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Morgan
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[*] posted on 27-9-2016 at 04:39
A Possible Case for Wearing Natural Fibers


"The impact of microplastic pollution is not fully understood but studies have suggested that it has the potential to poison the food chain, build up in animals’ digestive tracts, reduce the ability of some organisms to absorb energy from foods in the normal way and even to change the behaviour of crabs."
https://www.theguardian.com/science/2016/sep/27/washing-clot...

[Edited on 27-9-2016 by Morgan]
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[*] posted on 30-9-2016 at 06:24


"Despite microfibres being the majority of microplastic pollution40,41, including in the deep-sea25,35, most feeding experiments that have been undertaken thus far use microbeads and plastic shavings, with a few exceptions, Hämer, et al.42, Watts, et al.27, Au, et al.43. Our study shows for the first time that deep-sea organisms are ingesting microfibres in a natural setting, thus we suggest that experimental designs using fibres are needed to determine the potential long-term impact of microplastics for both shallow and deep marine organisms."

"The range of plastic microfibres found ingested/internalised by organisms studied here included modified acrylic, polypropylene, viscose, polyester, and acrylic. Polypropylene has been found to adsorb PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls), nonylphenol and DDE, an organochlorine pesticide7. Polyethylene, a type of polyolefin fibre whose chemical composition in part is the basis of some polyester fibres (e.g. polyethylene terephthalate), has been found to adsorb four times more PCBs than polypropylene44. Polypropylene has also been found to adsorb a range of metals in a marine environment; the concentrations of most of these metals did not saturate over a year period suggesting plastics in the oceans for long time periods accumulate greater concentrations of metals."
Plastic microfibre ingestion by deep-sea organisms
http://www.nature.com/articles/srep33997
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[*] posted on 11-11-2016 at 09:58


One could make an argument (and counter-argument) on the 'benefit' of natural fibers by examining the atmospheric damage involved in producing the respective natural and synthetic fibers.

Unfortunately, anything grown in nitrate enriched soil already has a negative footprint!

So, I am not sure if the advocates of natural fibers will find the results 'fitting' well with preconceived biases.

[Edited on 11-11-2016 by AJKOER]
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[*] posted on 11-11-2016 at 11:08


I'm always hearing that a high fiber diet is GOOD for you.

This way soon ALL food will be high in fiber. Even the fish!
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[*] posted on 11-11-2016 at 15:25


http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/plastic-microbeads-bann...

Plastic microbeads are being banned from some products.
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[*] posted on 11-11-2016 at 16:34


One thing I don't like about some synthetic fibers is the amount of static they produce. It's like you become a high voltage device when taking off a jacket or that amazing effect of lifting the covers at night to reveal a crackling light show. I wonder if you become a Swiffer electrostatic dust magnet? And I don't like they way synthetic fibers hang or drape unnaturally on a person. And the prilling, and the scritchy sound a synthetic jacket makes when moving in the least. Often synthetic fibers are uncomfortable to wear. Or the chemical smell from drying a synthetic blanket in the dryer on anything more than a delicate heat setting. Some synthetics make a lot of dryer lint and dust as well, although cotton flannel will do the same, a blizzard of particles quite visible in sunlight. Synthetic fibers often melt easily. And so much of this stuff is made in China now. Here's some thoughts not 100% accurate but points to ponder.

"Expensive clothing may seem overpriced, but the quality of the raw materials is superior, and the fibers can be woven into beautiful fabrics that are soft and strong, requiring little chemical processing to make them suitable for you, the consumer. They also last you for years so are a wise purchase in the long run."

"Keep in mind that many fabrics (including natural fibers) undergo significant processing that often involves:"
Detergents
Petrochemical dyes
Formaldehyde to prevent shrinkage
Volatile organic compounds (VOCs)
Dioxin-producing bleach
Chemical fabric softeners
http://bodyecology.com/articles/top_6_fabrics_you_should_avo...

National Geographic article and video
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2016/11/animals-eat-ocean...

I've started to like things made with linen, mostly shirts. Here's a point about simple things.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rXpVABq5qfI
This is a bit flowery, but it has some truth to it.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sVzbb2gcWEE

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ZrZZefkohE#t=8m44s

I watched this whole series, it's really kind of an art and science.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2mz-646uzko

After separating the short fibers which are used for other things, look how much/little of the long fibers you get from a quarter of an acre of land.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WOpETzPmH8A#t=4m42s

[Edited on 12-11-2016 by Morgan]
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[*] posted on 15-11-2016 at 18:34


Cotton, Baby! The world's foremost luxury fabric. Love you long time.
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[*] posted on 15-11-2016 at 19:16


Quote: Originally posted by zed  
Cotton, Baby! The world's foremost luxury fabric. Love you long time.


