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Author: Subject: Barium Nitrate
Justin Blaise
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[*] posted on 5-12-2014 at 19:50


That all sounds pretty good. I would probably dilute the acid to avoid it reacting too quickly, but it is likely fine as is. Be careful not to add too much carbonate to your acid at once or it will foam over.

Also, if ground joint glassware is available to you, you may consider adding the acid via addition funnel to a slurry of the carbonate in a 2/3 neck flask to contain the barium-rich aerosol as much as possible. Just something to consider.
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[*] posted on 5-12-2014 at 20:11


Thanks, I do have ground joint glassware so I will try it with a two-neck round bottom flask and addition funnel.
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Justin Blaise
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[*] posted on 6-12-2014 at 07:23


Woelen has some great notes on making barium salts here;

http://woelen.homescience.net/science/chem/exps/BaCl2_2H2O/i...

There will be some amount of solid that won't dissolve no matter how much acid you add, if you're using pottry grade material. I found that letting it settle for a long time was the easiest solution, rather than trying to filter the extremely fine particles.
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otonel
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[*] posted on 29-12-2014 at 13:24


Squall you can make barium nitrate by boiling barium carbonate with calcium nitrate like in this patent http://www.google.com/patents/US2010046
I have two question:
- if I make electrolysis of a solution of barium sulfate can obtain barium hidroxide?
-can obtain barium nitrate by electrolysis a solutions of barium sulfate and calcium nitrate?
I want to resolve that misery theoretical first because I don`t have much time to make that kind of experiments and i ask about decomposition of barium sulphate electrolytically because thermal decomposition need high temperature and barium sulfate is available for me as radiocontrast agent
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Metacelsus
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[*] posted on 29-12-2014 at 13:47


Barium sulfate is highly insoluble, so you won't be able to dissolve it for the electrolysis.



As below, so above.
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nezza
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[*] posted on 30-12-2014 at 00:38


Barium sulphate is difficult to convert to other barium salts. It can be converted to Barium carbonate in an equilibrium by repeated boiling with alkali carbonate, filtering, washing and reaction with acid to dissolve the barium carbonate formed.
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[*] posted on 30-12-2014 at 05:44


It's interesting to see such an old post of mine again. I've learned a lot since those days .

Greenlight your posted procedure is how I make my barium nitrate these days too.
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[*] posted on 30-12-2014 at 06:19


Quote: Originally posted by nezza  
Barium sulphate is difficult to convert to other barium salts. It can be converted to Barium carbonate in an equilibrium by repeated boiling with alkali carbonate, filtering, washing and reaction with acid to dissolve the barium carbonate formed.


Or glow it with an excess carbon at red heat for a prolonged time:

BaSO4 + 2 C === > BaS + 2 CO2




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[*] posted on 30-12-2014 at 07:45


Squall, do you use 62% nitric acid as well?
Does anyone know how to purify the Barium nitrate so it can be used effectively in green colour compositions?
I read on a patent that you can wash it with ice cold (0.degrees) low concentration nitric acid solution, would this work or is there a better way?
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Justin Blaise
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[*] posted on 30-12-2014 at 08:41


Barium nitrate solubility in water shows decent temperature dependence, so you could try the conventional recrystallization once you let the fine solids settle out.
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[*] posted on 30-12-2014 at 10:05


Please remember to handle carefully! Check toxicity, Barium carbonate was used as RAT POISON.

Avoid using any Sodium compounds if you want this for green flames, small traces of Sodium yellow/orange will ruin a Barium green.

Start with a very pure Barium compound, Strontium is present in most technical grade materials. Sr is quite difficult to chemically separate from Ba- and will also ruin green flames in surprisingly mall amounts.

If cost was no object, I would choose reagent grade Barium carbonate & nitric acid.

Also consider Barium peroxide as a colorant and oxidizer-

http://www.privatedata.com/byb/pyro/pfp/tracers.html#Tracers...

