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Author: Subject: What are "synthetic iron oxides"
Foeskes
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[*] posted on 14-9-2017 at 02:22
What are "synthetic iron oxides"


It is found in most hardware stores. It has many colors
Black(Fe3O4), Red(Fe2O3), yellow(?), Green(?),blue(?)
I'm not sure if yellow or green iron oxides is possible. I might test if the green oxide is Cr2O3 since it looks very similar. Although after messing around with the red oxide, it seems to be calcined.
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NedsHead
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[*] posted on 14-9-2017 at 03:06


If you look up the safety data sheet (SDS, MSDS) it'll tell you what the product consists of
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Elemental Phosphorus
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[*] posted on 14-9-2017 at 04:06


I have a 1 pound bag of yellow iron oxide. It is most certainly possible, but the name 'iron oxide' is somewhat misleading, since it is actually iron oxide-hydroxide. (FeOOH)
I believe with enough heating it forms red iron oxide.
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Foeskes
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[*] posted on 14-9-2017 at 04:57


Honestly most stuff in my country doesn't have msds. Even H2SO4 drain cleaner doesn't mention sulfuric acid on the bottle, just don't mix with basic drain cleaner. I did get a bag of white synthetic iron oxide, which is calcium carbonate. No idea on the green and blue one.
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MrHomeScientist
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[*] posted on 14-9-2017 at 06:44


What is these synthetic oxides used for? I wonder why they would claim it to be iron oxide when clearly it isn't. Does that particular chemical have lots of uses where you are?
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Foeskes
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[*] posted on 14-9-2017 at 06:56


It seems to be used for dyeing. It is in the paint section of most hardware stores.
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[*] posted on 14-9-2017 at 09:31


Pigments. I am amazed at the report of a "white Iron oxide" being offered.

In pyrotechnics, red and black Iron oxides are used as catalysts in such things as whistle mix. There are "natural" Iron oxides offered (crushed iron ore? RUST?!), as well as synthetic. They can have radically different performances, even among substances which are supposedly all "red Iron oxide" or "black Iron oxide".

Look at Iron oxides sold as cosmetics ingredients, offered on Amason, eBay & etc.




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Foeskes
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[*] posted on 22-9-2017 at 01:14


I'm still not really sure what the dark blue "oxide" is.
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[*] posted on 22-9-2017 at 01:27


I'm guessing they are called "iron oxides" as they are the most commonly used pigments, especially for concrete&masonry work.



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[*] posted on 22-9-2017 at 04:47


I googled for sellers of iron oxide. The were some misleading intro pics but I found no blue iron oxide for sale.
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Foeskes
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[*] posted on 22-9-2017 at 17:44


I might buy some later and post a image. Maybe it's Prussian blue? Since it's name is pretty misleading.
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clearly_not_atara
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[*] posted on 22-9-2017 at 18:57


Fougerite? Technically an oxide-hydroxide-carbonate:

https://duckduckgo.com/?q=fougerite&t=lm&iax=1&i...

[Edited on 23-9-2017 by clearly_not_atara]

fougerite.png - 95kB
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