Sciencemadness Discussion Board
Not logged in [Login ]
Go To Bottom

Printable Version  
 Pages:  1  2
Author: Subject: The mad chemist's guide to mushroom hunting
Morgan
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1510
Registered: 28-12-2010
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 14-8-2013 at 09:02


Here's an odd mushroom I noticed today while walking the dog. I didn't see any photos that looked similar to it when searching bleeding mushrooms in Google. My dog took an interest in it momentarily, stopping and smelling it for a few seconds.

001.JPG - 232kB

[Edited on 14-8-2013 by Morgan]

006.JPG - 257kB
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bfesser
Resident Wikipedian
*****




Posts: 2114
Registered: 29-1-2008
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 14-8-2013 at 09:14


I saw these <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morchella" target="_blank">morels</a> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png" /> growing in <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interstate_Park" target="_blank">Interstate Park</a> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png" /> (MN side) while attending a field geology lecture with a friend. Nobody else in the group had noticed them, and when I went back to snap a photo as evidence, they were gone. Apparently, they had all been picked by a couple of mushroom hunters who were kind enough to let me take this picture.

<table><tr><td>Morchella esculenta (yellow morel).jpg - 419kB</td></tr><tr><td align="center"><em><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morchella_esculenta" target="_blank">Morchella esculenta</a></em> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png" /><br />yellow morel</td></tr></table>
[edit] I found more while walking around my neighborhood this afternoon (sorry for overexposure & wonky focus, all I had was my phone camera).

<table><tr><td>fungus_3.1.jpg - 680kB</td><td>fungus_3.2.jpg - 601kB</td><td>fungus_3.3.jpg - 520kB</td></tr><tr><td align="center" colspan="3"><em><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boletinellus_merulioides" target="_blank">Gyrodon merulioides</a></em> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png" /><br />ash bolete</td></tr></table>
<table><tr><td valign="bottom">fungus_1.jpg - 477kB</td><td>fungus_2.jpg - 577kB</tr><tr><td align="center" colspan="2">unidentified</td></tr></table>
<table><tr><td>fungus_4.jpg - 578kB</td><td>fungi_5.jpg - 765kB</td></tr><tr><td align="center" colspan="2">unidentified</td></tr></table>
<table><tr><td>fungus_6.1.jpg - 402kB</td><td valign="bottom">fungus_6.2.jpg - 413kB</td></tr><tr><td align="center" colspan="2">unidentified</td></tr></table>

[Edited on 15.8.13 by bfesser]




View user's profile View All Posts By User
bfesser
Resident Wikipedian
*****




Posts: 2114
Registered: 29-1-2008
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 18-8-2013 at 12:56
More Mushrooms


<table><tr><td>DSCN1270.JPG - 470kB</td><td>DSCN1271.JPG - 477kB</td><td>DSCN1272.JPG - 489kB</td></tr><tr><td align="center" colspan="3">identification pending</td></tr></table>

<table><tr><td>DSCN1349.JPG - 647kB</td><td>DSCN1350.JPG - 510kB</td></tr><tr><td align="center" colspan="2">unidentified</td></tr></table>




View user's profile View All Posts By User
Morgan
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1510
Registered: 28-12-2010
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 28-4-2015 at 15:03


I took some photos of a blue mushroom growing under this kraken looking tree today. The inky indigo color was kind of pretty. Maybe if you were in a culinary mindset you could plate a meal with blue spots or fancy drizzle patterns around the dish to dress it up for something different or avant-garde.

"Although L. indigo is a well-known edible species, opinions vary on its desirability. For example, American mycologist David Arora considers it a "superior edible",[9] while a field guide on Kansas fungi rates it as "mediocre in quality"

"The flesh is pallid to bluish in color, slowly turning greenish after being exposed to air ..."

"(7-Isopropenyl-4-methylazulen-1-yl)methyl stearate, the blue lipophilic azulene pigment from L. indigo. The part of the molecule responsible for its color (chromophore) is highlighted in blue."
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lactarius_indigo

020.JPG - 306kB014.JPG - 195kB024.JPG - 240kB034.JPG - 285kB044.JPG - 138kB061.JPG - 117kB
View user's profile View All Posts By User
violet sin
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1339
Registered: 2-9-2012
Location: Back yard staring at stars
Member Is Offline

