Sciencemadness Discussion Board
Not logged in [Login ]
Go To Bottom

Printable Version  
Author: Subject: How to get rid of phenol smell on body, clothes?
fusso
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1797
Registered: 23-6-2017
Location: 4D universe
Member Is Offline

Mood:

sad.gif posted on 12-9-2018 at 02:53
How to get rid of phenol smell on body, clothes?


I really want some phenol but also fear that the smell would stay on me for a long time after using it in experiments. I don't want to let my friends smell that weird (unfamiliar to ordinary people) odour or know that I play with chemistry. So I want to know how to get rid of that smell (at least reduce the smell to human-undetectable levels) prior to buying some. Thank you.

[Edited on 12/09/18 by fusso]




View user's profile View All Posts By User
DrP
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 625
Registered: 28-9-2005
Member Is Offline

Mood: exothermic

[*] posted on 12-9-2018 at 03:23


Use it in the fume cupboard. Wear a lab coat and gloves. Wash after use and change your clothes before going out.

Others might not even notice it. So what if they do?


Will deodorant mask the smell

[Edited on 12-9-2018 by DrP]




\"It\'s a man\'s obligation to stick his boneration in a women\'s separation; this sort of penetration will increase the population of the younger generation\" - Eric Cartman
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Heptylene
National Hazard
****




Posts: 265
Registered: 22-10-2016
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 12-9-2018 at 05:06


Phenol being soluble in water, washing your clothes and taking a shower should be sufficient to get rid of the smell, IF the smell is even a problem in the first place.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
macckone
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1393
Registered: 1-3-2013
Location: Over a mile high
Member Is Offline

Mood: Electrical

[*] posted on 12-9-2018 at 14:13


If anyone notices after a shower and a change of clothes, you spilled some chloraseptic. The active ingredient is phenol.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Atrum
Hazard to Self
**




Posts: 72
Registered: 7-12-2014
Member Is Offline

Mood: Tired AF

[*] posted on 12-9-2018 at 21:58


I work with phenol everyday. I have grown to like that smell. My lab mates all think i'm crazy lol.
If you are really concerned about it. Just use some ethanol on the spots you spilled on your self. It is much more soluble in it.




"Experience is my one true mistress and I will cite her in all cases. Only through experimentation can we all truly know anything." ~Leonardo da Vinci

My inventory

Recently acquired elements: Iodine , Cobalt, Tungsten, Silicon
View user's profile View All Posts By User
fusso
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1797
Registered: 23-6-2017
Location: 4D universe
Member Is Offline

Mood:

[*] posted on 13-9-2018 at 00:23


Quote: Originally posted by DrP  
Use it in the fume cupboard. Wear a lab coat and gloves. Wash after use and change your clothes before going out.

Others might not even notice it. So what if they do?


Will deodorant mask the smell

[Edited on 12-9-2018 by DrP]
Would phenol smell penetrate gloves and stick to hands?



View user's profile View All Posts By User
DrP
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 625
Registered: 28-9-2005
Member Is Offline

Mood: exothermic

[*] posted on 13-9-2018 at 02:21


Quote: Originally posted by fusso  
Would phenol smell penetrate gloves and stick to hands?


Depends on the gloves and how much you get on them. Going by what others have said above I would think that it shouldn't be an issue. Keep up standard good practices (i.e. - don't pour it over your gloves just to test the theory) and you should be OK. The smell shouldn't stick and it isn't that bad anyway compared to the smell of some other chems.

Decent gloves should stop the penetration of light splashes.... but it isn't advisable to soak your gloved hand in the solvent for example.




\"It\'s a man\'s obligation to stick his boneration in a women\'s separation; this sort of penetration will increase the population of the younger generation\" - Eric Cartman
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Waffles SS
Fighter
*****




Posts: 949
Registered: 7-12-2009
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 13-9-2018 at 02:43


Wash your clothes and your hands with Sodium carbonate solution.Phenol is more soluble in alkaline solution



Chemistry = Chem + is + Try
View user's profile View All Posts By User
MrHomeScientist
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1803
Registered: 24-10-2010
Location: Flerovium
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 13-9-2018 at 05:38


Standard gloves will likely provide little protection from phenol; see the attached glove chemical resistance chart.

Attachment: Ansell Chemical Resistance Guide, 7th ed (317kB)
This file has been downloaded 112 times

For phenol, nitrile gloves are NOT recommended.

[Edited on 9-13-2018 by MrHomeScientist]
View user's profile Visit user's homepage View All Posts By User
zed
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1766
Registered: 6-9-2008
Location: Great State of Jefferson, City of Portland
Member Is Offline

Mood: Semi-repentant Sith Lord

[*] posted on 25-9-2018 at 13:25


Pure Phenol is both a blistering agent, and a potent local anesthetic.

Not a thing you want to be splashing around.

You feel nothing, but when you look at your hand, you see a large fluid-filled blister has formed, where it has inadvertently contacted some Phenol.

Odor reminiscent of Cloves. Or, the once popular "Chloraseptic Lozenge": A handy sore throat palliative.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chloraseptic

Seems to me the active ingredient used to be a chlorinated phenol. But, I could be mistaken.



[Edited on 25-9-2018 by zed]

[Edited on 25-9-2018 by zed]
View user's profile View All Posts By User
DrP
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 625
Registered: 28-9-2005
Member Is Offline

Mood: exothermic

[*] posted on 2-10-2018 at 01:34


Quote: Originally posted by MrHomeScientist  
Standard gloves will likely provide little protection from phenol; [Edited on 9-13-2018 by MrHomeScientist]


exactly - like I said - if splashed lightly they will help by stopping the direct contact - you can take it off quickly before it soaks through and put another glove on.... but don't dip your fingers in it and leave the solvent on the glove while you continue to wear it.




\"It\'s a man\'s obligation to stick his boneration in a women\'s separation; this sort of penetration will increase the population of the younger generation\" - Eric Cartman
View user's profile View All Posts By User
macckone
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1393
Registered: 1-3-2013
Location: Over a mile high
Member Is Offline

Mood: Electrical

[*] posted on 2-10-2018 at 19:59


Looking at the actual ratings for phenol, only nitrile fails completely.
Neoprene and natural rubber are still ok.
With PVC being the best.

A multi-layer would probably be even better.

Clearly the best solution is don't splash or spill chemicals on your protective gear or skin.
View user's profile View All Posts By User

  Go To Top