Sciencemadness Discussion Board
Not logged in [Login ]
Go To Bottom

Printable Version  
Author: Subject: Mercury(II) nitrate volatility
Bonee
Harmless
*




Posts: 26
Registered: 20-12-2010
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 10-8-2016 at 23:54
Mercury(II) nitrate volatility


I know mercury nitrate sublimes when concentrated under heating, but in practicality how much is it a hazard inhalation wise if it is dissolved in a lot of cold water?
View user's profile View All Posts By User
woelen
Super Administrator
*********




Posts: 7738
Registered: 20-8-2005
Location: Netherlands
Member Is Offline

Mood: interested

[*] posted on 11-8-2016 at 01:57


The risk is none. A cold solution of mercury(II) nitrate does not give any dangerous vapors.
Of course, when you handle the dry solid, there is a small risk. The solid can form dust, which can be inhaled. By working carefully and cleanly, the risk of inhaling dust can be minimized.

Btw, a solution of mercury(II) nitrate in water is not clear. You need to add some nitric acid to have a clear solution, otherwise you get hydrolysed species, like HgO.xH2O and basic nitrates, which do not dissolve well.




The art of wondering makes life worth living...
Want to wonder? Look at https://woelen.homescience.net
View user's profile Visit user's homepage View All Posts By User
Deathunter88
National Hazard
****




Posts: 479
Registered: 20-2-2015
Location: Beijing, China
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 11-8-2016 at 02:09


Does solid mercury(II) nitrate sublimate as well? I was only aware that solid mercury(II) chloride could sublimate at STP.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
woelen
Super Administrator
*********




Posts: 7738
Registered: 20-8-2005
Location: Netherlands
Member Is Offline

Mood: interested

[*] posted on 11-8-2016 at 02:41


No, solid mercury(II) nitrate does not sublimate, at least not noticeably. It is an ionic compound and hence cannot easily sublimate. Mercury(II) chloride is covalent and that is the reason that it can sublimate more easily.



The art of wondering makes life worth living...
Want to wonder? Look at https://woelen.homescience.net
View user's profile Visit user's homepage View All Posts By User
hissingnoise
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 3940
Registered: 26-12-2002
Member Is Offline

Mood: Pulverulescent!

[*] posted on 11-8-2016 at 04:30


A solid substance sublimes and the deposited solid is the sublimate!

When will people learn?

View user's profile View All Posts By User
Bonee
Harmless
*




Posts: 26
Registered: 20-12-2010
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 11-8-2016 at 06:45


Quote: Originally posted by woelen  
The risk is none. A cold solution of mercury(II) nitrate does not give any dangerous vapors.
Of course, when you handle the dry solid, there is a small risk. The solid can form dust, which can be inhaled. By working carefully and cleanly, the risk of inhaling dust can be minimized.

Btw, a solution of mercury(II) nitrate in water is not clear. You need to add some nitric acid to have a clear solution, otherwise you get hydrolysed species, like HgO.xH2O and basic nitrates, which do not dissolve well.


Thank you for reply and my bad, of course the solution contains HNO3 as well.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Deathunter88
National Hazard
****




Posts: 479
Registered: 20-2-2015
Location: Beijing, China
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 11-8-2016 at 07:51


Quote: Originally posted by hissingnoise  
A solid substance sublimes and the deposited solid is the sublimate!

When will people learn?



When I look up "sublimate" on the Apple dictionary, it says "verb, another term for sublime" so I think its OK.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Texium
Administrator
Thread Moved
23-8-2016 at 08:23

  Go To Top