Sciencemadness Discussion Board
Not logged in [Login ]
Go To Bottom

Printable Version  
 Pages:  1  ..  3    5  
Author: Subject: Laboratory Tips and Tricks
zenosx
Hazard to Others
***




Posts: 188
Registered: 7-7-2012
Location: East TN / Near Oak Ridge
Member Is Offline

Mood: Awaiting Results....

[*] posted on 6-11-2012 at 18:39


I want to hear why sciencehideout found pipetting by mouth wasn't such a great idea....
View user's profile Visit user's homepage View All Posts By User
Mailinmypocket
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1351
Registered: 12-5-2011
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 7-11-2012 at 07:47


Quote: Originally posted by zenosx  
I want to hear why sciencehideout found pipetting by mouth wasn't such a great idea....


As far as I know, it isn't a good idea due to the fact that you can end up with chemicals in your mouth. He may have had a bad experience though- who knows!
View user's profile View All Posts By User
zenosx
Hazard to Others
***




Posts: 188
Registered: 7-7-2012
Location: East TN / Near Oak Ridge
Member Is Offline

Mood: Awaiting Results....

[*] posted on 8-11-2012 at 06:50


I want to hear why sciencehideout found pipetting by mouth wasn't such a great idea....
View user's profile Visit user's homepage View All Posts By User
zenosx
Hazard to Others
***




Posts: 188
Registered: 7-7-2012
Location: East TN / Near Oak Ridge
Member Is Offline

Mood: Awaiting Results....

[*] posted on 8-11-2012 at 07:24


Lol, that much is obvious. I imagine it wasn't a fun day to find out that "tip". Hopefully it wasn't anything too toxic or corrosive :)
View user's profile Visit user's homepage View All Posts By User
Oscilllator
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 659
Registered: 8-10-2012
Location: The aqueous layer
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 10-11-2012 at 00:59


I find a great alternative to those plastic transfer pipettes to be straws. Straws can be bought from any supermarket by the hundred, and at negligible cost. To use a straw as a transfer pipette simply place it in the liquid, put your thumb over the top and pull it out again! Liquid will remain in the straw until you take your thumb off the top.

I use this method all the time, especially when I want to test the PH of a solution.




View user's profile View All Posts By User
Mailinmypocket
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1351
Registered: 12-5-2011
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 19-11-2012 at 08:39
Stuck glass joints?


I downloaded a PDF from Sigma-Aldrich called "Safe Handling and Care of Glassware" It's by Corning and has some interesting bits. One tip that was new to me was their method of separating stuck ground glass joints using soda water.

I tried to copy/paste from the document but it won't allow it, it's on page 6....



Attachment: Glass care and safe handling.pdf (1.3MB)
This file has been downloaded 1107 times
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Dr.Bob
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 2507
Registered: 26-1-2011
Location: USA - NC
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 19-11-2012 at 09:02


Quote: Originally posted by Oscilllator  
I find a great alternative to those plastic transfer pipettes to be straws. Straws can be bought from any supermarket by the hundred, and at negligible cost. To use a straw as a transfer pipette simply place it in the liquid, put your thumb over the top and pull it out again! Liquid will remain in the straw until you take your thumb off the top.

I use this method all the time, especially when I want to test the PH of a solution.


I like to use a Pasteur pipette for removing enough to take a pH.

And the plastic transfer pipettes are not that expensive. I have cases of 500 available for $10 each, or a bagful for a $1.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
ScienceHideout
National Hazard
****




Posts: 391
Registered: 12-3-2011
Location: In the Source
Member Is Offline

Mood: High Spin

[*] posted on 23-11-2012 at 07:57


Quote: Originally posted by zenosx  
Lol, that much is obvious. I imagine it wasn't a fun day to find out that "tip". Hopefully it wasn't anything too toxic or corrosive :)


lol, no. It was just acetone- didn't taste very good, though, and it made parts of my mouth feel funny. I'd rather stick to water as a refreshing beverage. :)




hey, if you are reading this, I can't U2U, but you are always welcome to send me an email!


View user's profile Visit user's homepage View All Posts By User
Pyro
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1305
Registered: 6-4-2012
Location: Gent, Belgium
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 20-12-2012 at 14:31


A microwave. You can use it for anything.
a few examples are: drying substances, I dry my KBr, KMnO4, ... with it, just half fill a beaker and put in on a 60s cycle, when thats done you usually have a perfectly dry solid
preheating liquids, When i re distill water I put the boiling flask in the microwave until just before it boils, then I put it on a hot hotplate and attach it to my condenser, that saves a lot of time.
when I wash a glass bottle and need it fast, I microwave it.




all above information is intellectual property of Pyro. :D
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Magpie
lab constructor
*****




Posts: 5939
Registered: 1-11-2003
Location: USA
Member Is Offline

Mood: Chemistry: the subtle science.

[*] posted on 17-1-2013 at 15:00


Do you ever have a stuck ptfe stopcock? Just immerse it in ice-water. I have done this twice now and the stopcock frees in less than a minute. ;)

At first this seemed counter-intuitive. But a little reflection on the coefficients of thermal expansion for borosilicate glass and ptfe showed why it works so well.




