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Chemcraft
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[*] posted on 2-5-2021 at 09:54
Hg salts for sale


We started selling some mercury salts to overseas buyers. The following materials are now available for orders:

Mercury(II) oxide yellow, 99%

Mercury(II) oxide red, 99%

Mercury(I) nitrate dihydrate 98% pure p.a.

Mercury(II) bromide 99.5% pure p.a.

Mercury(II) acetate, 98%


More mercury reagents will appear in the near future.

Hg(CH3COO)2 -2.png - 1.8MB Hg2(NO3)2 x2H2O  -2.png - 2.9MB
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Antiswat
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[*] posted on 3-5-2021 at 06:29


your site is like a chemical museum and the prices are reasonable even for small amounts- bookmarked for sure.



~25 drops = 1mL @dH2O viscocity - STP
Truth is ever growing - but without context theres barely any such.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solubility_table
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Chemcraft
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[*] posted on 3-5-2021 at 07:13


Thank you.

By the end of May, we plan to start selling liquid materials, such as high-purity mineral acids and some basic organic reagents (for example, aniline, anisole, simple carboxylic acids and etc.).
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Fyndium
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[*] posted on 4-5-2021 at 05:05


Just out of curiosity, what kind of restrictions are there for chemicals in Russia?
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njl
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[*] posted on 4-5-2021 at 05:30


Quote: Originally posted by Chemcraft  
Thank you.

By the end of May, we plan to start selling liquid materials, such as high-purity mineral acids and some basic organic reagents (for example, aniline, anisole, simple carboxylic acids and etc.).


I can't wait! Please be safe though, your services are so valuable here it would be a shame if some technicality got you shut down. That sounded like a mafia threat but I promise I mean well :)




Reflux condenser?? I barely know her!
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Chemcraft
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[*] posted on 4-5-2021 at 14:47


Quote: Originally posted by Fyndium  
Just out of curiosity, what kind of restrictions are there for chemicals in Russia?


There are four types of restrictions in Russia. Prohibition on the sale of radioactive metals and their salts (inc. uranium, thorium). Prohibition of the sale of precious metals and their salts (but this is easily eliminated. You only need to obtain a license. This is done quickly enough and costs about $ 100 - a state fee). Prohibition on the sale of poisonous substances. These include all thallium salts, cyanides (excluding complex cyanides), arsenic compounds (but metallic arsenic is allowed for sale!), metallic mercury and white phosphorus. Also prohibited are precursors of narcotic substances, such as acetic anhydride, phenylacetic acid, benzylacetone, etc. Everything else is permitted.

P.S. There are also restrictions on the sale of concentrated sulfuric, hydrochloric and glacial acetic acid to individuals. But these restrictions apply only to the identification of the buyer. Anyone can buy these acids by presenting a passport. If you do not cook drugs, then this does not interfere with the practice of amateur chemistry. :D

[Edited on 4-5-2021 by Chemcraft]
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Fyndium
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[*] posted on 4-5-2021 at 23:33


Thanks for the info!

I've seen flasks of mercury being sold in some Russian site. Do they supply them to companies?
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Chemcraft
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[*] posted on 5-5-2021 at 03:57


To buy metallic mercury you need to have a special license. Only a licensed company can buy. Their Hg costs about $ 20-25 per kg.
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katyushaslab
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[*] posted on 5-5-2021 at 11:06


> Only a licensed company can buy. Their Hg costs about $ 20-25 per kg.

Is there any further information available on the kind of permits an overseas company would need to buy mercury at this price? That is orders of magnitude cheaper than domestic suppliers here...
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Chemcraft
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[*] posted on 5-5-2021 at 13:23


Quote: Originally posted by katyushaslab  
> Only a licensed company can buy. Their Hg costs about $ 20-25 per kg.

Is there any further information available on the kind of permits an overseas company would need to buy mercury at this price? That is orders of magnitude cheaper than domestic suppliers here...


I cannot say anything about the purchase of mercury by a foreign company. You need to write directly to the seller.
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[*] posted on 6-5-2021 at 06:45


However, one could easily reduce one of those oxides of mercury to the metal. There is a manometer I have been wanting to buy, also coincidentally from Russia, but it would need to be filled.

I would like to point out that having metallic mercury transported by aircraft can put the aluminum aircraft at risk in the case that it leaks.
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[*] posted on 6-5-2021 at 11:29


Quote: Originally posted by Jenks  
However, one could easily reduce one of those oxides of mercury to the metal. There is a manometer I have been wanting to buy, also coincidentally from Russia, but it would need to be filled.

I would like to point out that having metallic mercury transported by aircraft can put the aluminum aircraft at risk in the case that it leaks.


To get metal you just need to heat the oxide to 400-450°C. Pure metal will be distilled. This is best done in a quartz glass vessel. The decomposition proceeds rather quickly.
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[*] posted on 6-5-2021 at 11:41


Quote: Originally posted by Chemcraft  

To get metal you just need to heat the oxide to 400-450°C. Pure metal will be distilled. This is best done in a quartz glass vessel. The decomposition proceeds rather quickly.


