Sciencemadness Discussion Board
Not logged in [Login ]
Go To Bottom

Printable Version  
Author: Subject: Calcium carbonate solution
bolbol
Hazard to Others
***




Posts: 162
Registered: 3-1-2015
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 4-7-2016 at 17:51
Calcium carbonate solution


I would like to know whether or not a perfectly saturated solution of calcium carbonate would react with the water to form calcium hydroxide if left for over a month?
View user's profile View All Posts By User
blogfast25
Thought-provoking Teacher
*****




Posts: 10334
Registered: 3-2-2008
Location: Old Blighty
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 4-7-2016 at 18:15


CaCO3 is of course very poorly soluble. Due to hydrolysis of the carbonate ion, such a solution contains also hydroxide ions in low concentration.

This doesn't take much time to achieve, in fact it's almost instantaneous. But a solution of Ca(OH)2 this does not make.

Some more information, here:

http://www.sciencemadness.org/talk/viewthread.php?tid=65303#...




View user's profile Visit user's homepage View All Posts By User
bolbol
Hazard to Others
***




Posts: 162
Registered: 3-1-2015
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 4-7-2016 at 19:37


Is there anyway I can precipitate out calcium carbonate and also magnesium carbonate from a solution? What sort of solution would I need?
View user's profile View All Posts By User
j_sum1
Administrator
********




Posts: 5493
Registered: 4-10-2014
Location: Oz
Member Is Offline

Mood: Taking opportunities to breathe.

[*] posted on 4-7-2016 at 22:07


Quote: Originally posted by bolbol  
Is there anyway I can precipitate out calcium carbonate and also magnesium carbonate from a solution? What sort of solution would I need?

Not 100% sure what your question is but...

If you begin with a soluble calcium salt or magnesium salt in solution, (CaCl2, MgCl2 springs to mind) and then add a solution of a soluble carbonate (KCO3 or NaCO3) then you will indeed get a precipitate of CaCO3 or MgCO3.

This is the classic double substitution reaction. It is one of the most useful ways of separating ionic species.

Be warned, the carbonates formed will be extremely fine and will clog up any filtering equipment you care to use. Mest to let it settle for however long it takes (perhaps days) and then decant the clear liquid off the top.




View user's profile View All Posts By User
bolbol
Hazard to Others
***




Posts: 162
Registered: 3-1-2015
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 4-7-2016 at 22:44


No I don't want this to involve any chemical reactions. I just want to take a solution of those carbonates and precipitate them out onto something else by using evaporation.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
j_sum1
Administrator
********




Posts: 5493
Registered: 4-10-2014
Location: Oz
Member Is Offline

Mood: Taking opportunities to breathe.

[*] posted on 4-7-2016 at 23:43


Well, yes. If you evaporate the water you will be left with your carbonates. They will appear as a thin white dusty film on the surface of your container.
That should not be surprising.

Let me reiterate that MgCO3 and CaCO3 are really quite insoluble -- 0.00106 g/L and 0.013 g/L respectively at 25°C. (Wikipedia)
Making a solution will be painful. And when you recover the material you won't get much.

What is it that you are really trying to do?




View user's profile View All Posts By User
bolbol
Hazard to Others
***




Posts: 162
Registered: 3-1-2015
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 5-7-2016 at 07:33


But if the carbonates react with the water won't I be left with the hydroxides of calcium and magnesium at the end?

I am trying to deposit it onto different kinds of calcite which is calcium carbonate itself and observe any differences with different ratios and quantities of the carbonates involved and maybe some other things depending on how it all turns out
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bolbol
Hazard to Others
***




Posts: 162
Registered: 3-1-2015
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 5-7-2016 at 07:37


But if the carbonates react with the water won't I be left with the hydroxides of calcium and magnesium at the end?

I am trying to deposit it onto different kinds of calcite which is calcium carbonate itself and observe any differences with different ratios and quantities of the carbonates involved and maybe some other things depending on how it all turns out.

Edit: The calcium carbonate solubility you wrote is per every 100 mLs. At room temperature 12-15 mgs should dissolve in a liter
View user's profile View All Posts By User
blogfast25
Thought-provoking Teacher
*****




Posts: 10334
Registered: 3-2-2008
Location: Old Blighty
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 5-7-2016 at 08:44


Quote: Originally posted by bolbol  
But if the carbonates react with the water won't I be left with the hydroxides of calcium and magnesium at the end?

I am trying to deposit it onto different kinds of calcite which is calcium carbonate itself and observe any differences with different ratios and quantities of the carbonates involved and maybe some other things depending on how it all turns out.



No. Just like when you crystallise a soluble carbonate (like Na2CO3), CaCO3 will crystallise out.





View user's profile Visit user's homepage View All Posts By User
bolbol
Hazard to Others
***




Posts: 162
Registered: 3-1-2015
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 5-7-2016 at 09:44


I have heard that the carbonate reacts with the partialy ionized water to make carbon dioxide and calcium hydroxide. For my application it's important that nothing is in the water besides the calcium/magnesium carbonate.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Boffis
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1626
Registered: 1-5-2011
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 5-7-2016 at 11:00


When water comes in contact with calcite (natural calcium carbonate) the pH rises due to the equilibrium:

2CaCO<sub>3</sub> + 2H<sub>2</sub>O &rarr; Ca(HCO<sub>3</sub>;)<sub>2</sub> + Ca(OH)<sub>2</sub>

The later substance makes the solution alkaline. However, the equilibrium lies a long way to the left and the concentration of the components on the right is very low, this is merely a hydrolysis reaction. This reaction will not progress further and the resulting solution will absorb CO2, if give the oppurtunity, pushing it further to the right by mopping up the hydroxide ions; there is no way you are going to get CO2 evolved. Calcium bicarbonate is produced and it is much more soluble then calcium carbonate which is why hard water can contain 200mg/l of calcium or more.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Artemus Gordon
Hazard to Others
***




Posts: 178
Registered: 1-8-2013
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 11-7-2016 at 15:04


If you are looking for a source of CaOH, find a Mexican supermarket if you can. In the spice section they sell a pure white powder called 'cal'. This is food grade CaOH that is used to turn dry corn kernels into hominy.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
halogen
National Hazard
****




Posts: 372
Registered: 18-4-2004
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 11-7-2016 at 19:34


I believe it's a geological experiment.



F. de Lalande and M. Prud'homme showed that a mixture of boric oxide and sodium chloride is decomposed in a stream of dry air or oxygen at a red heat with the evolution of chlorine.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Ozone
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1269
Registered: 28-7-2005
Location: Good Olde USA
Member Is Offline

Mood: Integrated

[*] posted on 11-7-2016 at 20:28


Even if you were to get hydroxide (which as you now know is strongly disfavored), it will scrounge CO2 from the air to give you the carbonate. For example, a 50% w/w solution of NaOH stirred in air will develop insoluble (in 50% NaOH) sodium carbonate quite quickly (a huge pain in the ass if you are doing ion chromatography--this is why we prefer to keep NaOH eluents under He or to use an electrochemical eluent generator). Lime water, even faster (apparently) due to the extreme insolubility of the calcium carbonate.

I suppose one could deposit a calcium hydroxide layer (from milk of lime) under CO2.

O3




-Anyone who never made a mistake never tried anything new.
--Albert Einstein
View user's profile View All Posts By User

  Go To Top