Sciencemadness Discussion Board

Weird Names...

ScienceHideout - 11-10-2011 at 12:12

Are there any weird names you've heard of for chemicals, or weird names you call chemicals?

For example- There is a carboxilyic acid that's called moronic acid, really. Also, I call potassium hexacyanidoferrate III potassium ferricyanide. It isn't that wierd for older chemists... but for me, being 14, you almost always hear chemists of similar age saying the long way...

[Edited on 11-10-2011 by ScienceHideout]

[Edited on 11-10-2011 by ScienceHideout]

[Edited on 11-10-2011 by ScienceHideout]

Lambda-Eyde - 11-10-2011 at 12:46

My favourite is diethyl diazocarboxylate, which is known as "DEADCAT".

AndersHoveland - 11-10-2011 at 12:54

I find it somewhat amusing that the compound known as "theobromine" does not actually contain any bromine atoms. The formula is: C7H8N4O2

The compound known as "nickel peroxide" is actually nickel dioxide. Whereas barium peroxide was once commonly referred to as "barium dioxide".

And KClO4 is referred to as perchlorate, although it does not contain any oxygen-oxygen bonds.

For chains of three oxygen atoms there is also inexplicable naming. H2O3 is known as dihydrogen trioxide, whereas when there are organic groups instead of the two hydrogen atoms, such compounds are known as ozonides. But KO3 is also an "ozonide". So apparently the chain of three oxygen atoms is more important for the naming than the actual oxidation states.

A good name was never given to ferrate(VI) or to the unstable ferrate (VIII), presumably because "ferrate" is so common and has come to mean iron in the +3 oxidation state, for example the solid compound NaFeO2. Sometimes when different oxidation states are discovered much later, it can play havok on the naming systems already established.

The explosive known as tetrazene was previously referred to in the old literature as "tetracene". But the word "tetracene" has now come to refer to the four-ringed aromatic hydrocarbon also known as naphthacene.

The compound known as potassium triiodide contains I3[-] ions, whereas the structure of "nitrogen triiodide" is completely different. Actually, to be more technically accurate, NI3 should be known as triiodine nitride. In any case, the substance commonly known as "nitrogen triiodide" actually has the composition NI3*NH3, which exists in polymerized chains.

Whereas the triiodide ion is named directly after its element, N3[-] has its own name, the azide ion, rather than "trinitride".
Why is KO2 known as superoxide rather than "dioxygenide"?

Then there are the "fulminating" compounds, which include a variety of different metal salts, but which should not be confused with the fulminates, which contain the CNO[-] anion.

[Edited on 11-10-2011 by AndersHoveland]

ScienceHideout - 11-10-2011 at 12:57

A zwitterion is a molecule with an anion and cation!

Lambda-Eyde - 11-10-2011 at 13:22

Since this is a science forum, I want to bring to your attention that "Tightness of a classical Wiener space" and "Classical Wiener measure" are terms that actually make sense in the field of mathematics.

fledarmus - 11-10-2011 at 13:35

Don't forget putrescine and cadaverine, which smell just like you would expect them to smell.

Dr.Bob - 12-10-2011 at 06:07

Quote: Originally posted by ScienceHideout  
Are there any weird names you've heard of for chemicals, or weird names you call chemicals?

For example- There is a carboxilyic acid that's called moronic acid, really.


Silly me, I thought you were taking us for a bunch of morons, but you really are correct on that one.

I always liked the NanoPutians:

http://pubs.acs.org/doi/full/10.1021/jo0349227

J. Org. Chem., 2003, 68 (23), pp 8750–8766
DOI: 10.1021/jo0349227

and as they mentioned, “housane” and “buckminsterfullerene” which both refer to complex 3 dimensional molecules which look like a house and a geodesic sphere ( or a soccer ball, so if someone who played soccer had made it it might have been "soccerane" or 'footballane" if outside the US)


[Edited on 12-10-2011 by Dr.Bob]

mr.crow - 12-10-2011 at 07:27

Quote: Originally posted by ScienceHideout  
A zwitterion is a molecule with an anion and cation!


