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Author: Subject: Activated carbon properties and reduction with it
biomechem
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[*] posted on 5-1-2017 at 20:53
Activated carbon properties and reduction with it


Hello again!
The next problem of mine concerns some properties of activated charcoal which are not really clear for me.
First of all I must admit that mechanism of its work isn't fully clear for me. All I know is that it adsorbs many different substances on its surface.
Does it mean that it can only adsorb undissolved particles in a solution, and dissociated compounds remain untouched (in water- based solutions case)? What about nonpolar mixtures? Will adding activated charcoal to e.g. benzene will cause its adsorption or the benzene ring is too big compound for its pores?

Second problem that gives me sleepless nights is its application in the reduction.
Its huge sufrace would be great for a speed of reactions, but taking into account that most of those reductions occurs in high temperature without water it could adsorb product or even substrates, am I right? Would it be possible to extract adsorbed product or the adhesion is too strong?

Finally a question beetween chemistry and medicine. It's getting more and more popular to whiten teeth with activated carbon. Is it safe? Teeth are mostly made of hydroxyapatite but also organic compounds (about 2%). Can activated charcoal cause partial adsorption of tooth enamel?

[Edited on 6-1-2017 by biomechem]
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zed
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[*] posted on 10-1-2017 at 14:21


So many questions, so little time.

1. Information gleaned in the past, has led me to believe that de-colorizing via carbon, is best achieved via non-polar solvent. If possible.

The premise being, that colored reaction by-products, are more or less polar in nature. So that, the typical alcohol solvent, being polar, actually interferes with de-colorization by hogging adsorbsion sites.

2. Large surface area...... yeah. Difficulty recovering adsorbed products......... possibly. But, also to be considered.... Dispersing an expensive catalyst on carbon, may in some instances, provide some protection against catalyst deactivation or poisoning.

3. As for tooth enamel. Intact enamel, is constantly being replenished via minerals in saliva. And, brushing yer teeth with carbon, is an old practice. In Zen Macrobiotics, Eggplant Charcoal is used.



[Edited on 10-1-2017 by zed]

[Edited on 10-1-2017 by zed]

[Edited on 10-1-2017 by zed]
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aga
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[*] posted on 10-1-2017 at 15:20


This is an Amateur Chemistry Forum.

Please do not post garbage like this.

If you wish to find out about Activated Carbon and Teeth, please find an Authority on that, do whatever experiments you choose, then tell us all about it.

We'll all be Fascinated, guaranteed.




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biomechem
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[*] posted on 13-1-2017 at 07:10


Quote: Originally posted by aga  
This is an Amateur Chemistry Forum.

Please do not post garbage like this.

If you wish to find out about Activated Carbon and Teeth, please find an Authority on that, do whatever experiments you choose, then tell us all about it.

We'll all be Fascinated, guaranteed.


I don't want to be rude, but what's your problem? I got fabulous answers from a people way smarter than me and I am grateful to them. I wish I had opportunity to try everything I think of, but I'm not a student yet. That means the only possibility for me is to make all the experiments in my flat I do not want to poison my family and myself so I think you'll agree with me that it's better to ask professionalists.

According to activated carbon and teeth, I think it's the best question to chemists as some of them are specialists in adsorbtion and other physical processes, doctors are not usually thought of it.

Finally in the time you've written your post you could help another person, or make a step in self-improvement.
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aga
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[*] posted on 13-1-2017 at 09:14


Quote: Originally posted by biomechem  
I don't want to be rude, but what's your problem?

I was being rude.

Please accept my appologies.

A good way to find things out is to focus on a specific question then research/experiment with it. Google is a useful resource, as is sciencemadness.org.




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