Sciencemadness Discussion Board
Not logged in [Login ]
Go To Bottom

Printable Version  
Author: Subject: Identify This?
tomholm
Owner of BME Lab and Science and Elemental Scientific
***




Posts: 155
Registered: 24-2-2014
Location: United States
Member Is Offline

Mood: Good

[*] posted on 16-6-2017 at 07:56
Identify This?


Elemental Scientific has acquired a significant amount of used and new unique glassware. These items are being listed on our website in our Used Glassware category. Some of it, I'm having trouble identifying. Anyone know what this is? There's a reservoir inside, so it can be used for condensing or controlling the temperature of a liquid.

IMG_2238.JPG - 79kB




View user's profile Visit user's homepage View All Posts By User
elementcollector1
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 2684
Registered: 28-12-2011
Location: The Known Universe
Member Is Offline

Mood: Molten

[*] posted on 16-6-2017 at 07:59


Maybe it's used for reflux? Hard to explain why the top and bottom are joints and not hose barbs, though.



Elements Collected:52/87
Latest Acquired: Cl
Next in Line: Nd
View user's profile View All Posts By User
kavu
Hazard to Others
***




Posts: 207
Registered: 11-9-2011
Location: Scandinavia
Member Is Offline

Mood: To understand is to synthesize

[*] posted on 16-6-2017 at 08:25


It's an Abderhalden's drying pistol. Nowadays a fairly obsolete piece of equipment.

The male joint in the end is connected to a vacuum source, the male joint on the side is connected to a flask with solvent of suitable boiling point, and finally the female joint is connected to a reflux condenser. Boiling solvent will heat up the material placed inside the inner tube and drive off residual solvents and/or moisture.

[Edited on 16-6-2017 by kavu]
View user's profile View All Posts By User
alking
National Hazard
****




Posts: 250
Registered: 11-3-2016
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 16-6-2017 at 08:28


Yeah, I can't really imagine what that could be used for. Since the top larger joint is a male it's likely pictured upside down, or simply designed very poorly, both seem likely.

Regardless the two side joints would be horizontal and that's just a bad design if you're supposed to pass anything through there but air, maybe it's a leak and/or frustration condenser, you know, an adapter designed to slowly leak and frustrate the chemist.

edit: Ah, a drying pistol makes sense now that I see one in action. So it looks like it's missing the vacuum/desiccant adapter.

edit2: Doesn't sound too useful unfortunately. Unless I am misunderstanding the sole purpose is to utilize a solvent's BP to regulate the temperature of what you're drying. These days now that we have electrically regulated heat sources the whole thing could be replaces by a flask and vacuum adapter immersed in a water bath. It seems pretty wasteful since it's not even designed to reflux the solvent. You could rig up something to condense it 'upstream' and feed the condensate back into the pot though.

[Edited on 16-6-2017 by alking]
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Geocachmaster
Hazard to Others
***




Posts: 146
Registered: 5-3-2016
Location: Maine, USA
Member Is Offline

Mood: Corroded, just like my spatulas

[*] posted on 16-6-2017 at 08:35


Kavu is right, it's a drying pistol. It is intended to be used like this:

image.jpg - 1MB

A liquid is placed in a flask and connected to the side male joint. It is then refluxed, the hot vapors passing by the sample placed in the inner tube. A condenser connects to the other joint on the side. The large male joint allows the sample to be inserted and it also connects to a chamber filled with dessicant. P2O5 is usually used for water and paraffin wax for organic solvents.




I make chemistry YouTube videos: https://www.youtube.com/c/tomslab
View user's profile View All Posts By User
alking
National Hazard
****




Posts: 250
Registered: 11-3-2016
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 16-6-2017 at 08:39


Looking at that picture it does seem they attached the condenser directly on top. That just seems very inefficient to me though, am I wrong? The tube will be heated, but you're also dripping your condensate right back on it. It would be much more efficient to condense it in a loop and feed it into the bottom of the pot, you still have to reheat the solvent, but your tube never gets cooled and will be held at or near the BP.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Geocachmaster
Hazard to Others
***




Posts: 146
Registered: 5-3-2016
Location: Maine, USA
Member Is Offline

Mood: Corroded, just like my spatulas

[*] posted on 16-6-2017 at 08:47


Other have thought that before, alking. Here's one selling on eBay with exactly the design you mentioned:

IMG_1129.JPG - 108kB




I make chemistry YouTube videos: https://www.youtube.com/c/tomslab
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Dr.Bob
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 2430
Registered: 26-1-2011
Location: USA - NC
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 19-6-2017 at 07:05


Drying pistol it is, if you need more, I have a few also to get rid of. As stated, the idea was to use the BP of a liquid to create a very specific temperature inside the chamber, so you could heat samples under vacuum to dry them before sending off for analysis. (Typically elemental analysis, which requires dry samples.) Given the drop in people running elemental analyses, the ability to buy heating ovens cheap, and the issues with refluxing solvents, these are nearly obsolete now.
View user's profile View All Posts By User

  Go To Top