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Author: Subject: Is K-40 ever enriched ?
metalresearcher
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[*] posted on 21-6-2016 at 11:02
Is K-40 ever enriched ?


One in 8600 parts of K is K-40 which is radioactive and even more than U-235. Due to its abundancy, K-40 is the most abundant source of background radiation in nature.

But is it ever enriched ?
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careysub
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[*] posted on 21-6-2016 at 11:25


Quote: Originally posted by metalresearcher  
One in 8600 parts of K is K-40 which is radioactive and even more than U-235. Due to its abundancy, K-40 is the most abundant source of background radiation in nature.

But is it ever enriched ?


Sure:
https://www.isotopes.gov/catalog/product.php?element=Potassi...

Oak Ridge isotope sales used to list prices for the isotopes they prepare (using Calutron technology mostly) but now you have to ask for quotes for everything.
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neptunium
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[*] posted on 22-6-2016 at 03:25


Some chemical reaction favor one isotope or another.. Given how easy it is to access KOH for example it shouldn't be overly difficult .
But why K40? It has petty penetrating gamma why would you want to concentrate it? Just for curiosity?




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blogfast25
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[*] posted on 22-6-2016 at 10:29


Quote: Originally posted by neptunium  
Some chemical reaction favor one isotope or another.. Given how easy it is to access KOH for example it shouldn't be overly difficult .


The differences in chemical properties of isotopes of the same element ar vanishingly small. Which is why mostly physical separation is used, based on small AW differences.

If you have any references on chemical separation of K-40 I'd be interested in seeing them. :)

[Edited on 22-6-2016 by blogfast25]




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unionised
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[*] posted on 22-6-2016 at 11:06


This was the first one I found by googling potassium " isotope effect.

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1023%2FB%3AJRNC.00000117...
there are stacks.
Of course, the effect isn't very big...
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blogfast25
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[*] posted on 22-6-2016 at 17:34


Quote: Originally posted by unionised  
This was the first one I found by googling potassium " isotope effect.

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1023%2FB%3AJRNC.00000117...
there are stacks.
Of course, the effect isn't very big...


Ok, thanks.




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Morgan
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[*] posted on 22-6-2016 at 19:08


Here's a tidbit on potassium 41 concentration although not the topic at hand.
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1023%2FA%3A1024913110182...
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