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Author: Subject: Exotic Powerful oxidizers list
symboom
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[*] posted on 19-3-2018 at 20:35
Exotic Powerful oxidizers list


Powerful oxidizers
Organic peroxide
TEMPO
Hydroxyl radical
Organic perchlorate
Organic nitrate
Chlorine trifluoride
Oxygen difluoride
Fluorine
Perchloryl fluoride
Chloryl fluoride
Fluoroamine
Nitrogen trifluoride
Potassium Perbromate
Nitronium perchlorate
Iodine perchlorate
Sodium ozonide
Monoperoxydisulfate
Potassium Peroxide
Silver peroxide
Copper peroxide
Potassium Ferrate
Potassium Permanganate
Sodium Bismuthate
Sodium plumbate
Potassium Nitrite
Chlorine
Dibromine trioxide
Chlorine monoxide
Chlorine hypoxide
Iodine pentoxide
Potassium Peroxymonosulfate
Potassium Peroxydisulfate
ruthenium tetroxide
Potassium ruthnate
osmium tetroxide
Lithium platinate
Trioxidane
Potassium selinate
Potassium Perchlorate
Chlorine dioxide
Iodine monoxide
Iodine dioxide
Chloroamine
Bromine dioxide
Bromine monoxide
Potassium Nitrate
Chlorine nitrate
Iodine nitrate
Potassium superoxide
Potassium peroxide
Silver peroxide
sodium ruthenate
Potassium osmate
Potassium perosmate
Selenic acid
Dinitrogen pentoxide
Dinitrogen trioxide
Nitrous oxide
Potassium peroxyhyponitrite
Potassium Hyponitrite
Potassium Peroxymanganates
potassium peroxychromate
Chromium(VI) oxide peroxide

Anything missing maybe organize from most powerful to least

[Edited on 20-3-2018 by symboom]




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[*] posted on 20-3-2018 at 00:00


Iodine monoxide? Iodine dioxide? The same for bromine? Dibromine trioxide? I do not think these compounds exist (except maybe in a frozen matrix at -200 C or so).

You forget a whole class of more common oxidizers:
- hypochlorites
- chlorites
- chlorates
- iodates
- periodates (for cleavage of C-C bonds between two C-OH parts of molecules)

And why is KNO3 or KMnO4 exotic?




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[*] posted on 20-3-2018 at 00:05


TEMPO is not an oxidizer really... it is a free radical scavenger usually used in combination with oxidizers.

I don't see any molybdates or tungstates. Some chromium oxidizers are more exotic than others.





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[*] posted on 20-3-2018 at 00:26


Barium ferrate (VI) is a good oxidizer as well. It is very easy to make. All I did to make it was dissolve some sodium hydroxide in 5% bleach and then add some iron III oxide from the hardware store. I let this mixture stir for about two hours and then decanted the pink/purple/red liquid into another container. I then added a bit of magnesium sulfate for stabilization. Then I added a solution of barium chloride to this. Thus I produced barium ferrate stabilized in a barium sulfate matrix as a precipitate which supposedly prevents it from reacting with CO2 (from a patent I can't seem to find at the moment). In order to make the process faster, you could also use calcium hypochlorite (bleaching powder) instead of laundry bleach.

Edit: I forgot to mention that the initial sodium ferrate solution can't be put through a filter. It decomposes upon contact with paper and destroys glass frits. You can only let the excess of iron III oxide settle and then decant the solution. This will take a bit of time as pigment-grade iron III oxide is a very fine powder. Neither is filtering the solution after precipitating the barium ferrate advisable. It is monstrously alkaline and will rapidly eat through paper and will irreversibly damage glass frits.

[Edited on 20-3-2018 by CobaltChloride]
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[*] posted on 20-3-2018 at 02:42


Other interesting oxidizing agents include Ag III and Ni IV as seen in this article: http://woelen.homescience.net/science/chem/exps/Ni+persulfat...
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[*] posted on 20-3-2018 at 02:59


A vast list of oxidising agents . Many are common and many we haven't heard of . Anyway good work



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[*] posted on 20-3-2018 at 03:08


Many oxidising agents you missed
MnO2
KNO3 is more powerful than KNO2
PbO2
Fuming HNO3
Conc H2SO4
Oxygen
H2O2
Chlorine
Bromine
Iodine
Sulphur
Na2O2
BaO2
Aqua regia
Pb3O4
Chlorates
Chlorites
Hypochlorites
And what about inter halogen compounds and oxides and fluorides of Xenon
CrO3
CrO2Cl2
K2Cr2O7
O3

[Edited on 20-3-2018 by Akhil jain]

[Edited on 20-3-2018 by Akhil jain]




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[*] posted on 20-3-2018 at 03:52


I am not sure what this list is for. Or what exactly quaslifies as exotic.

