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briancady413
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[*] posted on 19-12-2017 at 12:21
Volcanic CO2 riddle


So they say industrialism's releasing about thirteen times the natural volcanic carbon dioxide emission, right? But the earth's age is about 4.5 billion years, thoughout which we might expect volcanoes to have been emitting CO2. That 4.5 billion number is huge, multiplied times even a 1/20th of annual industrial CO2 emission equals a huge amount. Where'd it all go?

[Edited on 19-12-2017 by briancady413]
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JJay
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[*] posted on 19-12-2017 at 12:26


I'm not exactly an expert on this subject (few people are, and even the best weathermen are often wrong), but typically it ends up as limestone. There's also a lot of coal, peat, methane, petroleum, etc.



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[*] posted on 19-12-2017 at 12:26


Mostly to photosynthesis, producingl organic matter and many rocks - limestone etc.

Edit: beaten by milliseconds :(

[Edited on 19-12-2017 by Sulaiman]




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[*] posted on 19-12-2017 at 12:43


Have you never heard of equilibrium? That CO2 that's been produced over four billion years has also been consumed over four billion years. The problem is that we've increased the rate of production of CO2, but we haven't been able to increase its rate of consumption.



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woelen
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[*] posted on 19-12-2017 at 12:57


Most CO2 finally ends up in the form of carbonates. Millions of years later it can be released in volcanic eruptions. Plant life also takes up considerable amounts of CO2, but that's only what is present in the atmosphere. If all CO2, bound as carbonate, would be released, then we would have an atmosphere like currently exists on Venus.



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[*] posted on 19-12-2017 at 13:09


Stores of carbon on earth in order...

geologic -- mostly carbonate rocks
sea water
atmosphere
biomass


Each separated my several orders of magnitude. Actually, looking up the numbers for these is insightful. It raises a number of significant questions.
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[*] posted on 19-12-2017 at 19:37


Worse, perhaps... is the methane problem. The Ruskies, amongst others, are concerned about the melting of the Arctic and Semi-Arctic permafrosts. Really a lot of methane is locked up therein. Should it be released into the atmosphere, it will be a lot more damaging than CO2. It is a much more potent Greenhouse gas.

Which has led to some strange plans to lower permafrost temperatures, by reintroducing vast herds of Arctic grazing animals.... Like re-engineered Wooly Mammoths.

http://www.history.com/news/scientists-say-they-could-bring-...



[Edited on 20-12-2017 by zed]
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briancady413
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[*] posted on 20-12-2017 at 14:19


Wow, very sharp crowd here; Carbonates it is, by a large margin. For extra credit, what, besides dissolved CO2, are the major sources of reactants in carbonate formation?

[Edited on 20-12-2017 by briancady413]
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[*] posted on 20-12-2017 at 14:41


Quote: Originally posted by zed  

Which has led to some strange plans to lower permafrost temperatures, by reintroducing vast herds of Arctic grazing animals.... Like re-engineered Wooly Mammoths.

http://www.history.com/news/scientists-say-they-could-bring-...


Yes, the idea is that the mammoths would promote growth of grasses over trees, thus increasing the albedo.

I actually had the opportunity to meet George Church last summer at a private dinner event, and one of the things he talked about was the woolly mammoth project. What he would create (at least initially) would be more like cold-adapted elephants than true mammoths, but this would probably be functionally equivalent.

(He also talked about making programmable biosensors in the form of tattoos, a topic which I found quite interesting.)

[Edited on 12-20-2017 by Metacelsus]




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[*] posted on 20-12-2017 at 15:23


Quote: Originally posted by briancady413  
Wow, very sharp crowd here; Carbonates it is, by a large margin. For extra credit, what, besides dissolved CO2, are the major sources of reactants in carbonate formation?

[Edited on 20-12-2017 by briancady413]


From what I learned in geography, a lot of carbonate rock like limestone is the result of biological processes such as coral formation and the remains of mollusc shells. The calcium carbonate can dissolve in seawater, where it subsequently precipitates and forms a solid mass. Here in the UK, we have what we refer to as the 'Jurassic Coast' on the southern seafronts near Cornwall and Devon, of which the limestone is known to have formed biologically due to the significant presence of marine fossils, having been exposed by erosion.




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briancady413
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[*] posted on 21-12-2017 at 03:06
Volcanic CO2 riddle


@LearnedAmateur: Getting warmer, but not quite identifying the source of the reactants yet.
Anyone else? Hint: the reactant source is far from the carbonates formed.

[Edited on 21-12-2017 by briancady413]
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[*] posted on 21-12-2017 at 03:48


I'd like to note we're all so killing off one of the carbon sinks, known as deforestation! So we need to get our collective crap together as that's a ton easier then finding a new planet and becoming universe cancer.
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[*] posted on 21-12-2017 at 17:17


Well, oxygen is an extremely abundant element on and inside the Earth. The second most abundant is silicon.

So, I imagine that as the Earth formed, or even before that, as the gaseous nebula condensed, Si burned with O to make a lot of SiO2. Al burned with O forming Al2O3. Some of the SiO2 and Al2O3 combined to make various aluminium silicates. Na burned with O. H burned with O. Mg, Ca C burned with O making MgO, CaO, CO2.
We also got Mg silicates, Na silicates and various other silicates.

So, I'm guessing early Earth's volcanic CO2 that was belched out combined with some of the free MgO (Mg(OH)2) and CaO (Ca(OH)2) that was on the surface of the Earth.

****The above is just a product of my imagination. I don't know much geology.




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[*] posted on 22-12-2017 at 08:47
Volcanic CO2 riddle


Vmelkon's response covers what I'm looking for, although more geology details would be welcomed. Types of rock, prevalence, location, etc. Anyone?
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[*] posted on 22-12-2017 at 11:36


There is a HUGE difference between weatherman and environmental scientist. Weatherman often don't even have degrees
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[*] posted on 22-12-2017 at 17:29


Quote: Originally posted by Chemvironment  
There is a HUGE difference between weatherman and environmental scientist. Weatherman often don't even have degrees


Hey that's not true! They can download them now days!
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[*] posted on 23-12-2017 at 09:28
Volcanic CO2 riddle


OK, I'm spilling the beans: mafic and especially ultramafic rock weathering by carbonic acid releases magnesium, calcium and other cations which wash to the sea, if they're not already there. These are the reactants that form the carbonates which bind so much carbon on earth. For more on this, see: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbonate%E2%80%93silicate_cyc...
Thanks for reading, and riddling, this far.
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[*] posted on 23-12-2017 at 10:34


Quote: Originally posted by Chemvironment  
There is a HUGE difference between weatherman and environmental scientist. Weatherman often don't even have degrees


On the radio, not everyone who reports the weather has a degree, but typically, radio personalities do have one. Every TV meteorologist I have knowledge of has a degree in a field related to weather forecasting.




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[*] posted on 24-12-2017 at 02:49


'Mafic' rock is lower in silicates and higher in magnesium and iron oxides.

[Edited on 24-12-2017 by briancady413]
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