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Author: Subject: Nitrostyrene and propene side product properties, having issues cleaning.
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[*] posted on 8-5-2017 at 16:08
Nitrostyrene and propene side product properties, having issues cleaning.


There's two side products I'm interested in identifying so that I can best determine how to clean them. If you've ever tried to synthesize one of these compounds you've likely come across the first which happens when the product polymerizes, typically from too much catalyst, too strong of a catalyst, or too long of a reaction time. I do not think it is the actual polymer because it is very odoriferous and some of it seems to come over during distillation, which is why I'm interested in it as it contaminates any recovered solvents and I'd like to re-purify them. It smells like very pungent gasoline, a very 'round' odor if that makes sense, it's like burnt gasoline or like gasoline combined with burnt popcorn or something. Is that ringing a bell for anyone? This seems to occur with any nitrostyrene, propene, etc. I believe this is a degradation product of the nitroalkane as I have detected the same smell when messing with them for something unrelated as well, though I can't remember what I did as it was awhile back that odor is very memorable.

The I believe is a polymerization product as well, however this one is a solid. It only seems to form on substituted nitrostyrenes. I suspect it's colorless, but have not investigated enough to determine. The main difficulty with this is it scales glassware and so far I have been unable to find a solvent to dissolve it. I have tried EtOAc, Acetone, and HCl. The only thing I haven't tried that I have on hand and may work is a strong acid and an oxidizer, but have not wanted to deal with having to then clean that up right now either. If ran correctly neither of these form so far as I can detect, but when working with new compounds you always have to experiment to find the best conditions so they're unavoidable to that extent.
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[*] posted on 9-5-2017 at 11:57


Two long paragraph and no relevant information whatsoever. It looks like you put quite a lot of effort in preventing anyone from giving an answer.
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