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Author: Subject: Weighing paper substitute
law
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[*] posted on 10-7-2016 at 17:51
Weighing paper substitute


hey guys, do you know a good substitute for weighing paper that can be found in the kitchen? I was thinking about parchment paper but I'm not sure if it's a good idea
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halogen
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[*] posted on 10-7-2016 at 18:20


why not? are you weighing something corrosive?



F. de Lalande and M. Prud'homme showed that a mixture of boric oxide and sodium chloride is decomposed in a stream of dry air or oxygen at a red heat with the evolution of chlorine.
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Volanschemia
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[*] posted on 10-7-2016 at 19:13


Paper muffin holders work well. They have a wax layer usually as well.



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law
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[*] posted on 10-7-2016 at 19:48


Quote: Originally posted by halogen  
why not? are you weighing something corrosive?


I have lots of chemicals to work around with (more than 60) and most are in powder form. And I was just wondering if the parchment paper can do the job or if there is something in it that may alter the final result of an experiment

[Edited on 7-11-2016 by law]
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law
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[*] posted on 10-7-2016 at 19:52


Quote: Originally posted by Volanschemia  
Paper muffin holders work well. They have a wax layer usually as well.


That's a good one for large quantities
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Artemus Gordon
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[*] posted on 11-7-2016 at 14:48


I use pieces off a roll of waxed paper from the supermarket. I suppose tiny flakes of parrafin wax could fall off, but not enough to worry me, and the smooth surface helps the chemicals to slide off cleanly. I suspect parchment would hold on to more particles of the chemicals.
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Artemus Gordon
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[*] posted on 11-7-2016 at 14:54


I imagine butcher paper would also be good, since it is paper on one side and smooth plastic on the other.
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macckone
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[*] posted on 11-7-2016 at 19:15


Report covers are good. Nice smooth plastic that is generally nonreactive.
regular printer paper is also good.
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feacetech
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[*] posted on 11-7-2016 at 19:29


why not get some weighing boats and or watch glasses?

if you chemicals are un reactive you could use foil tart dishes
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highpower48
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[*] posted on 12-7-2016 at 09:27


Freezer paper
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