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Author: Subject: How to distinguish the name :Calcium Nitrate ; Calcium Ammonium Nitrate (CAN) and Granular CAN ?
celia1095
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[*] posted on 21-4-2016 at 07:38
How to distinguish the name :Calcium Nitrate ; Calcium Ammonium Nitrate (CAN) and Granular CAN ?


How to distinguish the name :Calcium Nitrate ; Calcium Ammonium Nitrate (CAN) and Granular CAN ?

Sometimes people said Calcium Nitrate,but exactly they mean Calcium Ammonium Nitrate (CAN) .

Very confused. anyone know ?

Thanks

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PHILOU Zrealone
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[*] posted on 21-4-2016 at 09:57


Calcium Nitrate is simply Ca(NO3)2 eventually with water of crystalisation.

Calcium Ammonium Nitrate (CAN) or Granular CAN is simply a mix of NH4NO3 and Ca(NO3)2 (eventually with water of crystalisation)

I guess that you may find the difference on the label by the % nitrogen (N) vs amount of Ca...
CAN must be richer at N since NH4NO3 contains 2 N atoms per molecule...




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BromicAcid
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[*] posted on 21-4-2016 at 14:33


Of course when you say CAN I think of Cerric Ammonium Nitrate which in my circles is the most common use for that abbreviation. Unfortunately you have to sometimes infer the identity of a chemical from the context but it SHOULD be identified somewhere before the acronym is employed. In a book this might be just before the introduction in a table or it could be interwoven in the text.



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hissingnoise
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[*] posted on 22-4-2016 at 00:27


Quote:
Of course when you say CAN I think of Cerric[sic] Ammonium Nitrate which in my circles is the most common use for that abbreviation.

Just not common enough, apparently? :D

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PHILOU Zrealone
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[*] posted on 25-4-2016 at 07:36


YES WE CAN! (B.Obama) ;) :D :P



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[*] posted on 27-4-2016 at 18:00


Quote: Originally posted by PHILOU Zrealone  


Calcium Ammonium Nitrate (CAN) or Granular CAN is simply a mix of NH4NO3 and Ca(NO3)2 (eventually with water of crystalisation)


CAN can also be AN mixed with Lime

ammonium nitrate-based fertilisers with dolomite, limestone, and/or calcium carbonate

http://www.yara.co.nz/crop-nutrition/products/yarabela/7660-...

usually around 70-<80% AN to avoid additional regulations around ammonium nitrate storage in some countries.

NPK wont help as the ratio can vary depending on brand.

If in doubt find the MSDS



[Edited on 28-4-2016 by feacetech]
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[*] posted on 28-4-2016 at 05:25


Add sodium carbonate to its solution to see if CaCO3 precipitates
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RogueRose
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[*] posted on 28-4-2016 at 19:41


I have come CalNit 15.5-0-0 and IDK what it is.. It is manufactured by Yaris. When dissolved in water, filtered, then boiled to evap an ammonia smell eminates from it. After a complete dissolve and recrystalization to anhydrous form, a VERY pungent ammonia smell is present when KOH is added to it. If the 2 compounds are mixed dry, it will hiss, get hot and emit very strong ammonia smell.

So, I don't know if this is truly Ca(NO3)2 or what.
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hissingnoise
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[*] posted on 29-4-2016 at 00:47


Quote:
If the 2 compounds are mixed dry, it will hiss, get hot and emit very strong ammonia smell.

Ammonium nitrate releases small amounts of ammonia in boiling water and KOH being very hygroscopic reacts because it retains moisture!

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yobbo II
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[*] posted on 29-4-2016 at 03:49



http://www.yara.us/us-safety-data-sheets/agriculture-data-sh...
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hissingnoise
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[*] posted on 29-4-2016 at 04:40


Yara, a major international company that likely wouldn't exist were it not for the Birkeland Eyde NO2 generator!

Their UnikaKali fert. is KNO3, BTW!

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