Mood: Good

[*] posted on 28-4-2015 at 17:02


nice, I find those and the indigo clitocybe ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clitocybe_nuda ) around here. about a week ago I found a solitary yellow foot chanterelle way out of season. Some of the large "sweet tooth" hedgehog's are still going under the eucalyptus trees. also seemingly way out of season here. every year I take a hundred or more pic's on my food gathering quests. some from this last season...
1.jpg - 229kB 2.jpg - 412kB 3.jpg - 198kB
4.jpg - 185kB 5.jpg - 235kB 6.jpg - 56kB
7.jpg - 149kB
8.jpg - 170kB
1) clock wise from top left,.. yellow foot chanterelle- Craterellus tubaeformis( big diagonal stripe), hedgehog mushroom- Hydnum repandum, golden chanterelle -Cantharellus cibarius, king bolete- Boletus edulis, candy caps -Lactarius fragilis
2) prince mushrooms - Agaricus augustus
3) strawberries and cream- Hydnellum peckii
4) my son in his stroller with a bunch of white matsutake in the bottom- Tricholoma magnivelare
5) gold chanterelle's from a jobsite, Cantharellus cibarius
6) me with some white matsutake's picked after work- Tricholoma magnivelare
7) yellow foot chanterelle's- Craterellus tubaeformis
8) big box-o-matsutake's - Tricholoma magnivelare


[Edited on 29-4-2015 by violet sin]
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Morgan
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1510
Registered: 28-12-2010
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 28-4-2015 at 18:11


I don't know very much about mushrooms. One time I picked some morels on a farm in Illinois and I can't forget how good they tasted. Here's a few tidbits on the Lactarius indigos I dug up today.

"Habitat and conservation: Grows scattered or in groups on soil in oak and pine woods. The color of this mushroom is very unusual, so when you see a blue mushroom that literally "bleeds blue," it is almost certainly an indigo milky."
"Status: An excellent edible. Add this mushroom to scrambled eggs, and they'll turn green!"
"Ecosystem connections: This is one of many fungus species that help nourish forest trees through symbiosis. The netlike fibers of the fungus cover the surface of a tree’s roots, increasing the surface area and the roots’ ability to absorb water and nutrients. In return, the tree shares nutrients with the fungus."
http://mdc.mo.gov/discover-nature/field-guide/indigo-milky

Some good photos here with a nice expose'.
http://www.tyrantfarms.com/a-delicious-indigo-milk-cap-recip...

Here is a caution about a possible look-alike and another somewhat blue mushroom Clitocybe - one that you mentioned seeing. Looks like you have a bounty with your foraging skills. There's a lot of fun facts about mushrooms to be sure. Thanks for sharing.
http://botit.botany.wisc.edu/toms_fungi/june2000.html

"There are at least eleven purple Cortinarius species, including C. violaceus, C. alboviolaceus and C. traganus. Cortinarius species should never be eaten, primarily because they have not been fully studied for toxins. More than sixty species of Cortinarius have been found to contain orellanine, a toxic cyclopeptide that causes serious damage to the kidneys, but only after a very long latent period; the first symptoms do not appear until 2-14 days after the mushroom has been eaten. About 15% of reported cases have been fatal. So you should be absolutely sure of what you are eating before you try Clitocybe nuda-- always make spore prints!!!"
http://botit.botany.wisc.edu/toms_fungi/nov98.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Cortinarius_species#/me...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Cortinarius_species#/me...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Cortinarius_species
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cortinarius


[Edited on 29-4-2015 by Morgan]
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Morgan
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1510
Registered: 28-12-2010
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 4-5-2015 at 09:56


I found the indigo mushroom again, this time on some bluffs near the bay. It was surrounded by oak leaves which I cleared away for this first photo. The stem was very short so it was hard to lift without damaging the gills. With all the leaves, the mushroom didn't really stand out and might have gone unnoticed.

036.JPG - 211kB044.JPG - 183kB046.JPG - 125kB006.JPG - 224kB010.JPG - 230kB058.JPG - 140kB
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Loptr
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1298
Registered: 20-5-2014
Location: USA
Member Is Offline

Mood: Grateful

[*] posted on 4-5-2015 at 10:24


These are very nice pictures, guys! I never got into the mushroom hunting thing, although I have read a little bit about them.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Morgan
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1510
Registered: 28-12-2010
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 5-5-2015 at 06:21


As an aside, I thought it of note that there was an ammonia leak long ago not very far from where I took these pictures. The day of mushroom hunting I saw this train go by and thought about the incident. It's just a story I heard about. Perhaps this should be a new thread - Closely Watched Trains.

"The Thorshov story began on November 9, 1977. Dr. Jon Thorshov, a thirty-eight-year-old physician, his wife, his four-year-old daughter, and his one-year-old son were at their home in Pensacola when a massive freight train operated by L&N derailed near their home and released anhydrous ammonia. The family attempted to escape their home, but were overcome by the fumes. Dr. and Ms. Thorshov died, and both children sustained serious physical injuries."
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fred_Levin

"The train was carrying a toxic chemical called anhydrous ammonia. Two tanks of the ammonia were punctured in the crash, sending lethal doses of poison gas into the atmosphere."
"The derailment occurred 40 yards from the Thorshov’s home. In addition to Dr. Thorshov’s death, each member of the family was seriously injured. Sadly, they had only lived in their house for one month before the accident."
http://inweekly.net/wordpress/?p=4068




014.JPG - 204kB
View user's profile View All Posts By User
 Pages:  1  2

  Go To Top