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Author: Subject: Help me choose a cool experiment
p3t3r1
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[*] posted on 21-1-2008 at 12:18
Help me choose a cool experiment


Hello guys, my chemistry course in university is holding a project in which one could do any experiment they want, as long it is safe. (of course, you have to write up a fairly comprehensive lab report)

They are providing all the chemicals and equipment you need. They are so many choices.. I am like a kid in a candy store, everything looks delicious. Can someone give some cool experiment I can try?

Of course, it has to be on par with my level. I am a first year science freshman. I also need to be write up a pretty good lab report for it. It also has to be pretty cool (yeah, cool is different for everyone but as long you think is cool, is a good choice) and safe (no explosive, biochemical weapons etc..) Can anyone provide some suggestions? Thanks alot.

Oh, I only get 2 hrs to do my experiment... so there is a time limit factor too.

[Edited on 21-1-2008 by p3t3r1]
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microcosmicus
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[*] posted on 21-1-2008 at 12:29


Maybe an oscillating reaction?
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Ozone
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[*] posted on 21-1-2008 at 12:38


My recent conversation on another thread which involved carbohydrates made me think of this reaction:

http://chemed.chem.purdue.edu/demos/demosheets/19.1.html

Cheap, easy to do, striking in demonstration format...and...as theoretically intensive as you care to make it (REDOX, dyes, carbohydrates, etc.).

Some more input, as well as other colors (different dyes) can be had here:

http://chemistry.about.com/od/chemistrydemonstrations/ss/blu...


Cheers,

O3

[Edited on 21-1-2008 by Ozone]




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p3t3r1
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[*] posted on 21-1-2008 at 12:51


Hey those looks pretty cool. Is the blue bottle experiment an oscillating reaction?

Any more recommendations? I need to choose 4 for my TA. He will pick 1 of the 4 that he thinks is the best.
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[*] posted on 21-1-2008 at 13:12


Fluorescein (synthesis and demonstration of its fluorescence of course)? Should make a nice lab report! (FYI: http://81.207.88.128/science/chem/exps/fluorescence/index.html, by Woelen)



[Edite le 21-1-2008 par Sobrero]




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microcosmicus
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[*] posted on 21-1-2008 at 13:27


Of course, anything from that website would qualify as a cool experiment
because woelen is a cool guy ;)

Along those lines, there's also making singlet oxygen. Pretty easy to
do (Cl2 + H2O2) but not only cool to watch the glow, but cool for deeper
reasons --- nice little bit of quantum mechanics.

[Edited on 21-1-2008 by microcosmicus]
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Ozone
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[*] posted on 21-1-2008 at 21:25


The blue bottle "oscillates" when O2 is introduced to solution by shaking. This allows for, say, "punctuation" when explaining the experiment.:)

Cheers,

O3




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[*] posted on 22-1-2008 at 11:27


As long as you are not paying for the chemicals, maybe do something with precious-metal solutions (Pt, Au, …)….but I doubt the teacher will appreciate the suggestion very much.

But seriously, I would choose a reaction I would not ordinarily be able to do on an amateur scale, something which involves chemicals / apparati which are too expensive, rare, difficult, …, to acquire for an individual but you would have access to through the university.
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[*] posted on 22-1-2008 at 13:05


Quote:
Originally posted by Ozone

Cheap, easy to do, striking in demonstration format...and...as theoretically intensive as you care to make it (REDOX, dyes, carbohydrates, etc.).

[Edited on 21-1-2008 by Ozone]


The fact that it's a carbohydrate doesn't matter. It is the fact that it's an aldehyde that counts, as an aldehyde has reducing properties :)




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[*] posted on 22-1-2008 at 21:27


https://sciencemadness.org/talk/viewthread.php?tid=5390

Always amuses me, just use pure tin wire as opposed to the alloy I used, it will simplify your report greatly.
Anything with electrochem is always fun.

If its their equipment, I have always wanted to try a microscale arkel-de-boer zirconium purification, but the amperages involved may qualify it as 'dangerous'.

Synthesis of p-nitroacetanilide followed by the 'pharoh's serpent' demonstration.
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woelen
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[*] posted on 22-1-2008 at 23:57


Quote:
Originally posted by microcosmicus
those lines, there's also making singlet oxygen. Pretty easy to
do (Cl2 + H2O2) but not only cool to watch the glow, but cool for deeper
reasons --- nice little bit of quantum mechanics.

It can be done even easier. Just pouring some 30% H2O2 over crushed swimming pool chlorine tablets or granules. It works with calcium hypochlorite, but also with the organic 'chlorine' like TCCA or Na-DCCA.

http://woelen.scheikunde.net/science/chem/exps/chemlum/index...

This is what you may expect to see in a completely darkened room:





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[*] posted on 23-1-2008 at 14:31


Today I did another simple chemistry experiment (can perfectly be done at high schools, but many members probably can do it at home as well):

http://woelen.scheikunde.net/science/chem/exps/NO_O2/index.h...

A nice experiment, with a reaction completely in the gas phase.




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[*] posted on 23-1-2008 at 15:12


Woelen, you have an incredible gift for producing striking, educational and beautiful demonstrations. Thank you once again!
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p3t3r1
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[*] posted on 24-1-2008 at 18:49


Hey thanks for the great ideas. I think I have enough.
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