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Author: Subject: Your last "OH SHIT!" moment [aka how I accidentally made manganese heptoxide]
DavidJR
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[*] posted on 13-3-2018 at 13:42


I thought you were going to say you blew yourself up with acetone peroxide...
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DavidJR
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[*] posted on 16-3-2018 at 16:04


Uhh... turns out a solution of para-benzoquinone in dichloromethane can penetrate nitrile gloves...



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DJF90
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[*] posted on 17-3-2018 at 01:38


Considering that nitrile gloves offer little to no protection to DCM ("splash protection" at best), I can't say I'm surprised.
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DavidJR
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[*] posted on 17-3-2018 at 02:16


Yes, I realise this now. :(

I wasn't going about dipping my hands in it, it was just a splash & I did take the gloves off shortly after. So to be honest I wouldn't even say they offer splash protection for DCM.
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LearnedAmateur
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[*] posted on 17-3-2018 at 08:37


Damn, looks like my hands after a KMnO4 spillage, apparently p-benzoquinone can cause rashes and localised tissue necrosis - definitely keep an eye on it. If it’s just stained though then it isn’t a huge deal but by the sounds of it, it’s not an overly pleasant compound to be working with..



In chemistry, sometimes the solution is the problem.

I am now training to manufacture contact lenses for a living. Time to join the lab community!
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DavidJR
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[*] posted on 17-3-2018 at 11:14


It's not painful at all so I'm hoping that it's just temporary staining. And yeah, it's not a particularly pleasant compound, the vapours are very irritating to the eyes and throat, and even as a room temperature solid it sublimes readily so there's more vapour than you realise.
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RawWork
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[*] posted on 12-4-2018 at 16:39


I accidentally poured glacial acetic acid on my hand. It made huge painful red stain on it. Same as burn. I remembered some advices that I have to flush it with lots of water. I flushed it 20 minutes with running water. Believe it or not in 2 hours all color and pain dissapeared like nothing ever happened. This happened many years ago.

I had a picture but removed it :(

[Edited on 13-4-2018 by RawWork]
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LearnedAmateur
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[*] posted on 13-4-2018 at 01:29


Similar thing happened back when I was in school, accidentally got some acetic anhydride (synthesis of aspirin) on my finger and I had a stinging white blister about a centimetre across immediately come up.

Oh yeah, and once I almost drank white spirit back when I was into making model aircraft, got a mouthful thinking it was a bottle of water (didn’t check the bottle). That’s another reason to have a room dedicated to chemistry, and I’m really lucky it wasn’t anything else! Surprisingly it didn’t really taste of much, it was mostly the smell that gave it away.




In chemistry, sometimes the solution is the problem.

I am now training to manufacture contact lenses for a living. Time to join the lab community!
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[*] posted on 16-6-2018 at 07:27


I was in high school (in another era, when you were actually allowed to do real chemistry in school) and was doing some reaction in a test tube with benzene. Don't remember what it was, a nucleophilic substitution of some sort. I was actually my chemistry's teacher star pupil and was allowed to work unsupervised. I was alone in the lab at the time. The reaction wouldn't start by itself so I started carefully heating the test tube over a burner. Nothing happened. I started heating it more strongly. The benzene started vaporizing and condensing in the upper parts of the tube as a condensation ring, then dripping back to the bottom (essentially refluxing in the tube). The reaction still wouldn't start. I heated it some more. The condensation ring started getting higher, then higher, then reached the opening of the tube...

Suddenly I found myself holding a test tube (in a tube holder not in my hand, I'm not that crazy) with a column of flame about 1 meter high shooting from it. And black soot started floating everywhere in the pristine lab. I had the good presence of spirit to take a big breath, then blow as hard as I could parallel to the mouth of the tube. That extinguished the flame. I spent the next 30 minutes cleaning everywhere in the lab, and it was a big room (about 10*20 meters).

I learned a valuable lesson that day, that I remember to this day. Fortunately without harm.
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