But I am going to add FOOF to the list. Dioxygen difluoride. You can read about it in "In the pipeline" by Derek Lowe.
Suffice to say you manufacture the stuff by reacting a stream of monatomic fluorine with oxygen at 700C. (Balls of flint right there.) Then cool to cryogenic temperatures to make it safe to handle. Safe is a relative term. It reacts explosively with ice at -196C. Quartz becomes a ball of flame. I have no idea what it is kept in. I am going to guess fluorine-passivated tantalum or something equally unusual. In any case it fits the brief of being both exotic and oxidising.

Make a video if you ever have occasion to witness this stuff. I am curious but there is no way I would ever approach it close enough to see anything.




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[*] posted on 20-3-2018 at 11:48


NBS is occasionally used as oxidizer



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[*] posted on 20-3-2018 at 12:34


Sulphur dichloride.

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[*] posted on 23-3-2018 at 15:01


ferrates (Fe(VI), not just potassium listed above)
cuprates (Cu(lll))
peroxymonocarbonate
O (atomic oxygen)
O(2P) (singlet oxygen)
O(3P)
H2O2

In addition to the hydroxyl radical cited above:
.O-
.O2- (superoxide radical anion)
.O3- (ozonide radical)
.HO2
.HO3 (from .OH + O2)
Monoatomic chlorine radical (.Cl )
Cited above Cl2O
.ClO
.ClO2 (stable radical, chlorine dioxide)
.ClO3 (chlorate radical)
Cited above ClONO2 (chlorine nitrate)
Cited above Br2O
.BrO
Cited above .BrO2 (stable radical, bromine dioxide)
.BrO3
Cited above N2O
.NO2 (stable radical, nitrogen dioxide)
.NO3 (nitrate radical)
NHCl2
NCl3
.SO3
.SO4 (sulfate radical)
.SO5

[Edited on 23-3-2018 by AJKOER]
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[*] posted on 1-4-2018 at 10:57


fluorine oxidizers
Potassium fluoromanganate
Potassium fluoronickelate
Potassium fluoroferrate
Potassium fluorochromate
Potassium fluorocuprate
Potassium fluoroiodate
Potassium fluoroplumbate(lead)
Ozone difluoride
And chlorine trifluoride not shure which is stronger
potassium permanganate does not dissolve in many organic solvents. If an organic solution of permanganate is desired, "purple benzene" may be prepared, either by treating a two phase mixture of aqueous potassium permanganate and benzene with a quaternary ammonium salt


Bismuth pentafluoride is the most reactive of the pnictogen pentafluorides and is an extremely strong fluorinating agent. It reacts vigorously with water to form ozone and oxygen difluoride, and with iodine or sulfur at room temperature. BiF5 fluorinates paraffin oil (hydrocarbons) to fluorocarbons above 50 °C and oxidises UF4 to UF6 at 150 °C. At 180 °C, bismuth pentafluoride fluorinates Br2 to BrF3 and Cl2 to ClF.[1]



platinum hexafluoride was the first compound to oxidize molecular oxygen and xenon

Bismuthate oxidizes water
2 NaBiO3 + H2O → 2 NaOH + Bi2O3 + O2


(manganese heptoxide
ruthenium tetroxide
osmium tetroxide
iridium tetroxide
Nitrosonium octafluoroxenate
Manganese tetrafluorideVI)
Potassium hexafluorobismuthate

Bismuth pentafluoride is the most reactive of the pnictogen pentafluorides and is an extremely strong fluorinating agent. It reacts vigorously with water to form ozone and oxygen difluoride, and with iodine or sulfur at room temperature. BiF5 fluorinates paraffin oil (hydrocarbons) to fluorocarbons above 50 °C and oxidises UF4 to UF6 at 150 °C. At 180 °C, bismuth pentafluoride fluorinates Br2 to BrF3 and Cl2 to ClF.[1]


[Edited on 1-4-2018 by symboom]




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