAcid
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[*] posted on 25-2-2015 at 17:33


One of the many projects that vanished when I took the mantle of a professional chemist. As with others, my quest for anhydrous HF was merely a means to an end. If you remember, what I really wanted out of the deal was an electrochemical fluorine cell:

http://www.sciencemadness.org/talk/viewthread.php?tid=2358

In retrospect, that probably had the potential to go pretty badly.




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[*] posted on 25-2-2015 at 17:59


Yes, one could say that. Professional chemistry may have saved your life.

Thanks.




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