It seems all cotton is a rarity in the typical American malls today. And sometimes if it is all cotton it's so thin and doesn't hang well. It's sad so many of our clothes are made in China by slave labor. But there's nothing wrong with cotton.
Holiday shopping at The Sad Old Mall.
http://abc.go.com/shows/jimmy-kimmel-live/video/featured/VDK...

A good documentary following the life of a likable young girl making jeans and getting ripped off by her employer at every turn. If you can hang with it, you'll see a lot of things come to light, maybe things you wouldn't have thought of.
"China Blue (2006) is a powerful and poignant journey into the harsh world of sweatshop workers. Shot clandestinely, this is a deep-access account of what both China and the international retailers don't want us to see: how the clothes we buy are actually made." (88 minutes)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Y8xEMDlsyU#t=5m53s


[Edited on 16-11-2016 by Morgan]
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[*] posted on 15-11-2016 at 21:23


I recently read an article about brominated azo dyes as mutagenic contaminants in home environments:
https://cen.acs.org/articles/94/web/2016/11/Bromine-containi...

Thus, clothes dyed with these compounds should be avoided.




As below, so above.
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[*] posted on 16-11-2016 at 05:51


Odd tidbit
Synthetic Clothes Off Limits to Marines Outside Bases in Iraq
http://archive.defense.gov/news/newsarticle.aspx?id=15478
http://www.snewsnet.com/news/news-of-marine-ban-on-synthetic...

A few of the comments were informative.
"There’s a huge need for truly chemical free clothing. My blog gets thousands of hits every year from people all over the world who are searching for it. Even organic cotton clothing (and bedding) can be toxic if regular dyes and finishes are used. It’s not just formaldehyde! Sometimes the chemicals can be washed out, but other times they are permanently embedded. And washing the toxic stuff just pollutes those who live downstream… little fishies, frogs, and oops, us too! We have to drink that water! Municipal systems were not designed to remove all the toxic chemicals we dump into the water… We really need truly non-toxic, chemical free clothing!"
http://www.davidsuzuki.org/blogs/queen-of-green/2014/04/how-...

If you read down some there's actually quite a bit of information on the chemical process and chemicals that go into making these fabrics do their thing.
http://organicclothing.blogs.com/my_weblog/2009/01/permanent...

[Edited on 16-11-2016 by Morgan]
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[*] posted on 21-11-2016 at 07:13


Those luxury Egyptian cotton sheets you own may not be luxurious – or Egyptian
https://www.theguardian.com/sustainable-business/2016/nov/19...

"This year, a handful of retailers started selling cotton that had been marked with a DNA tagging system, similar to what’s been done with olive oil, Super Bowl footballs, and fine art. The technology, developed by Applied DNA Sciences, uses tiny genetic markers that are sprayed on the cotton at the gin just before being packaged and sent to be turned into yarn. The markers bind to the plant’s fibers and act as a microscopic bar code that can be tracked throughout the production process, which can involve more than seven steps in as many countries. At each stop on that journey, samples are collected and sent to Applied DNA Sciences’ lab for testing to ensure the DNA tags are still there and another cotton hasn’t been substituted."
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-09-22/dna-testin...
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[*] posted on 21-11-2016 at 09:00


Natural fibers tend not to melt onto your skin in a fireworks accident, wool and cotton are also pretty much self extinguishing.

So I wear a lot of cotton at work, and some wool.

Plus, I hate that static thing from the synthetics, as do some of our igniters...




Boom.
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It was the sort of thing you expected in the Street of alchemists. The neighbors preferred explosions, which were at least identifiable and soon over. They were better than the smells, which crept up on you.
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[*] posted on 21-11-2016 at 17:53


But Nomex is great stuff for working around fire and works. But I have seen way too many people wearing synthetics while handling dangerous chemicals or working with flammables. The newest Under Armour shirts have big labels saying to keep them away from fires, likely due to campfire and kitchen incidents.
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[*] posted on 21-11-2016 at 19:17


There're a sea of synthetics in the stores today, especially sporting goods stores that sell Under Armour.

Congratulations! You have selected a garment made of Nomex®!
Ease of wash and care.
Launder Nomex® garments separately from other garments.
Tumble dry garments at low temperature settings or hang dry away from any light source.
Store Nomex® garments away from any light source.
http://www2.dupont.com/Public_Sector_ER/en_GB/Nomex_key_Bene...