[Edited on 30-12-2014 by Bert]




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[*] posted on 30-12-2014 at 13:10


Cheddite Cheese You have right about barium sulfate solubility, what I think was to fiind an easy way to make barium nitrate .
I find another patent about making barium sulphide from barium sulfate using lower temperature then using just carbon or charcoal US4795625
Can be replaced barium nitrate with lead nitrate or calcium nitrate in some pyrotechnic recipes?
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[*] posted on 31-12-2014 at 08:12


Quote: Originally posted by otonel  
Can be replaced barium nitrate with lead nitrate or calcium nitrate in some pyrotechnic recipes?


Not if a bright green is what you're after.

Finely ground BaSO4 should also be reduced in a 'thermite-style' reduction with Al powder:

BaSO4 + 8/3 Al === > BaS + 4/3 Al2O3

This should burn very brightly at over 2,500 C (end temperature). The cooled, crushed mass would then be lixiviated with dilute HCl or HNO3 and filtered, to obtain the respective barium salt and much H2S. The annealed alumina doesn't dissolve in dilute acids.

This method avoids using a furnace altogether.

[Edited on 31-12-2014 by blogfast25]




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[*] posted on 31-12-2014 at 17:00


The best green colour flame is obtained with Barium chlorate. This is occasionally available on Ebay and gives a really deep green flame colour.
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[*] posted on 1-1-2015 at 14:17


Quote: Originally posted by Squall  
I have always wanted to distill my sulfuric acid to get the dye out of it

Seeing as the thread's been revived, i'll add that you can remove the colouring from drain cleaner H2SO4 by adding some 3% H2O2 and then boil until it fumes.

Well before it fumes, the colour has gone.

When it fumes, you have a clue as to the concentration of the acid.

No distillation aparatus required.

[Edited on 1-1-2015 by aga]




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[*] posted on 1-1-2015 at 14:47


Quote: Originally posted by nezza  
The best green colour flame is obtained with Barium chlorate.


Oddly enough, men and women seem to differ on that perception. I recall that some blind tests of green star mixtures by a US pyrotechnic club showed men leaned towards the Barium chlorate greens, with women trending toward preferring the Barium nitrate greens.




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[*] posted on 18-1-2015 at 08:52


This is not the right thread for that question, in addition, use the edit button rather than posting again. To answer your question, while it technically is possible, there is no reasonable way to do this. It is possible however through a metathesis reaction with barium chloride and sodium chloride. This will leave a sodium contaminated product which will need to be purified if used for pyrotechnics.
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[*] posted on 18-1-2015 at 12:33


Quote: Originally posted by not_important  
Squall,
sounds a lot like the one here http://www.sciplus.com/category.cfm/subsection/4/category/42...

Distilling nitric acid takes a bit of care, rubber stoppers can make it tricky.

I use something similar to UI-3830 here http://www.uicoglass.com/distillingah.htm which minimizes the number of joints to deal with.

Isothermal distillation is slow, but gets you away from the need to heat stuff, and to worry about what hot nitric acid is going to do to your apparatus.

The best one sciplus sells is their one entitled 'essential oils' (they always have joke titles for their products), it's all-glass and usually $95, has a coil condenser, and some other nice stuff. Haven't purchased it, though.




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[*] posted on 21-2-2015 at 23:56


Quote: Originally posted by Xenoid  
Quote:
Originally posted by Fleaker
@ Xenoid, would it not be easier to just dissolve BaCO3 in dilute HNO3 or am I missing something obvious?


Yeah! Good one! Whoops!

I naturally assumed he would not have nitric acid (the holy grail), I don't either!
Whereas hydrochloric acid is fairly readily available in most hardware stores.

Also, once you have your Ba in solution as the chloride, it's in a somewhat more useful form than the carbonate. I made up a large batch of concentrated solution, a fairly smelly procedure with pottery barium carbonate.

Regards, Xenoid

[Edited on 22-8-2007 by Xenoid]


Opposite for me, I can get concentrated nitric acid for a few dollars a pint. But I can't for the life of me get concentrated sulphuric and hydrochloric acid. Guess everyone has their own problems. lol
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