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Author: Subject: Hydrogen Peroxide Storage?
jgourlay
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[*] posted on 18-8-2009 at 03:50
Hydrogen Peroxide Storage?


Gents: what is the best method for long term (several year) storage of 35% H202?
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User
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[*] posted on 18-8-2009 at 05:34


Well as far as ive seen that would be cold and in absence of light (rather obvious i would say)
This is the way that they stored it where I studied.
I use the same idea at home, using a refrigerator ( 2 degrees ) and some aluminium foil, for wrapping the bottle in.

[Edited on 18-8-2009 by User]




What a fine day for chemistry this is.
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jgourlay
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[*] posted on 18-8-2009 at 07:03


Good. Confirms what I thought.

Any problems storing Peroxide, Sulfuric Acid, and Nitric Acid all in the same fridge?
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JohnWW
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[*] posted on 18-8-2009 at 07:11


As long as you do not store with it any organic substances that could mix with a spillage of concentrated H2O2, forming dangerously explosive organic peroxides, you should be OK. Mineral acids should be OK.
Do this search on Google: MSDS "hydrogen peroxide" .
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lopos123
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[*] posted on 18-8-2009 at 07:38


Is it ok to leave it in the freezer?
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[*] posted on 18-8-2009 at 08:48


Well it is possible to freeze out the water blaim that on the difference in freezing point.
This could effect the H2O2/H2O, alltough I am not sure that this would make any difference.

Don't store it next to your acetone :P:P

[Edited on 18-8-2009 by User]




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2-Propanon
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[*] posted on 18-8-2009 at 09:17


*First Post*

Hi,
storing it refrigerated wont be a problem if its freezing fast. Then water and Hydrogen-peroxide will not separate. If its freezing too slow instead, its separating with giving highly concentrated Hydrogen peroxide and ice. That might be a problem if you would like take it out of the fridge for instant use.

2-Propanon

BTW: Freezing out the water is a "slow" but efficient process to produce concentrated Hydrogen-peroxide. It could even be obtained from solutions around 1-3%, by just freezing it again and again, always removing the ice. I remember the highest conc. obtaineable is somewhat ~ 60%.
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gsd
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[*] posted on 18-8-2009 at 09:24


Quote: Originally posted by User  
Well it is possible to freeze out the water blaim that on the difference in freezing point.
This could effect the H2O2/H2O, alltough I am not sure that this would make any difference.



You can not "Salt-out" Hydrogen Peroxide from water by freezing.

The attached paper shows fp of 31.96 % H2O2 as -28.5 Deg. C whereas that of 27.72 % as -23.4 Deg. C.
So 30 % should be about -26 Deg. C.



Attachment: THE PROPERTIES OF PURE HYDROGEN PEROXIDE. II.pdf (123kB)
This file has been downloaded 1068 times
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Ozone
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[*] posted on 18-8-2009 at 11:40


1. Keep it cold, not frozen.
2. Keep it with a vented/rupture capable cap in case it builds pressure
3. Keep it away from light
4. Don't sample from the container. Pour into a separate container and sample from there. The number one cause of bunk H2O2 is contamination from sampling. Primarily, this goes three ways:
a. organic matter is introduced which reduces the peroxide and may produce organic peroxides
b. acids or bases change reactivity and/or greately lower the stability of the H2O2 (e.g. alkali), this can occur with c, below.
c. Perhaps the worst and easiest to do-The introduction of even catalytic amounts of certain metal species such as Fe, Mn, W, etc. These will, over time, quietly (or perhaps not) destroy the whole lot. I have observed and entire 55 gal drum of 35% go bad over several weeks because a metal pipe had been used to transfer some of the contents.

Hope that covers most of it,

O3

[Edited on 18-8-2009 by Ozone]




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jgourlay
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[*] posted on 18-8-2009 at 12:08


Ozone: thanks. So I'm thinking I need a dedicated pipette to transfer from the main bottle to the sampling bottle. And the pipette needs to be stored, for example, in a plastic baggie so it can't pick up anything.

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Barium
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[*] posted on 18-8-2009 at 17:10


It is much better practice to pour from the main bottle into the sampling bottle and then pipette the required amount. By this route nothing enters the main bottle.
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jgourlay
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[*] posted on 19-8-2009 at 10:48


Barium, do you know of any videos showing the right technique for that pouring? By "right technique" I mean the way to take a 1 gallon jug and pour off, say, a half a cup and NOT have a dribble of acid oozing down the outside of the container.

Thus far, with sulfuric acid, I've tried being super careful when pouring from the bottle, yet the pile of baking soda on which it sits always sizzles when I set the bottle back down.
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DJF90
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[*] posted on 19-8-2009 at 11:54


Wear gloves (of course) and pour the liquid down a glass stirring rod. This probably sounds dodgy but its rather very good, I'm sure it was mentioned here before and there was possibly even a picture or video attached.
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jgourlay
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[*] posted on 19-8-2009 at 12:13


Stirring rod sounds fine....except for a one gallon jug, which is a two handed operation for sure.
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Everado E. Dinavo
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[*] posted on 19-8-2009 at 13:54


I asked a professor what the "right" method was to pour things because I would always make a mess, and he pretty much just said "try harder." I found that if you tilt the jug fast enough, it will pour out into the cup/beaker/whatever instead of running down the side. When you're done, tilt it back quickly as well. If it's a really full container, then I use the pipet tip or glass rod method to guide the liquid down by surface tension. You might be able to do it with a jug if you leave the bottom on the counter, and hold the beaker/whatever in one hand and the jug and pipet in the other.
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DJF90
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[*] posted on 19-8-2009 at 18:32


You should be able to hold the neck of the jug and the glass rod in the same hand. The other hand can then go towards the bottom of the jug to facilitate pouring. Leave the beaker on the counter and be careful not to knock it over with the glass rod as you move the jug to pour/stop pouring. The more I think about this the harder it sounds... Is there not someone who can help pour it? Either that or you could maybe use a funnel :D
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Everado E. Dinavo
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[*] posted on 19-8-2009 at 21:28


The funnel doesn't help if the viscosity is too high. Ever noticed that a bottle of olive oil is ALWAYS greasy? Even if it has a pouring nozzle on it. Sulfuric acid also has a greasy consistency so it will pour down the side unless you pour it quickly. Also don't forget that if something is dangerous, you're guaranteed to spill it, as I've observed with bromine many times.
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