I couldn't find out what the anti-static fibers are made of.

Nomex is the main component of many protective textiles bearing his name, including:
Nomex IIIA 2 (Nomex Comfort 3 ): 93% Nomex, Kevlar 5%, 2% antistatic fibers;
Nomex Tough ( armor serge ) and Nomex Twin (special armor): 75% Nomex, 23% Kevlar, 2% antistatic fiber 3 .
https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nomex

"Aromatic polyamides such as Nomex are often called aramids for short. Kevlar® (another DuPont textile) is also an aramid, but with a slightly different chemical structure. If you're interested, the full chemical name of Nomex is poly (m-phenylenediamine isophthalamide), while Kevlar is poly (p-phenylenediamine terephthalamide); Nomex is a meta-aramid polymer while Kevlar is a para-aramid polymer."
http://www.explainthatstuff.com/nomex.html

"Type 462 staple of NOMEX® is a blend of NOMEX®
and KEVLAR® brand fibers and P-140, a proprietary
static dissipative fiber."

"Where indoor storage is used, incandescent lighting is
preferable to fluorescent lighting because the UV
component of incandescent light in the 360-nanometer
range of the spectrum is significantly less intense. Storage
near windows should be avoided because the 360-
nanometer range of the spectrum exceeds the point at
which common window glass absorbs most UV radiation."

"The fiber contains up to 12% moisture (depending upon
storage and use conditions) and a small amount of residual
dimethylacetamide (DMAC) from the manufacturing
process. Surface coatings of lubricating and antistatic
agents, and additives designed to enhance specific product
performance, such as coloring agents and ultraviolet light
blockers, may also be present. These additives are tightly
bound within the substrate and do not present any known
hazardous exposure in handling or use."

"As produced and shipped by DuPont, NOMEX® contains
finish and moisture, and neither these components, nor the
fiber itself, have been observed to cause sensitization in
human skin tests. There is, however, potential for
sensitization as a result of the application of other additives
applied to fabrics or garments of NOMEX® during the
manufacturing or laundering processes.
Infrequent cases of skin irritation have appeared in the
initial wearings of garments of NOMEX®. The
mechanical action of wearing a stiff, unwashed fabric
can cause irritation in areas where there is restricted
movement, such as at clothing binding points, thick
seams and unfinished edges. DuPont recommends
washing a garment at least once prior to wearing. This
will remove stiffeners that are applied by fabric mills for
ease of handling in garment manufacturing."
http://www.nakedwhiz.com/gasketsafety/nomextechnicalguide.pd...

"Based on over 30 years of experience in commercial use and extensive toxicological testing, NOMEX® fiber products present minimal risk to human health and the environment."

"NOMEX® fiber is a creamy white yarn, staple, or floc that may be blended with similar forms of gold-colored KEVLAR® brand fiber. As-shipped these products pose no immediate hazard. Processing and handling can produce airborne respirable KEVLAR® fibrils (subfibers.) Animal studies indicate that prolonged overexposure to such fibrils has the potential to cause lasting lung damage. Use ventilation or a respirator to minimize fibril inhalation."

"NOMEX® aramid fibers of 2 denier per filament contain 0-2% dimethylacetamide (DMAc.) Heavier fibers may contain up to 3% DMAc. Processing and handling may result in exposure via skin absorption and inhalation. Prolonged and repeated overexposure to DMAc can cause liver damage. Wash hands after handling. Avoid exposure to hot processing in confined spaces. Use adequate ventilation. Industrial experience shows that minimal absorption of DMAc occurs from room temperature handling of NOMEX®. DMAc can be released by heating above 200C or by extracting with liquids, especially during dyeing."
http://hazard.com/msds/mf/dupont/nomex.html

[Edited on 22-11-2016 by Morgan]
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[*] posted on 21-11-2016 at 20:44


Quote: Originally posted by Dr.Bob  
But Nomex is great stuff for working around fire and works.


Nomex is desgned for people working around naturally aspirated fires of liquid fuels and general machinery/structural materials. Not very HOT fires, in the scheme of things.

Fireworks stars, particularly metal fueled ones, BURN RIGHT THROUGH NOMEX. FAST. And if those stars are going 300 fps or more, they PUNCH right through the Nomex, it is NOT Kevlar body armor either...

I have seen a number of neophyte pyros hapily putting on Nomex jumpsuits like it was a magic flak jacket. It is not... The holes in that pretty orange jumpsuit soon educate them.

