Sciencemadness Discussion Board
Not logged in [Login ]
Go To Bottom

Printable Version  
Author: Subject: Chlorine
Pixicious
Harmless
*




Posts: 31
Registered: 28-1-2008
Member Is Offline

Mood: Smiley

[*] posted on 25-2-2008 at 17:55
Chlorine


Hi,

I had wondered since I found a bottle of Ammonium Chloride whether it could be broken down into the components that made it. NH3 + HCl. Would heating produce this?

I am aware Hydrogen Chloride can then relatively easily be broken down to it's components and NH3 can too be too with relative ease.

It's not an experiment I would do but it is one that interests me.

Pixie

[Edited on 26-2-2008 by Pixicious]
View user's profile View All Posts By User
chemkid
National Hazard
****




Posts: 269
Registered: 5-4-2007
Location: Suburban Hell
Member Is Offline

Mood: polarized

[*] posted on 25-2-2008 at 18:34


Hydrogen chloride can be broken down via. manganese dioxide (black powder in dry cell batteries). I would like to know about ammonia as well.

Chemkid




View user's profile View All Posts By User
Pixicious
Harmless
*




Posts: 31
Registered: 28-1-2008
Member Is Offline

Mood: Smiley

[*] posted on 25-2-2008 at 18:54


Would that be in a methanol solution or water?

NH4Cl + NaOH -> NH3(gas) + NaCl

An Iron/Copper catalyst at 450C will break NH3 into its components I believe.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
microcosmicus
National Hazard
****




Posts: 287
Registered: 31-12-2007
Member Is Offline

Mood: spin up

[*] posted on 25-2-2008 at 19:10


Sure, it will decompose upon heating (and recompose upon cooling). You can read
all you want to know about this and more in the following article:

C. C. Stephenson
The Dissociation of Ammonium Chloride
J. Chem. Phys. 12, 318 (1944);

In fact, an old preparation for ammonia was to heat NH4Cl and then use CaO to remove
the HCl. Historical trivia: Originally, NH4Cl was known as "sal ammoniac" because it
occurred naturally near the temple of Ammon, so the gas prepared from it became
known as ammonia.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/alabaster/A632990
View user's profile Visit user's homepage View All Posts By User
chemkid
National Hazard
****




Posts: 269
Registered: 5-4-2007
Location: Suburban Hell
Member Is Offline

Mood: polarized

[*] posted on 25-2-2008 at 19:14


I do love the olden names for compounds and their origins...blue vitrol, oil of vitrol, so on and so fourth



View user's profile View All Posts By User

  Go To Top