Reminds me of This. Apparently zwitter means hermaphrodite

Speaking of Rammstein, benzene

ScienceSquirrel - 12-10-2011 at 07:50

Quote: Originally posted by fledarmus  
Don't forget putrescine and cadaverine, which smell just like you would expect them to smell.


And spermine which has a strong smell of fresh semen.

AndersHoveland - 13-10-2011 at 04:08

Here's one to win against all the others:

The relatively obscure Vestic acid (D-01988) has both a cis- and trans- form. The deoxy derivitive could plausibly be named "vestous" acid. Like any acid, the compound forms salts.

Yes, that is correct; sodium trans-vestite. :D


turd - 13-10-2011 at 13:17

Two days and nobody mentioned the SillyMols website? I am disappointed.

http://www.chm.bris.ac.uk/sillymolecules/sillymols.htm

Posted before on this forum:
https://www.sciencemadness.org/whisper/viewthread.php?tid=13...
https://www.sciencemadness.org/whisper/viewthread.php?tid=10...
https://www.sciencemadness.org/whisper/viewthread.php?tid=64...
https://www.sciencemadness.org/whisper/viewthread.php?tid=15...

Bot0nist - 13-10-2011 at 14:34

HA, Thebacon

That's hilarious.

ScienceHideout - 13-10-2011 at 17:30

Lol... Uranate :D Uranium Oxides

Adas - 23-11-2011 at 11:43

Here is another one: (2,2,6,6-Tetramethyl-piperidin-1-yl)oxyl = TEMPO :D
Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TEMPO

unionised - 23-11-2011 at 12:24

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arsole
is my favourite, but there's a whole bunch of them here
http://www.chm.bris.ac.uk/sillymolecules/sillymols.htm


[Edited on 23-11-11 by unionised]

Gary1234 - 23-11-2011 at 12:58

Here's one:

Sulphuretted hydrogen (an archaic name for hydrogen sulphide).

Gary1234 - 23-11-2011 at 13:01

Quote: Originally posted by Adas  
Here is another one: (2,2,6,6-Tetramethyl-piperidin-1-yl)oxyl = TEMPO :D
Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TEMPO


Is that a free radical initiator by the name of (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-yl)oxidanyl? (what a tongue twister! :P )

[Edited on 23-11-2011 by Gary1234]

Gary1234 - 23-11-2011 at 13:05

Theobromine, an alkaloid.

Its name is a bit of a misnomer, since it does not actually contain any Br atoms.

Gary1234 - 23-11-2011 at 13:10

How about :

DEAD (Diethyl azodicarboxylate).

Gary1234 - 23-11-2011 at 13:41

Very Fast Death Factor (Anatoxin A) :P

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lIavxAm4Mts&feature=relat...


009 - 24-11-2011 at 03:07

CuNT. Copper nitrotetrazolate :D

Lambda-Eyde - 18-6-2012 at 16:49

"Vomitoxin" :D

Ozone - 18-6-2012 at 20:14

"methylene chloride"

O3

mineralman - 19-6-2012 at 06:01

Quote: Originally posted by Lambda-Eyde  
My favourite is diethyl diazocarboxylate, which is known as "DEADCAT".


Is that anything to do with the guy who put a cat in a box with a time release of poison gas.?
He hypothasised that the cat was both dead & alive. not knowing when the gas would be released, he wouldn't know for sure if either was the actual fact at the time. (hope that made sense) MM

DJF90 - 19-6-2012 at 06:41

Is that supposed to be a Heisenberg joke?

mineralman - 19-6-2012 at 07:15

:D YES & NO, I was also curious as to the origin of the name.

MR AZIDE - 19-6-2012 at 11:03


I like Titanic Sulphate, Titanic Chloride etc........



Cummingtonite (Mg,Fe)7Si8O22(OH)2:D

Mannose......