Myself, I own a bee keeper's coverall. Imagine a nice big poofy oversized white jumpsuit that closes pretty tight at all openings, made out of 100% cotton, and thick enough fabric to stop a bee stinger (about like heavy denim blue jean material).

[Edited on 22-11-2016 by Bert]




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It was the sort of thing you expected in the Street of alchemists. The neighbors preferred explosions, which were at least identifiable and soon over. They were better than the smells, which crept up on you.
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Morgan
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[*] posted on 22-11-2016 at 07:56


Here's something about the proprietary anti-static fibers in some kinds of Nomex.

"composition is 93%Nomex,5%kevlar and 2% P140 ( anti-static fiber),the fiber is from Dupont,we are the exclusive partner of Dupont Nomex in China."
http://www.textile-product.com/Nomex-Kevlar-Anti-static-fabr...

"NVISTA® T420A is the only nylon fiber blend specifically engineered to be combined with cotton for higher durability and to dissipate fabric to fabric and fabric to surface static. The carbon core of the P140 fiber gives the INVISTA® T420A fiber blend its inherent static dissipative properties. Further, the P140 fibers provide inherent static dissipation that perform through wear, laundry, and even in low humidity environments."
"The P140 carbon core in the CORDURA® fabrics with T420A dissipate static through induction – the most effective form of static dissipation. Static charges on the fabric create opposite charges on the P140 carbon core fibers. When the charges on the carbon core build to a high enough energy level, air molecules around the carbon core are ionized. Air ions neutralize static charges on the fabric and thus dissipate static."
http://www.cordura.com/en/press-releases/news_NYCO_P140_laun...

Lots of Nomex shirts on eBay.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Oceanside-Fire-Dept-Calif-Nomex-Unif...

This one says in the shirt collar to read warning label before wearing or washing.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Flame-Resistant-Fr-Men-Nomex-IIIA-Kh...
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[*] posted on 22-11-2016 at 17:59


Well, I'm having trouble finding 100% Cotton socks. Stuff out of Pakistan (Where many textiles originate) always seems to be loaded with Polyester.

To my way of thinking, that Polyester, is in fact, spun from old pop-bottles.

And, I'm gonna check on that right now.

Yup! My suspicion proved true, so true.

Old pop-bottles are cheaper than cotton.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zyF9MxlcItw

Grrrr.

[Edited on 23-11-2016 by zed]
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[*] posted on 22-11-2016 at 19:46


Some comments from the bottles to polyester video.

"So when someone tells you you're wearing garbage, don't get mad!"

"Please don't try to impose an "Only Polyester Clothing Allowable" world on us! Please! We lived through that in the 1970s and it sucked! ( no other word described how bad it was as well as "sucked". sorry about that)."

"someones wearing my coke bottle from 2 years ago"

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Morgan
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[*] posted on 22-11-2016 at 19:59


Quote: Originally posted by Metacelsus  
I recently read an article about brominated azo dyes as mutagenic contaminants in home environments:
https://cen.acs.org/articles/94/web/2016/11/Bromine-containi...

Thus, clothes dyed with these compounds should be avoided.


"Bromine-containing dyes dwarf flame retardants in house dust
Mutagenic azo dyes are the most prevalent brominated compounds in dust"

Today I took my dryer lint screen outside to remove the layer of lint and then tapped the screen like a tamborine to get the remaining lint off of it. If you haven't tried this in sunlight you're in for a big surprise. There's an immense blizzard of tiny particles you wouldn't otherwise see, just incredible how massive the glittery particle cloud can be. Stand upwind.
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[*] posted on 23-11-2016 at 06:05


I dont use a dryer and... guess what: my clothes last longer !

I only wear cotton under my (cotton) lab coat when handling chemicals and... guess what: my expensive synthetic clothes last longer !

When you look at the way fire retardant clothing work and when you look at what happens when you apply a flame to wool or cotton there are very few reasons that would make me buy fire retardant clothing.

But for everyday wear, especially now that winter is coming synthetic fibers are a Godsend.
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[*] posted on 23-11-2016 at 08:18


Good point about not using a dryer. I do that with jeans, just hang them on a coat hanger with 2 clothespins at the waist. If you want to soften them you can tumble them briefly after they're dried. Besides lasting longer it also saves energy. Also I've read you can use half the laundry soap that's recommended. I've a new largish washer and it uses so little water, barely covering the clothes, I often opt for the second rinse cycle, especially with new clothes. Some black Levi jeans made my fingers black just trying them on at the store. And probably one wash doesn't really keep it from coming off on you. I don't like to iron but if I had a lot of flat surfaces, I'd just lay my shirts out. I can't figure out how to hang shirts without clothespin crimp or line marks, even a towel rack leaves impressions.

