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Author: Subject: Manganese oxide brilliant blue
Morgan
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[*] posted on 29-6-2016 at 16:23
Manganese oxide brilliant blue


Old news but colorful

"OSU chemist Mas Subramanian and his team were experimenting with new materials that could be used in electronics applications and they mixed manganese oxide – which is black in color – with other chemicals and heated them in a furnace to nearly 2,000 degrees Fahrenheit. One of their samples turned out to be a vivid blue. Oregon State graduate student Andrew Smith initially made these samples to study their electrical properties."
http://oregonstate.edu/ua/ncs/archives/2015/may/licensing-ag...

https://news.artnet.com/art-world/yinmn-blue-to-be-sold-comm...
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-3665985/A-dee...
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hyfalcon
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[*] posted on 30-6-2016 at 04:35


I would be interested in the patent they filed on that one. We've got manganese staining in the hills around my valley that is absolutely black. Bake some samples in my heat treating furnace see if I turn them blue.
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BromicAcid
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[*] posted on 30-6-2016 at 05:04


I love the name they are marketing/discussing it under, YInMn blue, a name that certainly appeals to the chemists out there. I am looking forward to getting some of this pigment (which is already commercially available) and doing some painting with it,



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j_sum1
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[*] posted on 30-6-2016 at 06:10


YInMn
Does that mean it contains yttrium and indium?


edit

yes.

[Edited on 30-6-2016 by j_sum1]




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crystal grower
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[*] posted on 30-6-2016 at 06:14


Quote: Originally posted by j_sum1  
YInMn
Does that mean it contains yttrium and indium?

I have interpreted it in this way too, but Im not sure.
(If yes, It could teoretically be a good source of Y, In for an element collection :)).



[Edited on 30-6-2016 by crystal grower]




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PHILOU Zrealone
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[*] posted on 30-6-2016 at 14:32


Quote: Originally posted by crystal grower  
Quote: Originally posted by j_sum1  
YInMn
Does that mean it contains yttrium and indium?

I have interpreted it in this way too, but Im not sure.
(If yes, It could teoretically be a good source of Y, In for an element collection :)).

No need to interprete...as explained into the links provided by the OP...it is indeed a mix of Y, In and Mn oxydes...




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violet sin
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[*] posted on 30-6-2016 at 16:08


I looked fruitlessly for 45 min or so last night, trying to find a patent or scientific article on its manufacturing process. Kinda bummed, blue is my favoritd color. As a matter of fact I bought blue spray enamel yesterday to mark all my tools so they dont walk of the job site.

Kinda figured with the novel electronic properties and crystal structure, there would be resources available. Maybe I should widen my search parameters, including those terms.. duhh. Regardless, i find it interesting.





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Morgan
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[*] posted on 30-6-2016 at 18:18


A few other tidbits maybe of interest.
"Subramanian has added zinc and titanium to produce a range of purples. He and his team have substituted iron for manganese to produce a new orange pigment, and they are exploring the use of copper and titanium to make green. Other elements produce yellows and browns."
“We are making new pigments based on a mineral called hibonite, which is normally found in meteorites,” Subramanian says. “They are blue sometimes, and we are now producing them in our laboratory furnace using cheap raw materials.”
http://oregonstate.edu/terra/2014/10/accidentally-blue/
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wg48
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[*] posted on 30-6-2016 at 19:34


Here is some better detail about the compound, yttrium indium oxide can hardly be described as cheap I guess that's bull for investors.

www.rsc.org/chemistryworld/2012/09/yr-pigment-paint-chemistr...

From the above link: "So the identification of a new inorganic blue pigment in 2009 looked very promising. Mas Subramanian and coworkers at Oregon State University, US, found that manganese ions produce an intense blue colour, with the prized ‘reddish’ shade of ultramarine, when they occupy a trigonal bipyramidal site in metal oxides. The researchers substituted Mn3+ for some indium ions in yttrium indium oxide, forming a solid solution of YInO3 and YMnO3, which has a blue colour even though the two oxides themselves are white and black, respectively. The depth of the colour varies from pale blue to virtually black as the manganese content is increased. Inserting manganese into other metal oxides with the same coordination geometry also offers strong blues. Meanwhile, similar substitutions of iron(iii) and copper(ii) generate bright orange and green pigments. Those are traditionally less problematic, however, and while the materials may prove to have useful magnetic properties, it’s the blue that has attracted colour manufacturers."
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violet sin
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[*] posted on 1-7-2016 at 00:39


Hey thanks for that guys. Got some new info and hints for future free time searches



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