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13enigma
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[*] posted on 19-6-2017 at 08:49
how to increase the mass/weight of a copper nanoparticle


I need help finding a way to increase the weight and size of my copper nanoparticle. What can I add or do? I want to be able to increase its size by not adding more of copper nanoparticle concentration but by simply funding a way to increase the size and weight of one nanoparticle. Will heat work?
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MeshPL
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[*] posted on 19-6-2017 at 12:40


As far as I know, changing the ratio and concentrations of metal ions and reductant often lead to change in nanoparticle size. However, finding correct ones is a matter of trial and error.

Heat may also help. You must check. Maybe evan change of the stabilising ligand. I don't think anyone can tell you what the outcome will be with certainity, that's what I learned when I helped a bit with silver nanoparticles at the university, when I was invited to do so one day.

Assuming you can measure your copper nanoparticles (otherwise asking how to make them bigger would make little sense), you should be able to make a few batches and do a series of tests via electron microscopy or diffraction measurements or whatever.

[Edited on 19-6-2017 by MeshPL]
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13enigma
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[*] posted on 19-6-2017 at 22:36


Can you explain the stabilizing ligand? How can changing the stabilizing ligand increase the nanoparticle size, or better yet, which stabilizing ligand increases nanoparticle mass and size
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[*] posted on 20-6-2017 at 10:58


Stabilising ligands increase stability of nanoparticles in their solutions, without them nanoparticles would simply crash out and be not really workable with. Examples include all kinds of surfactants, long chain thiols, carboxylic acids, polyethylene oxide, polyethylene glycol... The are used in pretty much all of academic work regarding nanoparticles. As they attach to growing nanoparticles they certainly influence the way they grow and thus their size and mass. I don't know however, how the ligands specifically affect all kinds of nanoparticles. You shouild either consult a specialist, find some academic publications or do your own research on that matter.

[Edited on 20-6-2017 by MeshPL]
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13enigma
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[*] posted on 21-6-2017 at 07:39


I had colloidal gold and I added to it sulfamic acid, thickening surfactant and hydrochloric acid. I boiled it and the solution turned yellow then green. I added bleach and boiled it and the solution turned brown. All this happened in a pot. A stainless steel one. The solution had brownish reddish orange particles and I assumed it was iron oxide from the pot since it was corroded by the HCl. But that wouldn't be the case since there is not that much iron in the Stainless steel and the chromium didn't fall through into the solution. So as of now idk what it is?
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[*] posted on 21-6-2017 at 08:57


Sounds like a mess. Why would you carry out reactions like that in a metal container?



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13enigma
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[*] posted on 21-6-2017 at 09:37


I wasn't thinking really. Now I'm in a state of confusion
I didn't have any beakers at the time.
Most likely I'm thinking it's iron oxide but idk really, I would also need to see chromium but for some reason it's doesn't show any signs within the solution
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[*] posted on 26-6-2017 at 13:56
How to increase the SIZE AND MASS of silver nanoparticles


I bought an expensive batch of silver nanoparticles from a medical lab. The particles are to small for me to use. The solution contains nanoparticles that are 20 parts per million. How can I increase the mass and size to the extent that I can see and touch the metal particles?????

I am trying to create a plating solution but I wish to make the silver last longer and I want to increase the mass and size of the already available small minute nanoparticles.
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violet sin
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[*] posted on 26-6-2017 at 17:58


Honestly, if you want to see and touch the metal particles... Why did you purchase nanoparticles? They are between 1 and 100 nanometers across by definition. 1 nanometers is 1 x 10-9 meters. Not trying to be rude here, that's just super small. They should be free metal, not solution,... Well actually a solution with tiny bits of free metal. What I meant is they aren't dissolved as an ionic species or chemically combined state.

Being tiny with high surface area, they should be easy to chemically manipulate. There may be a protecting substance adhered to the surface of the particles to prevent agglomeration to larger bits, followed by settling from solution. You would have to consult the manufacturer.

To the best of my knowledge, you can't plate out free metal from solution. Normally, plating bath metal ions react to the developed charge between electrodes and act as transport for electrons and complete the circuit. The plating material anode kicks off metal cations to solution when sending an electron to to the battery, and the cathode captures a metal cation with an electron supplied from the battery -> free metal plating. Except where you are doing an electroless plating, and the solution deposited freely by trading the more active surface with the more noble metal in solution and transferring electrons locally.

Could you spell out what you are trying to do, maybe with a hint as to your skill level. Really hard to just guesstimate how much you already know. Do you have a plating bath you wish to make specifically? You'd be hard pressed to randomly come up with something new that works well. Big business companies do a decent job of figuring those kind of things out already.




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[*] posted on 26-6-2017 at 18:24


I'm just an amateur hobbyist in chemistry. I took college chemistry up to orgo 2.
But the thing is that if I found a way to remove the capping agents in the solution would it be possible to grow the nanopartickes under heat
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[*] posted on 27-6-2017 at 15:28


Umm.

Well, They sometimes do a chloride determination, that way.

Silver Chloride is pretty insoluble. At normal temperatures, Silver Nitrate solution, plus NaCl solution(or whatever), will produce a colloidal ppt, with such tiny particles, that it can not be easily filtered.

The solution? Boiling.

The premise is, that some Silver Chloride particles will dissolve, and feed other particles, thus increasing over-all particle size. Seems to work. But, it is a royal pain.

Better to manipulate initial conditions to produce larger particles.

So, you could try boiling your solution for an hour or two, a day or two, or a week or two.

Might work.

Might look into techniques for directly producing either a colloidal silver, or some silver particles......of exactly the dimensions you need. Seeing and touching size, is pretty big.

