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Author: Subject: Seperating chrome from iron and nickel, stainless steel
JJay
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[*] posted on 4-4-2018 at 13:45


You'll have sodium and/or potassium bisulfate if the pH is low enough and enough sulfuric acid is present... not sure exactly how that will make a difference....



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Fulmen
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[*] posted on 4-4-2018 at 15:51


That's an excellent point, and both of these are far more soluble than the sulfates. I think it's worth a shot.



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JJay
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[*] posted on 4-4-2018 at 22:58


I'm thinking about dissolving some impure calcium chromate in water and dripping in sulfuric acid until I see no precipitate, filtering, and then adding an excess of sulfuric acid to see if I can get any chromium trioxide to precipitate. This seems like it might be a fairly dangerous experiment (especially if there are a lot of chlorides present), and I think a lot of sulfuric acid may be required, but I am pretty sure it will work....



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Fulmen
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[*] posted on 4-4-2018 at 23:49


Don't see why not. I don't see any reason for "titrating" the calcium, a slight excess of acid should be enough. With 10% sulfuric acid the precipitation was quite slow, producing a very dense ppt that was easy to filter off.
I would also concentrate the solution before trying to produce the trioxide, chromic acid is far more soluble than calcium chromate. This should remove more dissolved salts and reduce the amount of acid required.




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[*] posted on 6-4-2018 at 07:52


I give up. After acidifying it with sulfuric acid I added potassium carbonate in hope of precipitating potassium dichromate. No such luck. I did get a whiteish precipitate, but now the solution has turned an odd brown-green color. I don't know what I have anymore or how to deal with it, so I'm mothballing the project for now.



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[*] posted on 24-4-2018 at 11:53


I've been following the process from here
http://lanthanumkchemistry.over-blog.com/article-how-to-sepa...

I'm at the Bleach stage which is incredibly slowwwww.

I'm getting a nice yellow though, with yellow crystals of Sodium Chromate on evaporation mixed with Sodium Chlorate from the bleach, maybe a little Sodium Chloride from the electrolysis process.

I need some ammonium hydroxide and have Ammonium Sulphate, I electrolytically made some Sodium hydroxide and will combine this with the Ammonium Sulphate and bubble the Ammonia gas through water and add this to my dried filtrate to get Nickle Amine.

[Edited on 24-4-2018 by Peterae]

[Edited on 24-4-2018 by Peterae]
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