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Author: Subject: List of reducers
gatosgr
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[*] posted on 23-10-2018 at 13:15
List of reducers


Hi this is a list of readily available plants for reducing copper salts to copper, depending on the size of the reducer it can act as a capping agent to produce nanoparticles of copper. The lignin from the plants I suppose will also act as a capping agent to make nanoparticles so if you want to control the size filter the reducer solution. It will also work for a metal that has higher reduction potential than copper.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standard_electrode_potential_(data_page)

[product] [metal salt] [reducer] [conditions]
Cu CuNO3 Thymus 5min @60C
Cu CuCl2 barberry fruit 10min@atp
Cu CuSO4 brocolli 24h@60C
Cu CuNO32 ginger 15min@80C
CuO CuOAc2 pomengranate peels 10min@atp
Cu CuOAc2 pseudomargarita eclipta 24h@atp
Cu CuOAc2 glucose + cysteine 80C
Cu - Plantago asiatica  30min@atp
CuO CuNO32 Coffee 12h@75C
Cu CuCl2 Calotropis Procera 45@50C



[Edited on 23-10-2018 by gatosgr]

[Edited on 23-10-2018 by gatosgr]




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BaFuxa
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[*] posted on 24-10-2018 at 10:41


Nice thanks ! I have never thought of using plants directly. I presume the ascorbic acid is the "functional" molecule in most of them.





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[*] posted on 24-10-2018 at 11:07


Quote: Originally posted by BaFuxa  
Nice thanks ! I have never thought of using plants directly. I presume the ascorbic acid is the "functional" molecule in most of them.


Or glucose etc.
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AJKOER
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[*] posted on 19-11-2018 at 10:22


Using flowers is truly a `green´ approach.

Curiously, what is the intended application of the created nano copper?

My recollection is that copper ions are already toxic to microbes, .., in extremely small doses, but not people, so a value added question.

However nano particles, in general, likely present a longer term danger to people.
--------------------------------
Did learn something, per a source to quote:

"The importance of copper nanoparticles compared to other metal nanoparticles are due to the high conductivity. Methods for synthesis of copper nanoparticles, including green protocols using plants and microorganisms compared chemical methods, have also been reviewed."

From 'Synthesis, Characterization, and Applications of Copper Nanoparticles' link: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/303504124_Synthesis... .

Also per http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.457... quote:

"Copper nanoparticles have attracted considerable interest because of their optical, catalytic, mechanical and electrical properties, resulting in a wide range of applications in the field of metallurgy, catalysis, nano- and optoelectronics [1–4]."

Another application concerns anti-microbial coatings, see, for example, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4537522/ .

[Edited on 19-11-2018 by AJKOER]
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