Sciencemadness Discussion Board
Not logged in [Login - Register]
Go To Bottom

Printable Version  
Author: Subject: Just joined...Saying hello to everybody.
MJ101
Hazard to Self
**




Posts: 51
Registered: 14-6-2018
Member Is Offline

Mood: Always Sunny

[*] posted on 14-6-2018 at 05:13
Just joined...Saying hello to everybody.


Hi,

Firstly, I'd like to say thanks for having me as a member here. My specialty is electronics and software development, but I've always had a passion for chemistry. I'm currently retired, so I decided to start teaching myself.

TBH, I doubt that I will be performing any reactions. I live in a big city, and I know how dangerous that can be. For me, the fun is in learning how the reactions work.

I hope that this post is in the right place.

Best,
:MJ
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Magpie
lab constructor
*****




Posts: 5829
Registered: 1-11-2003
Location: USA
Member Is Offline

Mood: Chemistry: the subtle science.

[*] posted on 14-6-2018 at 05:25


Welcome! There is a lot you can do in your kitchen or garage. I have a lab in my garage but some just use their kitchen for non-toxic or very small scale experiments.

I retired 16 years ago. I'm a chemical engineer by training but do get into electronics, especially as applied to stepper motors for mixers. I just bought an arduino so will be building the projects in their starter kit. I also hope to teach myself to program in the C language.




The single most important condition for a successful synthesis is good mixing - Nicodem
View user's profile View All Posts By User
aga
Forum Drunkard
*****




Posts: 7028
Registered: 25-3-2014
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 14-6-2018 at 05:49


Hello and Welcome to ScienceMadness !

Many complex 'experiments' happen in kitchens all the time when food is cooked.

An easy one is to weigh a small amount (say 16 grammes) of baking soda in a small oven-proof dish.

Stick it on the hob or in the oven for a while, leave it to cool, then it should then weigh about 10g.

Chemistry in action !

(careful with the resulting sodium carbonate - treat it the same as lye)




View user's profile View All Posts By User
Dragonjack12
Harmless
*




Posts: 3
Registered: 24-5-2018
Location: Northern Minnesota
Member Is Offline

Mood: Chlorine trifloride

[*] posted on 14-6-2018 at 07:17


welcome. I agree that it can be very interesting just to learn the formulas and what happens when they are mixed together, but it can become very tempting to mix some NaOH and Al to float a balloon or make some fire collar packets. on that note if you take some copper, some vinegar and some hydrogen peroxide mix it in a plastic cup. let it sit for month or so until it evaporates you will be left with copper acetate crystals. Start a small fire and through them in and you will then have a blue green fire! This works with a lot of metals ( basically any metal that can displace H) anyways welcome and happy science:D:D;);):)



Jack place
View user's profile View All Posts By User
MJ101
Hazard to Self
**




Posts: 51
Registered: 14-6-2018
Member Is Offline

Mood: Always Sunny

[*] posted on 14-6-2018 at 07:31


@Magpie: I'm fluent in C,C++, C# and Object Pascal. I haven't worked with the Arduino yet. (Been meaning to pick one up)
But I have done a bit of work with the Microchip PIC. (16f877,18f452)

So, if there's anything I can help with, please feel free to let me know. :)

@aga: Heating NaHCO3 yields CO2 + H20 (That pesky Dihydrogen Monoxide) and the result is NaCO3
I admit I had to look in Wikipedia, but I do remember washing soda from too many years ago. :)

When I cook, I mix the ingredients and apply copious amounts of love (TLC) to the reaction.

I suspect that Chemists do the same. :)


View user's profile View All Posts By User
Magpie
lab constructor
*****




Posts: 5829
Registered: 1-11-2003
Location: USA
Member Is Offline

Mood: Chemistry: the subtle science.

[*] posted on 14-6-2018 at 08:19


Thank you MJ101. I may very well need some help down the road.

Right now I just connected with a post-doc at a local university who teaches Mechatronics. I now have 3 stepper motors running off an arduino that he programmed for me.