I like Mercurous....i.e mercurous chloride,

linalool , ( linalo-ol...????)


mineralman - 19-6-2012 at 11:49

BOTRYOIDAL HEMIMORPHITE, When you get into minerals, theres some corkers out there. hope it counts MM

Rich_Insane - 19-6-2012 at 12:20

I always knew chemists had a sense of humor :D

MrTechGuy1995 - 20-6-2012 at 14:33

Phallic Acid <==> Phthalic Acid

I feel bad for people who have slurs.

thelonious - 20-6-2012 at 19:26

Quote: Originally posted by AndersHoveland  

And KClO4 is referred to as perchlorate, although it does not contain any oxygen-oxygen bonds.


I was taught that the per- is short for hyper- and indicates a higher oxidation state, although I could be wrong

woelen - 21-6-2012 at 00:10

The per-prefix comes from old times, when there was no knowledge on the structure of molecules and ions. People only knew the net formula.

They knew H2O and H2O2, hydrogen oxide and hydrogen peroxide.
They knew NaBO2 and NaBO3, sodium metaborate and sodium metaperborate.
They also knew BaO and BaO2, barium oxide and barium peroxide

The above are real peroxides. More examples are K2SO5, Na2S2O8.

There also are many compounds with very similar net formula, the difference being just a single oxygen atom, or having less of the other elements, relative to the oxygen.

Examples are KClO3 and KClO4, K2MnO4 and KMnO4. The more oxygen-rich compound received the per-prefix in its name. More oxygen-deficient chemicals received the -ite ending in its name, e.g. NaClO2, K2MnO3, Na2SO3.

Nowadays we know the essential difference between e.g. KClO4 and Na2SO5, but the old names survive and noone is willing to use the full IUPAC names for these components:
potassium tetraoxo chlorate(VII)
sodium monoperoxo trioxo sulfate(VI)

A compound like K3CrO8 has no common name from old times, because it was not known yet. In this case the IUPAC name is used:
potassium tetraperoxo chromate(V)

The full names can be simplified by leaving out all oxo-ligands and assuming these implicitly. The above names then become
potassium chlorate(VII)
sodium monoperoxo sulfate(VI)
potassium tetraperoxo chromate(V)
Only other ligands, other than oxygen are explicitly named. Common ligands can be fluoro, peroxo, chloro, cyano, hydroxo. E.g. Na2PFO3 is called sodium monofluorophosphate(V).

DoctorOfPhilosophy - 27-6-2012 at 23:30

Here's a big list
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_chemical_compounds_with...

Adas - 24-4-2013 at 05:49

Tropic amide :D

papaya - 24-4-2013 at 11:59

luciferin ?:mad:

mr.crow - 24-4-2013 at 12:33

I think this thread has been beaten into the ground

Antiswat - 25-4-2013 at 06:10

not really a chemical, but of the binary explosive of ammonium nitrate and aluminium shortened to ANAL you get obvious comments regarding this on every video.. (:

ParadoxChem126 - 25-6-2013 at 09:37

Churchane, basketane, bowtiediene...
Made me laugh :D

Adas - 13-3-2014 at 14:46

THEBACON rules them all :D

numos - 13-3-2014 at 20:50

Penguinone ^^






This has got to be the most adorable molecule in existence. :D

Pyro - 15-3-2014 at 18:42

Quote: Originally posted by mineralman  
Quote: Originally posted by Lambda-Eyde  
My favourite is diethyl diazocarboxylate, which is known as "DEADCAT".


Is that anything to do with the guy who put a cat in a box with a time release of poison gas.?
MM

You mean Erwin Schrodinger

thesmug - 15-3-2014 at 18:59

Quote: Originally posted by mineralman  
Quote: Originally posted by Lambda-Eyde  
My favourite is diethyl diazocarboxylate, which is known as "DEADCAT".


Is that anything to do with the guy who put a cat in a box with a time release of poison gas.?
He hypothasised that the cat was both dead & alive. not knowing when the gas would be released, he wouldn't know for sure if either was the actual fact at the time. (hope that made sense) MM

Nope, comes from Diethyl azodicarboxylate.

unionised - 16-3-2014 at 02:19

Does anyone know how you make Ethyl lactate?