"Last year I noticed the towels never seemed to come out perfectly clean and when they got damp after you got out of the shower they smelled dirty immediately. It turns out I was using too much washing detergent, the irony is that "too much" was how much the manufacturer recommended. One of the side effects of using too much detergent, especially on things like towels is that the detergent coats the fibers of the towel and it never gets a chance to fully dry and become fully clean—you get stuck in an endless cycle of towels that smell like they've never been washed. I reduced the amount of detergent I was using until I was using a mere 1/8th of the recommended amount. Everything from towels to t-shirts came out smelling fresher and more comfortable."
http://lifehacker.com/5493813/less-detergent-washes-as-well-...
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[*] posted on 25-11-2016 at 16:29


Aww. Levis aren't Levis anymore. Just cheap stuff, with the Levi label on it.

So now, the quest for quality denim seems to be eternal.

In addition to lesser quality cloth, the thread itself seems to be dyed differently. Pre-dyeing thread treatment, with Copper Sulfate, formerly embodied the finished fabric with lifelong rot resistance. Not so anymore.
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[*] posted on 25-11-2016 at 18:36


Here's some people who have noticed the dye problemo.

"It's worth noting that you can also pay lots of money for jeans that do the same thing. A friend bought some Levis Premiums and the damn color came off on his hands all the time."
http://ask.metafilter.com/58164/Jeans-are-turning-my-legs-bl...

"Said-editor told me the problem is so bad that she can't sit down on a white couch without fear of leaving behind embarrassing streaks where her tush was. Have any of you had this issue with your dark denim?"
"These jeans look cute, but they are a menace to white sofas everywhere. They even leave blue marks on our editor's hand when she rubs against her leg. Apparently, even washing them doesn't help the situation."
http://www.glamour.com/story/omg-the-dye-keeps-rubbing-off

"However I wanted to ask owners of specifically indigo denim if it ever stops rub off even after vinegar soaking. I have just bought 2 new pairs of dark jeans and fortunately I have only taken the tags off one pair. On first wear of the other pair today they rubbed off on my new converse, on the white rubber. Thankfully I was able to clean it off, but now I'm doubtful as to whether I want to keep the other pair if it will be problematic."
"PS I had a soak in the bath today and when I was shaving my legs blue dye came off too."
http://youlookfab.com/welookfab/topic/indigo-denim-dye-does-...

THE PROBLEM WITH INDIGO
http://www.popsci.com/blog-network/techtiles/problem-indigo

"Due to cheap labor costs, clothing is often made in some of the world’s poorest countries. Many workers in Asia, Africa and South America are exploited and made to work in unsafe conditions, for long hours for little money. Outside of these fabrics the manufacturing excesses and deposits are dumped, leaking out toxins, eroding the soil that these countries depend on."
http://guarojeans.blogspot.com/p/why-are-regular-blue-jeans-...
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[*] posted on 26-11-2016 at 01:03


My work colleagues who go to customer sites to do electrical and/or electronic repairs have to wear 'arc flash' rated clothing,
able to accept rated joules/cm2 without melting onto skin.
So natural fibers are used.
I assume that similar considerations apply to pyrotechnics clothing.

I find that natural fibers 'breathe' allowing sweat to evaporate rather than run down my body.

Clothes made with synthetic fibers usually need little or no ironing whereas most clothes made with natural fibers need ironing.

Hanging just-washed shirts on coat-hangers allows them to dry almost crease-free.
Button the shirt and clip the hanger to the washing line to resist windage.

Please stop criticising Chinese products and start criticising the Western companies that choose to buy the cheapest crap and mark it up sky high before selling to us
ripping-off both Western consumers and Eastern workers.
- Chinese manufacturers will supply anything paid for, from plastic poo to designer clothes, iPhones etc ...
Please remember that it was USA corporate interests that kept bangging on China's door to open up it's huge potential consumer base - forgetting the historical trading and manufaturing culture of the Chinese.
When we (UK) did this we eventually depleted all of our silver and resorted to opium and war to get it back.

[Edited on 26-11-2016 by Sulaiman]




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[*] posted on 26-11-2016 at 06:00


"Everyone is held accountable"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Y8xEMDlsyU#t=7m5s

Six cents an hour for 16 year old Jasmine
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Y8xEMDlsyU#t=18m37s

"My friends and I made these jeans for you."
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Y8xEMDlsyU#t=58m59s

[Edited on 26-11-2016 by Morgan]
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