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itchyfruit
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[*] posted on 11-8-2009 at 15:08
Scientific calculators


I'm finally getting a scientific calculator and looking at the casio fx8 or fx9 they seem to be a good choice, but i would be interested to hear any other suggestions !!
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bfesser
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[*] posted on 11-8-2009 at 16:06


I'd recommend Texas Instruments over Casio.
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entropy51
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[*] posted on 11-8-2009 at 16:20


Quote: Originally posted by itchyfruit  
I'm finally getting a scientific calculator and looking at the casio fx8 or fx9 they seem to be a good choice, but i would be interested to hear any other suggestions !!


Frickin unbelieveable.:D
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crazyboy
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[*] posted on 11-8-2009 at 16:42


Are you a student? If so I suggest the TI-85 it's a graphing calculator and it may be more than what you need at the moment but if you ever take calculus or algebra II you will end up buying one anyway.



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itchyfruit
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[*] posted on 11-8-2009 at 16:44


I didn't see a Texas instruments one but i'll have another look. cheers

entropy51, All i have to do now is learn to use the sucker :D
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itchyfruit
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[*] posted on 11-8-2009 at 16:47


I suppose i'm a sort of student, i'm doing Bsc chemistry open university (don't laugh) :D
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DJF90
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[*] posted on 11-8-2009 at 23:06


I know in the UK A-level exams a calculator with the ability to differentiate or manipulate algebra is NOT allowed. I have an casio fx85 and it is more than adequate for my needs as a chemistry student on an MChem course. Please note that for the maths course we had to take we were not allowed to use ANY calculator at all, so knowing values of sin/cos/tan for common angles and being able to do binomial expansions and such was a necessity for us.

One piece of advice though: Get a solar powered one with battery - the fx85ES is the specific model I have, that way you dont have to worry about it not working when you most need it.
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gsd
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[*] posted on 12-8-2009 at 06:26



My suggestion is till you buy your Casio, you can use this one for free :)

http://jscicalc.sourceforge.net/

http://www.uyea.btinternet.co.uk/calculator.html

Use this link to try out before downloading the exe file.

gsd
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bfesser
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[*] posted on 12-8-2009 at 06:31


Yeah, don't buy one that's just solar. You can always carry around a few spare batteries. I had to take a midterm in a dark room once and of course the calculator I brought with was solely solar. And from then on, no calculators allowed, anyways!

The TI-83+ is pretty standard in the U.S.A. as far as graphing calculators go (includes all scientific functions, of course). I've found that it's more reliable than the 85. In fact, mine's survived being run over by a car, thrown against walls, dropped down flights of stairs, etc.

The TI-36X is nice for scientific use, but doesn't fare well in low light conditions. The TI-34II is simple, reliable, has a largish display, and is more intuitive than the higher level calculators, but lacks some of the advanced features.

On a side note, I doubt you'd consider these anyways, but avoid the v200 like the plague! Mine developed a faulty screen by just sitting unused in a drawer for a month or so. For advanced work (besides a computer), the TI-89 Titanium is nice.

Just don't forget, the best calculator you can possess is your own brain! Use it, don't abuse it. The less reliant you are on a calculator, the better you'll do in math & science courses.

[Edited on 8/12/09 by bfesser]
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jokull
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[*] posted on 12-8-2009 at 07:27


Hi.

I really agree with the previous reply from bfesser, concerning to the fact that your brain is the best calculator.

In my first 2 years at university (7 years ago) I owned a Casio fx-4500P (fabricated in 1989) which was quite powerful even for numerical methods problems thanks to its simple way of programming.

Later I got both a TI-89 and an HP-49G. From time to time I use these calculators, however I have always prefered the TI-89 since it runs faster and its plastic keys are easier to handle than those rubber keys of the HP-49G.

That is my personal experience concerning scientific calculators.

Finally, there are several emulators that you can run on your PC so you can evaluate which calculator would be your best choice.
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Lambda-Eyde
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[*] posted on 12-8-2009 at 08:04


If you have access to a laptop, I recommend TI InterActive. It's just a dream to use, with great capabilities and a nice, simple GUI.
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Picric-A
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[*] posted on 12-8-2009 at 12:34


Ive always used Casio and never had a problem with it... in my opinion they are superior
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itchyfruit
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[*] posted on 12-8-2009 at 15:14


Thanks guys!!
I've ordered both the casios, i thought i could see which one i get on with best use that, and keep the other as a spare.
The TI's looked a bit complicated!!
I'm not doing maths(allthough really i should because i really struggle with it) i just hope the ones i have ordered will be permitted in exams(good point DJF90)i think the fx85 should be ok!!
Now i have 2 calculator instruction manuals to read aswell as a massive pile of chemistry books :)
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DJF90
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[*] posted on 12-8-2009 at 15:28


The fx85 is very simple to use, even without reading the manual. I dont think I've ever bothered...
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itchyfruit
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[*] posted on 12-8-2009 at 15:55


You have probably used a scientific calculator before!I don't think i've even touched one :D
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entropy51
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[*] posted on 12-8-2009 at 16:40


Sandy the Witch can probably teach you how to use one.:P

My advice is not to spend a lot of money on your first one. I've owned or still own most of those mentioned, but my favorite is something called AtiTech that I bought at the drugstore 15 years ago for $10. It has all the scientific functions and is still working on its first battery.

You can spring for the fancy stuff later if and when you find you need it.

[Edited on 13-8-2009 by entropy51]
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itchyfruit
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[*] posted on 12-8-2009 at 17:06


she can't,she only has an abacus (made from sheeps eyes) ;)

the 2 i've ordered cost £16 for the pair so not to bad(some cost over £50)
I'll probably drop them in the sink anyway :D
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Cuauhtemoc
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[*] posted on 13-8-2009 at 09:02


I got a 50g from HP, it's kinda expensive but it's pretty complete. Too bad some professors don't let you use it in exams, as you can put text on it.Some doesn't care although, and well it's awesome.
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Magpie
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[*] posted on 13-8-2009 at 10:09


I have an HP11C and like it very much. I don't think they cost very much. I keep one in the house and one in the lab.



The single most important condition for a successful synthesis is good mixing - Nicodem
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itchyfruit
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[*] posted on 13-8-2009 at 10:27


Thats another thing i concidered is it ok to keep one in the lab(hcl fumes ect)
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Magpie
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[*] posted on 13-8-2009 at 11:56


I think in your situation I would take the advice of "buy the cheapest one available." You very likely don't need a gazillion functions and all kinds of programming capability. I only use a few trig functions, a recall function, roots, powers, etc. The simplest scientific calculators should cover those.

If you like reverse Polish notation buy an HP. If not buy a Casio or some such. Reverse polish is nice once you learn it, which comes quickly.

I've kept one of my calculators in my lab for years. But I value my lungs more than my calculator and have an efficient fume hood.




The single most important condition for a successful synthesis is good mixing - Nicodem
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