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Author: Subject: Deuterium lamp as neutron source
kratomiter
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[*] posted on 20-5-2017 at 07:31
Deuterium lamp as neutron source


Hi,

I realized that there are some cheap deuterium lamps available on eBay. Is it possible to make a neutron source from a deuterium lamp and an high voltage source?

I know that tungsten is not the best option as it don't form hydrides like titanium, but maybe it woth a try.
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Assured Fish
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[*] posted on 20-5-2017 at 19:07


I had a look at them but i have one question, where is their source of deuterium? if its internal then i can't imagine they would last particularly long.
I suppose if you were to jury rig the bulb so that you could supply your own deuterium it could function quite well as a small fusor and would without a doubt produce some neutrons but it wouldn't be anymore than the typical home built Farnsworth fusor. I suppose if you were too lazy to build a fusor yourself then this might prove as a cheap alternative.
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kratomiter
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[*] posted on 21-5-2017 at 08:43


Thnk you for your answer. I'm too lazy to build a fusor, I just want to play around with it and try to detect some neutrons or activated metals with them. It would be like a DIY neutristor. I also realized that the anode is made from Nickel, which easily forms hydrides.
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MineRVus
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[*] posted on 16-7-2017 at 11:29


I wouldn't say, a deuterium lamp could act as a real effective fusor. It probably will not do fusion at all, as the container (glass bulb) wouldn't even hold up to the vacuum level required to do fusion.
well explained "Assured Fish".

[Edited on 16-7-2017 by MineRVus]




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neptunium
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[*] posted on 17-7-2017 at 05:45


those lamp are made of quartz and deal with higher temperature than a normal incandescent bulb..they are pretty sturdy the vacuum would'nt be a problem really.. there is just not enough deuterium in them.
it would be like gathering argon from a light bulb witch is already at a low pressure.
also, they are built to generate a clear spectrum with the UV part unblocked by regular glass.
there is no way the get them to do anything else unless you break them.


[Edited on 17-7-2017 by neptunium]




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