I can add I’m very satisfied with the iodine and lithium I ordered from you last year.

I would, however, advise against distilling Hg. Hg has a pretty high vapour pressure, and distilling it means venting Hg gas everywhere around, unless very special provisions are taken (efficient traps, etc.). Definitely something not to be attempted, unless by someone equipped with top-tier items and solid experience.


[Edited on 6-5-2021 by Keras]
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[*] posted on 6-5-2021 at 11:51


Quote: Originally posted by Keras  
Quote: Originally posted by Chemcraft  

To get metal you just need to heat the oxide to 400-450°C. Pure metal will be distilled. This is best done in a quartz glass vessel. The decomposition proceeds rather quickly.


I can add I’m very satisfied with the iodine and lithium I ordered from you last year.

I would, however, advise against distilling Hg. Hg has a pretty high vapour pressure, and distilling it means venting Hg gas everywhere around, unless very special provisions are taken (efficient traps, etc.). Definitely something not to be attempted, unless by someone equipped with top-tier items and solid experience.


[Edited on 6-5-2021 by Keras]


I absolutely agree with this! First of all you need to observe accident prevention.

[Edited on 6-5-2021 by Chemcraft]
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[*] posted on 6-5-2021 at 12:16


Could you, Chemcraft, obtain such a license to supply flasks of mercury? The cost of 25$/kg would bring the 34kg flask price to 850$ + fees.

NileRed vacuum distilled mercury, and his cold trap had little to none condensed mercury carryover. So, even though vapor pressure is high, it is still extremely low compared to anything we consider volatile, like ether, that just escapes, no matter what you do, except from a sealed ampoule. Based on that info, I wouldn't hesitate vaccing mercury at any time, if I had the need. Inorganic mercury has half-life of around 70 days, and the major toxicity is caused by acute poisoning or prolonged exposure. Having mercury residues all over your house's structures is such an instance you want to avoid.

Quote: Originally posted by Jenks  
I would like to point out that having metallic mercury transported by aircraft can put the aluminum aircraft at risk in the case that it leaks.


I wonder if there were ever an instance of someone cooking meth in an airplane? Rolling meth lab is now airborne. Mile high reductions club, bitch. :D
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[*] posted on 6-5-2021 at 12:21


Quote: Originally posted by Fyndium  
Could you, Chemcraft, obtain such a license to supply flasks of mercury? The cost of 25$/kg would bring the 34kg flask price to 850$ + fees.


Unfortunately we do not have a license for metallic mercury. It is very difficult to do this, there are a lot of safety requirements.
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[*] posted on 6-5-2021 at 23:04


Quote: Originally posted by Fyndium  
NileRed vacuum distilled mercury, and his cold trap had little to none condensed mercury carryover. So, even though vapor pressure is high, it is still extremely low compared to anything we consider volatile, like ether, that just escapes, no matter what you do, except from a sealed ampoule.


I know about this video, but that assumes no leak in the joints, ability to make an efficient cold trap, etc., let alone risks that the RBF or the setup breaks due to bumping + high density of Hg. I’m sure there are better ways to purify Hg than distillation.

After air has been bubbled through mercury for several hours to oxidise metallic impurities, it is filtered to remove coarser particles of oxide and dirt, then sprayed through a 4-ft column containing 10% HNO3. It is washed with distilled water, dried with filter paper and distilled under vacuum. [Schenk in Handbook of Preparative Inorganic Chemistry, Vol I p 8 (1963)] I’m sure you can dispense with the last step, and you can drip it directly into a bottle containing dilute nitric acid.

I thought Hg had become very cheap. Demand for it has plummeted due to its banishment from most measuring apparatuses, and most of it is now safely and cleanly recycled, leading to a mass surplus. Must've heard incorrectly.


[Edited on 7-5-2021 by Keras]
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[*] posted on 7-5-2021 at 05:44


Quote: Originally posted by Chemcraft  
[
Prohibition on the sale of poisonous substances. These include all thallium salts, cyanides (excluding complex cyanides), arsenic compounds


So, I can't expect to find Hg chloride family in your web?
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[*] posted on 7-5-2021 at 05:55


Quote: Originally posted by pneumatician  
Quote: Originally posted by Chemcraft  
[
Prohibition on the sale of poisonous substances. These include all thallium salts, cyanides (excluding complex cyanides), arsenic compounds


So, I can't expect to find Hg chloride family in your web?


Chlorides will be in a week. We will publish iodide HgI2 and thiocyanate Hg(SCN)2 today.
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[*] posted on 8-5-2021 at 04:24


Quote: Originally posted by Keras  

I thought Hg had become very cheap. Demand for it has plummeted due to its banishment from most measuring apparatuses, and most of it is now safely and cleanly recycled, leading to a mass surplus. Must've heard incorrectly.


That's pretty much the reason. It is not a commodity anymore, so anyone wanting it will either want analytical grade or will be ready to pay premium if someone has got some. The repository mercury is in sulfide form, and is not for sale, instead it is sealed in bedrock vaults with bentonite and concrete.
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