Sciencemadness Discussion Board
Not logged in [Login - Register]
Go To Bottom

Printable Version  
Author: Subject: Testing Ceramics resistance to acids and bases
symboom
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 801
Registered: 11-11-2010
Location: Wrongplanet
Member Is Offline

Mood: Doing science while it is still legal since 2010

[*] posted on 15-7-2017 at 14:23
Testing Ceramics resistance to acids and bases


Testing with
sulfuric acid
Hydrochloric acid
Nitrate salt and sulfuric acid for nitric acid in situ
Sodium hydroxide

http://global.kyocera.com/fcworld/charact/chemistry/chemires...

No reaction seems to occur
Havnt tested
mixed acids
Can ceramic mugs be used in some instances where one doesnot have borosilicate glassware sulfuric acid was boiled to concentrate no pitting or destruction occured it looks like a coffee mug could be used to concentrate sulfuric acid

white mugs are used as the other pigments might react
Camping ceramic mugs are made to be more robust from falls and thermal shock unlike most ceramics

Dont have other acids
Anyone try these tests or predict what will happen

I am not advocating for someone to use cermamic or aluminum instead of borosilicate glassware such as some know I had a post about making nitric acid with a coffee maker but many the laws for glassware is strict even for a beaker so I wanted to help those out that are interested that can not get access to glassware or any other reason

Update boiling solutions of sulfuric acid Hydrochloric acid and sodium hydroxide all in separate containers to see if it will attack the surface after mugs with acid will be tested with sodium hydroxide ceramics contain aluminum so if aluminum hydroxide forms then it proves that some was attacked by the acid


I apologize if this is unsuited discussion

[Edited on 15-7-2017 by symboom]

[Edited on 15-7-2017 by symboom]




Chemistry video Storage
https://www.mediafire.com/folder/kbll6gz9bdb4q/Videos
The State of Mad Science newsletter
http://www.sciencemadness.org/talk/viewthread.php?tid=98577
My open source scratch paper
Pastebin.com/u/symboom
Natures Intellectual Organic Peroxide. >>Ascaridole <<
2020 year of science
Oxone
Used for the production of --> CH2O/Cl2/ClO2/Br2/I2
------------------------------------->>Hydrogen Peroxide <<
Sodium had its fame long enough time for Calcium
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Foeskes
Hazard to Others
***




Posts: 156
Registered: 25-2-2017
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 18-7-2017 at 02:09


I found that the coating on ceramics may be SiO2. I melted NaOH on a ceramic drying dish and it dissolved quite a bit of it. (That drying dish broke after I put it on top of thermite)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
symboom
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 801
Registered: 11-11-2010
Location: Wrongplanet
Member Is Offline

Mood: Doing science while it is still legal since 2010

[*] posted on 18-7-2017 at 08:07


Thanks you for the reply I tested all the acids I have. Only sodium hydroxide did I see a little percipitate indication a reaction it was boiling sodium hydroxide also the acids were heated to test if ceramic is resistant to hot acid also tested mixed acids so you might be right about the SiO2

[Edited on 18-7-2017 by symboom]
View user's profile View All Posts By User
tsathoggua1
National Hazard
****




Posts: 335
Registered: 8-1-2017
Location: Beyond the pale
Member Is Offline

Mood: Phosphorescent

[*] posted on 18-7-2017 at 09:45


If you made HNO3 in-situ from a nitrate and H2SO4, does that not count as mixed acid? You could try (with distilled acid) HNO3/HCl (aqua regia, the active nitrating species is nitrosyl chloride, and highly reactive) don't store aqua regia, make it up fresh and only what you will use then and there, storage can lead to bottles bursting due to build up of pressure from gaseous decomposition, which is of course, definitely not something you wish to happen with aqua regia)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Lena01
Harmless
*




Posts: 2
Registered: 1-8-2017
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 1-8-2017 at 05:30


Significance and Use

3.1 This test method is intended for testing ceramic tile that are to be used for food counters, lavatories, and similar residential, medical, and commercial installations, where they may come in contact with food, chemical, and waste substances and for tile in areas where they may be exposed to contact with strong cleaning agents.

3.2 The specification of 10 % hydrochloric acid solution and 10 % potassium hydroxide solution as normal testing fluids, and the length of exposure time and temperature are based on experimental laboratory work and interlaboratory tests, where it was indicated that resistance to these two substances probably assures resistance also to any other acidic or alkaline substance coming in contact with tile, except hydrofluoric acid.

3.3 The validity of using color difference as means of determining the degree to which tile surfaces are affected by acids and alkalies has been established by interlaboratory test and was found to be more reliable than the determination of loss of gloss, particularly for unglazed tile and mat or semimat glazed surfaces. Lack of coordination between instrumental value and visual effect was noted only in the case of minute surface changes, detectable only by oblique viewing.




:)
View user's profile View All Posts By User

  Go To Top