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Author: Subject: Melting sulfur in mineral oil
symboom
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[*] posted on 15-8-2018 at 12:21
Melting sulfur in mineral oil


Just as the title says can you use a high temperatire solvent to melt sulfur and have it crystalize



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MrHomeScientist
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[*] posted on 15-8-2018 at 12:26


As long as it doesn't dissolve or react with the solvent I don't see why not. Another route is to dissolve it in hot toluene and grow crystals by slow cooling of the liquid.
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DJF90
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[*] posted on 15-8-2018 at 12:32


Sulfur reacts with mineral oil at high temperatures to generate alkenes and hydrogen sulfide. Stick with toluene or xylene for recrystallisation
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symboom
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[*] posted on 15-8-2018 at 12:33


Toulene cant be found anywhere where i am at. And the less flamabillity the better i am using an alcohol stove

[Edited on 15-8-2018 by symboom]
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MrHomeScientist
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[*] posted on 15-8-2018 at 12:36


Quote: Originally posted by DJF90  
Sulfur reacts with mineral oil at high temperatures to generate alkenes and hydrogen sulfide. Stick with toluene or xylene for recrystallisation

What's considered a high temperature, though? Sulfur melts at only 115 C.
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Fulmen
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[*] posted on 15-8-2018 at 12:45


I have achieved this in rape seed oil when experimenting with sulphurised oils for lubrication. At lower temperatures (probably right around the melting point) sulfur simply dissolved, precipitating out again upon cooling with little discoloration of the oil. At slightly increased time and temperatures it reacts to form a dark oil from no precipitation occurs. There could be an upper limit to how much sulfur that can react, but I never went past 10%.



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Foeskes
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[*] posted on 16-8-2018 at 02:31


I did this a while back, didn't seem to generate any H2S for some reason. A tiny percent of the sulfur dissolved though and formed some nice crystals.
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barbs09
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[*] posted on 16-8-2018 at 03:15


Maybe don't use paraffin wax!!

http://www.prepchem.com/synthesis-of-hydrogen-sulfide/
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[*] posted on 30-8-2018 at 13:37


Here's a crystallization from Xylenes.

I will never tire of watching these form.

S_1.jpg - 99kB
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