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Author: Subject: adapting a domestic MW
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[*] posted on 9-10-2008 at 07:55


Here a link upon reaching 1300 [Cels] within a standard-microwave-oven,within 5 minutes, using "activated coal" as susceptor :
http://alp.dillingen.de/chemiekongress/doc/Workshopergebniss...

Maybe charcoal would work too ?
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Nixie
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[*] posted on 9-10-2008 at 10:38


Why does it need to be activated?



\"Good is a product of the ethical and spiritual artistry of individuals; it cannot be mass-produced.\" --Aldous Huxley
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[*] posted on 9-10-2008 at 11:27


I don't know if "activated" does better; I now tried a cup full of charcoal for 2 minutes: It heated up (but did not glow, neither catched fire) and now is 2 half-cups; but it also had some solid NaCl-melt on the bottom, from a previous run, so maybe the cup was weak already ...
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FrankRizzo
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[*] posted on 9-10-2008 at 13:41


I *believe* that graphite will work. Maybe paint it on to the inner surface of the crucible with sodium silicate solution?
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[*] posted on 9-10-2008 at 15:01


I remember crushing up a silicon carbide grinding wheel and that worked best (bonded with clay). Second place was a ferrite yoke from an old TV. Serious insulation is critical to get something really hot because the losses to the environment are huge when you get a decent temperature going (and don't forget to block the fan grille on the inside of the oven cavity).

[Edited on 9-10-2008 by Nixie]




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FrankRizzo
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[*] posted on 9-10-2008 at 16:13


Silicon carbide can also be found in an already powdered form as well. Any online lapidary supply will have it in various particle sizes for use as a grinding grit.

Carbon would seem to be the better material as it will withstand much higher temperatures.
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