[Edited on 27-6-2017 by zed]

[Edited on 28-6-2017 by zed]
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13enigma
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[*] posted on 27-6-2017 at 15:31
CHANGING/INCREASING THE SIZE AND MASS OF A PARTICLE/NANOPARTICLE


Is it possible to chemically manipulate the size of a nanoparticle? How can one increase the size of a nanoparticle to "regular visible to naked eye" particle. I want to be able to see the metal nanoparticle with my eyes without a microscope and be able to touch it.
I realized that the capping agent limited the particle size from growing. What can I do to manipulate it to normal larger size?? Ho can I do this???
I am dealing with copper nanoparticles. Please help me
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[*] posted on 27-6-2017 at 16:32


Quote: Originally posted by 13enigma  
I realized that the capping agent limited the particle size from growing

I'll say! Turn that capping agent off immediately.

For future reference, there's a light on your keyboard that lets you know when it's on.




The first step in the process of learning something is admitting that you don't know it already.

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violet sin
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[*] posted on 27-6-2017 at 17:11


I'm sure if you just dissolve them with an acid and ppt the metal from solution... Maybe a touch of nitric to dissolve and then add citric acid to reduce to Ag again.

I found a thread from somewhere else, concerning reduction to metal by several sources, talks a bit about the role of capping agents and how if you dry them, they agglomerate irreversibly. This was found by typing 'citric acid reduction of silver nitrate' into google search. Plenty of other options. But if I recall correctly, that combo will work on several metals,

https://www.researchgate.net/post/Extraction_of_Silver_Nanop...

You may be able to make several attempts to get your desired size. And if you have any luck, don't spend a pile on something you can make from your 1oz bars.
------------
==A Facile pH Controlled Citrate-Based Reduction Method for Gold Nanoparticle Synthesis at Room Temperature
=pdf
https://nanoscalereslett.springeropen.com/track/pdf/10.1186/...
----------
==Synthesis and Characterization of Monometallic (Ag, Cu) and Bimetallic Ag-Cu Particles for Antibacterial and Antifungal Applications
= https://www.hindawi.com/journals/jnm/2016/2187940/
Looks decent.
----------
==Mechanisms of Nucleation and Growth of Nanoparticles in Solution
=pdf
https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&...
-------
==One-Step Green Synthesis of Metallic Nanoparticles Using Sodium Alginate
= https://www.hindawi.com/journals/jnm/2016/9790345/
..In this study, we synthesize copper, silver, and gold nanoparticles using sodium alginate as reducing and stabilizing agent under microwave irradiation..


[Edited on 28-6-2017 by violet sin]

[Edited on 28-6-2017 by violet sin]




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13enigma
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[*] posted on 29-6-2017 at 11:24
is it possible to increase the mass/weight and enlarge the size of a silver/gold nanoparticle


I hear that when metals are in a nanoparticle form they are easy to manipulate.
So I have 45 ml of silver nanoparticles. I want to be able to see and touch the particles, but I can't since they are in nanoparticle state. How can I increase their ads and enlarge their size.

Also for a 20 parts per million colloidal gold solution, if I add bleach and sodium metabisulfite, will I be able to leach out gold powder visible to naked eye
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violet sin
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[*] posted on 29-6-2017 at 17:58


Let's start off with one thing... You do not get to make a new thread asking the same things over and over, because the first three responses do not give you satisfaction immediately. or perhaps they required you to put more thought into your questions and do some reading, do some math. Edit button is your friend, as is saying " hey, I was also wondering about ... " in thread.

Either stick with the single thread and reform your questions as your knowledge of the subject increases, or look elsewhere. I'm not telling you to get lost at all, but no one is going to do all your searching for you.. I litterally just linked numerous papers which have some great info for you to find your answers on agglomeration.. they deffinitely covered how to do that. But it is not their aim, so there is * no heading * which says " Ch. 13) GROWING NANOPARTICLES TO VISIBLE SIZES ". You have to draw your own conclusions from what you read.

Your last question. Make it big enough to see.. is that even possible?
I haven't done this in a long while, but good time to practice 'eh.

(1) 45 ml Ag nanoparticle
(2) 20ppm solution.
(3) unknown amount of silver
(4) unknown size bit.

1ppm = 1mg/1l water.
20ppm = 20mg/1L H2O
( 20mg Ag / 1000ml H2O ) x 45ml =
20 x 45 / 1000 = 0.9 mg

0.9 mg = 0.0009g Ag x (1 cm3/ 10.49g Ag) =
(0.0009 x 1cm3) / 10.49 = 0.000085 cm3
Pretty darn small I'd say. 8.5 x10-5 cm3
I doubt you could either see or touch it meaningfully. Or my math sux, been a long work day - easily possible.

You paid a lot for not much, because of its special size of particles, not the amount of silver.




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[*] posted on 5-7-2017 at 05:06


The simple direct answer is that the total mass of the Ag nano particles would be insufficient to effectively plate out, assuming that would even be possible.

Better idea, trade/sell your nano silver for say aqueous AgNO3.

Nano silver has application in disinfecting and removal of organics (pollutants,...).

[Edited on 5-7-2017 by AJKOER]
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[*] posted on 5-7-2017 at 06:27


When I was experimenting with colloidal silver suspensions I deliberately stopped growing them before they reached 20ppm as a lot of the literature that I read indicated that above 20ppm the silver particles will precipitate rather than form a suspension.



CAUTION : Hobby Chemist, not Professional or even Amateur
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[*] posted on 19-7-2017 at 11:19
Granulation and/or spray dryer question in regards to particle size


I had some colloidal copper solution. If they were to go through a granulation process. Would it be possible to end up with visible solid copper particles?

I'm fascinated with this field of granulation. (Sorry if I sound like an idiot). I saw milk turn into powder and etc. It's amazing
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