The single most important condition for a successful synthesis is good mixing - Nicodem
View user's profile View All Posts By User
aga
Forum Drunkard
*****




Posts: 7028
Registered: 25-3-2014
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 14-6-2018 at 08:40


Quote: Originally posted by MJ101  
I admit I had to look in Wikipedia

Shhhh ! Don't let the secret out. People think we all know everything already.

Quote: Originally posted by MJ101  
I suspect that Chemists do the same. :)

Depends on the quality of the Chemist.

Some of us just mix stuff up in a bucket and hope for the best :o

I'm also a C programmer. Ditto on the help thing.

PICs are some of my favourite devices, although i always use assembler on 'em.

Adruino 'C' is a little bit different to what you're used to, but not much.

Certainly won't need a doctorate to get that 4th stepper running ;)

[Edited on 14-6-2018 by aga]




View user's profile View All Posts By User
zed
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1616
Registered: 6-9-2008
Location: Great State of Jefferson, City of Portland
Member Is Offline

Mood: Semi-repentant Sith Lord

[*] posted on 15-6-2018 at 14:51


Quote: Originally posted by MJ101  
Hi,

Firstly, I'd like to say thanks for having me as a member here. My specialty is electronics and software development, but I've always had a passion for chemistry. I'm currently retired, so I decided to start teaching myself.

TBH, I doubt that I will be performing any reactions. I live in a big city, and I know how dangerous that can be. For me, the fun is in learning how the reactions work.

I hope that this post is in the right place.

Best,
:MJ


Well, hello to you too. You will revitalize your chemistry quickly here, but only if you want to.

Between this site and YouTube, it's like having a hundred chemists tutoring you.

The difficult, is accomplished immediately! The impossible, takes only slightly longer!

Hello, Hello!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v_5r-Zd2i7I

[Edited on 15-6-2018 by zed]
View user's profile View All Posts By User
AJKOER
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 2286
Registered: 7-5-2011
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 16-6-2018 at 06:41


Before performing a new experiment or adding an ingredient not in the usual prep, please ask on SM what are the possible consequences!

Bad things can and do happen even for experienced chemists, so get an opinion as to potential unsafe experiments (like dangerously reactive to near explosive, immediately toxic or long term potentially toxic, fire hazard,..). Note even preparing safe things in large quantities like H2, which has a large range of possible mixes with air causing a room, house..., to explode on simply turning on a light switch, is a possibility to avoid. Also, even N2 or CO2 generation may be problematic in a small room.

Some procedures could be wasteful in consuming expensive reagents, or perhaps otherwise performed better. For example, there may be a classical approach to a synthesis, but there could be more recently reported a better and less costly photolysis or electrolysis path!

Also, even if you plan on buying lab related stuff, discuss it privately (U2U) or publicly as many items could trigger visits from the local authorities depending on local laws and enforcement practices.

[Edited on 16-6-2018 by AJKOER]
View user's profile View All Posts By User
MJ101
Hazard to Self
**




Posts: 51
Registered: 14-6-2018
Member Is Offline

Mood: Always Sunny

[*] posted on 16-6-2018 at 07:01


@zed: Thank you for your kind wishes.

@AJKOER: Thank you for your advice. It's good to know that I can ask here.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
JJay
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 2899
Registered: 15-10-2015
Location: Western Hemisphere
Member Is Online

Mood: :cool:

[*] posted on 16-6-2018 at 11:58


Greetings. I am also a programmer. I haven't done anything with PICs, but I know a few assembly languages. I have some basic electronics skills and some basic chemistry knowledge.

I would suggest generally not buying anything that you aren't comfortable buying openly, but there are a few exceptions. I'm not posting on Facebook for my 2000 friends about how excited I am with my new 500 mL bottle of chloroform, for example, but it's not exactly a secret that I have a lab.




This is my YouTube channel: Extreme Red Cabbage. I don't have much posted, but I try to do nice writeups once in a while.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
MJ101
Hazard to Self
**




Posts: 51
Registered: 14-6-2018
Member Is Offline

Mood: Always Sunny

[*] posted on 17-6-2018 at 06:47


Hi JJay,
Thanks for the kind words and sage advice.
View user's profile View All Posts By User

  Go To Top