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Abromination
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[*] posted on 28-7-2018 at 23:41
Copper lactate?


Just now I was messing around when I realized that this wad a thing. Copper lactate, the copper (ii) salt of lactic acid. I am now intent on adding this to my copper compounds collection. First off, I don't imagine that I can precipitate it strait from milk. How would I extract lactic acid from milk? Then I would assume that I would convert the lactic acid to sodium lactate and add copper sulfate or another such reaction unless I am speaking to soon and this will end up as the next damn copper borate. I would like to hear your guys opinion on this: how can I extract lactic acid from milk and is the reaction possible in the way I have highlighted it?




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Hendrik
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[*] posted on 29-7-2018 at 00:16


You don't have to complicate your life by extracting lactic acid from milk. Pretty sure you can buy a coffee descaler. They usually contain L-lactic acid. Other descalers may contain HCl, but when it comes to coffee machines, lactic acid is mainly used.
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[*] posted on 29-7-2018 at 05:39


Once you have your lactic acid, react that solution with basic copper carbonate.



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[*] posted on 29-7-2018 at 05:41


There is (practically) no lactic acid in milk.
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mayko
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[*] posted on 29-7-2018 at 07:13


You can buy food-grade lactic acid from winemaking and homebrew suppliers; my local brew store carries a lot of LD Carlson products including these:

https://storefront.ldcarlson.com/storefrontCommerce/subcateg...




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Abromination
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[*] posted on 29-7-2018 at 10:45


The concentrated of lactic acid in milk is because of the fermentation of lactose: could you simply ferment the extracted lactiose with yeast to get lactic acid?



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[*] posted on 29-7-2018 at 14:12


From what (little) I have read, there are a variety of organisms that produce lactic acid -- some better than others. Part of the challenge is isolating those that produce the highest quantity -- which involves a few generations of agar plates.
Then the second challenge is that the lactic acid is converted to other byproducts as fast as it is produced.
I think if you can find LA already isolated you will save yourself a lot of headaches. From there, copper lactate should not be difficult.
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Abromination
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[*] posted on 29-7-2018 at 15:40


You are probably right; I wasnt as concerned with getting lactic acid as I was with if the reaction(s cause lots of ways to do it) is possible like it would be with producing, say, copper (ii) acetate versus copper (ii) borate or silicate. When I think about it know I really shouldn't have any trouble. Boron salts are very different than lactate salts.



List of materials made by ScienceMadness.org users:
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--------------------------------
Elements Collected: H, Li, B, C, N, O, Mg, Al, Si, P, S, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ag, I, Au, Pb, Bi, Am
Last Acquired: B
Next: Na
--------------
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[*] posted on 30-7-2018 at 12:35


Quote: Originally posted by Abromination  
Just now I was messing around when I realized that this wad a thing. Copper lactate, the copper (ii) salt of lactic acid. I am now intent on adding this to my copper compounds collection. First off, I don't imagine that I can precipitate it strait from milk. How would I extract lactic acid from milk? Then I would assume that I would convert the lactic acid to sodium lactate and add copper sulfate or another such reaction unless I am speaking to soon and this will end up as the next damn copper borate. I would like to hear your guys opinion on this: how can I extract lactic acid from milk and is the reaction possible in the way I have highlighted it?


Come on, you want to make copper lactate? We know you just want the lactic acid for check forging or for making other illegal papers.

Most chemical suppliers sell it, and I think it's on ebay as well. I know dry cleaners use it for removal of ink stains, if all else fails, you could go to a dry cleaner and ask if they have some and if you could buy some. They also have some other neat chemicals that can be useful.
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