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wh0re
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[*] posted on 7-2-2007 at 09:09
do you need a sink?


I want to start building a lab, however. I cannot install a tap in my room but do i need one? Is there another solution for a water in and a water out?

Cheers, Dan.
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YT2095
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[*] posted on 7-2-2007 at 09:16


depends what you want it for really, if it`s a water supply for condensers then no, a large water volume in a brewers bucket with a 12v pump will suffice.
I don`t have a sink in this Lab, but there`s one across the hall and so I can "do the Dishes" in there.
as for water used in reactions, go to a car repair place or even a garage and buy a few bottles of Battery Top-Up water, it`s pure enough for most all reactions.




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wh0re
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[*] posted on 7-2-2007 at 09:38


Can you suggest 12v pump?
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unionised
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[*] posted on 7-2-2007 at 09:43


You need the tap in the lab to wash the acid splashes off your hands and face quickly. I guess a big bucket would do, but I wouldn't like to have to rely on it.
The tap's handy for other stuff too.
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woelen
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[*] posted on 7-2-2007 at 09:47


I myself have a home lab for experimenting and I must not think of having running water nearby. If it is not in that room itself, then it should be really nearby. If you have done experiments with test tubes and the like, then you want to cleanup things easily afterwards. Running water is a must for that, in order to get rid of impurities completely.



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wh0re
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[*] posted on 7-2-2007 at 09:49


There is one near by definetely, Its just not possible to have one if the lab room that is all.
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YT2095
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[*] posted on 7-2-2007 at 10:04


sounds like my situation then, and yes, it`s Perfectly workable this way :)

my Lab is a Skywalk and plumbing was never considered when it was built (nor was heating for that Matter! Grrrrr!), if there`s one really close like here, it`s not a problem. or at least I have never encountered one.

EDIT: as for the Pump part, mine is an old Bilge pump from a boat, it`s older than Gods Dog! but still works :)


[Edited on 7-2-2007 by YT2095]




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woelen
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[*] posted on 7-2-2007 at 10:13


Quote:
Originally posted by wh0re
There is one near by definetely, Its just not possible to have one if the lab room that is all.

That's OK. I have had such a situation myself and that is perfectly useful.
It also is very pleasant if you have good ventilation in the lab, either by means of a large open window, or by means of a GOOD mechanical ventilation.




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kaviaari
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[*] posted on 7-2-2007 at 10:49


I am nowdays fortunate enough to have a sink and running water in lab. You can always have a bucket filled with water and put the used labware in it and wash them somewhere else when your work is done.

Other bucket can be used to store cooling water.

Sink and running water helps a lot but you can quite easily live without them.




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wh0re
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[*] posted on 7-2-2007 at 16:20


Thanks for the replies boys and girls.
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[*] posted on 7-2-2007 at 16:48


Hello,

I used a recirculating (Cole Parmer) thermostatted water bath for cooling/heating water. For a lab-grade supply, I bought some of those large distilled water jugs (at tje supermarket, the oblong type, complete with a spigot). I used this water to make beer, then filled the jugs using the 18MO barnstead at work. These sit nicely on a shelf, and are quite convenient if the spigot just protrudes beyond the edge. I kept several squirt bottles full for both making solutions and washing the occasional chemical droplet from my forearms (I usually wear gloves). For really nasty work, viz. boiling H2SO4, etc., I would not do these without a running source of water *immediately nearby*.

Ever been sprayed in the face with hot 10N NaOH? (thank whoever you want that I was wearing safety glasses:cool:).

The difference between a close call and a real problem? About 30s.

Be safe,

O3




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Chris The Great
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[*] posted on 7-2-2007 at 17:43


Yeah NaOH in the face burns! Gotta hate sep funnels and low boiling non-polars sometimes :(

I use milk jugs of water since there is no water in my lab. It's only a real pain when cleaning up since to do it I need to walk inside, and you can poor the milk jugs on your searing flesh if there is an accident (see first line of the post for how I know that).

I use a small pump from one of those decorative fountains, it plugs into the wall and has enough juice to circulate water through the condenser. I used an old bucket I found on the side of the road for that. When there is snow outside I use that instead of ice, though my condenser gets to show me weird bugs and plants as they come out of the melting snow and get pumped through the system :D

When the ice gets low, I drain some of the water using the out tube on the condenser, then add more.
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