Sciencemadness Discussion Board
Not logged in [Login ]
Go To Bottom

Printable Version  
Author: Subject: From Scrap Wood To Test Tube Holder
m1tanker78
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 685
Registered: 5-1-2011
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 18-12-2015 at 20:21
From Scrap Wood To Test Tube Holder


I've used various wood / foam blocks with holes drilled to hold test tubes in the past. The problem is that most of the time test tube experiments are tiny scale and it's impossible to observe without removing the test tube from the block. I set out to turn a fence post (4" x 4") off-cut into a test tube holder where I can see the bottom of the test tubes without removing.

Scrap wood block from fence post:


Marked hole locations:


Began drilling holes on the drill press:


All holes drilled; ready to be cut down on table saw:


Completed test tube rack featuring calcium oxide powder, concentrated copper sulfate solution, and a wet copper powder cake:


I messed up on the corner holes. I was originally going to make a front and back set of holes only. Nevertheless, you can see the test tube contents are visible all the way to the bottom. The test tubes fit fairly snug -- no more leaning them on something where there's a good chance of tipping over.

Start to finish took about :30 minutes to complete. The faces can be cut with a box saw but will produce a lot of tearout.

[Edited on 12-19-2015 by m1tanker78]




Chemical CURIOSITY KILLED THE CATalyst.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
violet sin
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1388
Registered: 2-9-2012
Location: Back yard staring at stars
Member Is Offline

Mood: Good

[*] posted on 18-12-2015 at 21:42


Nice work. A half inch wide strip of copper sheet long enough to wrap around the cube and lap a bit, will make the corners functional and look cool. Also soft enough to be easily drilled and finish nailed in place. Or worked in what ever fashion you see fit to make it stay. Just a suggestion.

View user's profile View All Posts By User
j_sum1
Administrator
********




Posts: 5664
Registered: 4-10-2014
Location: Unmoved
Member Is Offline

Mood: juggling juggling juggling

[*] posted on 18-12-2015 at 21:56


I was thinking of updating mine. I might pinch some of your idea.

J.




View user's profile View All Posts By User
aga
Forum Drunkard
*****




Posts: 7030
Registered: 25-3-2014
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 18-12-2015 at 22:39


Good original thinking there m1tanker78.



View user's profile View All Posts By User
kecskesajt
National Hazard
****




Posts: 299
Registered: 7-12-2014
Location: Hungary
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 18-12-2015 at 23:10


Nice :)
Here, testtube holders can be 10$ or more based on material :O
View user's profile View All Posts By User
careysub
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1339
Registered: 4-8-2014
Location: Coastal Sage Scrub Biome
Member Is Offline

Mood: Lowest quantum state

[*] posted on 19-12-2015 at 08:56


You should varnish (polyurethane varnish is best for this, but anything is better than nothing) and not leave it bare wood.

Of course the cheapness of the project is compromised if you have to buy a can of varnish just for this.

I have a commercially made wood test tube stand that was unfinished, and it was getting water damaged and it absorbed any gunk spilled on it, making true clean-up questionable. After varnishing, no further damage, and wipe-up is easy.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Sulaiman
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 3221
Registered: 8-2-2015
Location: UK ... on extended Holiday in Malaysia
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 20-12-2015 at 04:44


I have used brush-on polyurethane varnish for my dual-burette/anything-that-fits stand
and so far it seems surprisingly chemical and stain resistant.
ideally several thin coats, or if lazy like me then one thin coat and one thick coat.
A small pot goes a long way.

Or paint it with whatever you can find then re-paint as required
or soak in boiling wax (not tried, sounds extremely messy)
or furniture or automotive wax or polish

View user's profile View All Posts By User
careysub
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1339
Registered: 4-8-2014
Location: Coastal Sage Scrub Biome
Member Is Offline

Mood: Lowest quantum state

[*] posted on 20-12-2015 at 08:12


Quote: Originally posted by Sulaiman  

or soak in boiling wax (not tried, sounds extremely messy)


The Forest Service has found that wax treatment of wood is the best water-proofing and preservative treatment available. They don't dip the wood in melted wax but use wax dissolved in mineral spirits.

I have used wax-dipping to protect chain mail and is not really that messy (people use it in heating baths after all). The stuff hardens again when cool, and can be easily removed from the dipping bowl and stored for reuse in a plastic bag.

If you did dip the wood though you would probably to give it a "heat treatment" in the oven on old newspaper (or something absorbent) at the lowest setting for a while to allow the wax to soak into the wood, and any excess wax to runoff to eliminate any wax on the surface.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
arkoma
Redneck Overlord
*******




Posts: 1575
Registered: 3-2-2014
Location: On a Big Blue Marble hurtling through space
Member Is Offline

Mood: ¡socialista!

[*] posted on 20-12-2015 at 08:16


This is a GREAT idea. I use wood for most everything. Condenser holder, sep funnel bracket yadda yaddda

*edit* NICE TABLE SAW, and luv them Irwin blades

[Edited on 12-20-2015 by arkoma]





Quote:
“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one’s lifetime.”

and..

“The gentle reader will never, never know what a consummate ass he can become until he goes abroad.”

Mark Twain, The Innocents Abroad

View user's profile View All Posts By User
m1tanker78
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 685
Registered: 5-1-2011
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 20-12-2015 at 18:42


Good suggestions. I have some polyurethane but didn't apply because I needed to use the rack that evening to mildly heat some test tubes. Luckily nothing spilled or spattered so I'll take the hints and brush on a couple of light coats of PU. There's a lot of naked end grain on this piece.

Quote:
The Forest Service has found that wax treatment of wood is the best water-proofing and preservative treatment available. They don't dip the wood in melted wax but use wax dissolved in mineral spirits.
That's interesting, I'll have to try that sometime. With the right solvent, it should be safe to use on cutting boards along with good old mineral oil.

Arkoma, I was hesitant to dish out the money for the Irwin blade but am glad I did. They make very clean cuts and last a long time (had this blade ~3 years or so). If you can, post a pic of your sep funnel bracket. I'd love to see it.




Chemical CURIOSITY KILLED THE CATalyst.
View user's profile View All Posts By User

  Go To Top