The single most important condition for a successful synthesis is good mixing - Nicodem
View user's profile View All Posts By User
radagast
Hazard to Self
**




Posts: 79
Registered: 28-6-2012
Location: NYC
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 17-1-2013 at 16:48
Glassware Shelves


I was tired of my glassware rolling off of my plastic shelf. To solve that issue, I turned the shelf upside down, which provided a wealth of valleys and ridges to securely hold each piece of glassware.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
silvergrahm
Harmless
*




Posts: 36
Registered: 19-10-2012
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 17-1-2013 at 17:56


I'd like to know what types of makeshift stir rods folks are using here. And also what you use for 2L plus vessels, either reaction or general storage.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
CaliusOptimus
Hazard to Self
**




Posts: 96
Registered: 10-6-2011
Member Is Offline

Mood: Subjectively Objective

[*] posted on 17-1-2013 at 20:02


For the more technically inclined users, it's nice to have a few sticks of 1/4" round borosilicate rod around for making stir rods. You can heat the end up and flatten or shape it in any way, also you can make a rotating stirrer for high temp reactions where PTFE won't hold up.

Add a $50 oxy/propane torch and you can turn borosilicate tubing into tee fittings, capillaries, pipettes, reducers, and even weld small (~14/20) ground joints together to make adapters.

A great glass source: mountainglass.com
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Magpie
lab constructor
*****




Posts: 5939
Registered: 1-11-2003
Location: USA
Member Is Offline

Mood: Chemistry: the subtle science.

[*] posted on 17-1-2013 at 20:33


Quote: Originally posted by Magpie  
I often need a long stirring rod, something longer than the standard 10" variety, of which I have many. So I end up using my high temperature mercury thermometer as it is quite long. Realizing that this is poor practice I searched for a cheap source for a long stirring rod.

What I found is that you can order Simax borosilicate glass rod in several diameters from art glass suppliers for dirt cheap. You still have to pay the postage, however, which was about $5 for 3ea 20" rods.


I recommend FrantzArtglass.com

[Edited on 18-1-2013 by Magpie]




The single most important condition for a successful synthesis is good mixing - Nicodem
View user's profile View All Posts By User
CaliusOptimus
Hazard to Self
**




Posts: 96
Registered: 10-6-2011
Member Is Offline

Mood: Subjectively Objective

[*] posted on 17-1-2013 at 20:50


Quote: Originally posted by Magpie  


I recommend FrantzArtglass.com

[Edited on 18-1-2013 by Magpie]



Oooo...they are closer to me than mountainglass... I'm gonna place an order and see if the shipping is quicker :D
View user's profile View All Posts By User
White Yeti
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 816
Registered: 20-7-2011
Location: Asperger's spectrum
Member Is Offline

Mood: delocalized

[*] posted on 18-1-2013 at 09:15


I didn't see this on the page, but a convenient way to bend aluminium tubing is to make a coil from aluminium MIG wire around it before bending. The coil will prevent the tube from caving in while bending.

Once the tubing gets stiff, it's good to anneal it with the help of a strong heat source. I use a stovetop covered with aluminium foil which easily reaches annealing temperatures, even for copper. A bunsen burner or an ordinary fire would also work for aluminium, but aluminium melts at a low temperature, so you have to be careful.

The bending and annealing is repeatable, so virtually any shape is achievable. This will also work with copper tubing, but higher temperatures are needed for annealing and the coil will have to be made from a stronger and thicker piece of metal than MIG wire.

IMG_0930.JPG - 175kB




"Ja, Kalzium, das ist alles!" -Otto Loewi
View user's profile View All Posts By User
franklyn
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 3026
Registered: 30-5-2006
Location: Da Big Apple
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 18-1-2013 at 10:29


The way to bend metal tube is to fill it with something to keep it from collapsing ,
most commonly sand. Bending it hot will reduce the propensity for cold fracture.

.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Magpie
lab constructor
*****




Posts: 5939
Registered: 1-11-2003
Location: USA
Member Is Offline

Mood: Chemistry: the subtle science.

[*] posted on 29-3-2013 at 09:14


This posting nearly went to "Bad Days in the Lab" but instead turned out well. I dropped a mercury thermometer on the floor mercury end first when the cap came off its case. But instead of breaking and sending mercury all over the place, it merely bounced. This save was due to my son's gift of a rubber mat excessed from his place of work. It also saves my feet from standing on concrete when working in my lab. ;)

rubber pad.JPG - 148kB




The single most important condition for a successful synthesis is good mixing - Nicodem
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Hexavalent
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1564
Registered: 29-12-2011
Location: Wales, UK
Member Is Offline

Mood: Pericyclic

[*] posted on 29-3-2013 at 12:25


Very nice, Magpie! What kind of rubber is it composed of?

The carpet I have in my lab is not ideal for chemical, stain or fire resistance, but significantly reduces strain on my feet whilst standing and has also once saved my Hg thermometer.

What's the gas cylinder in the photo for....argon?




"Success is going from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm." Winston Churchill
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Pyro
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1305
Registered: 6-4-2012
Location: Gent, Belgium
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 29-3-2013 at 12:29


my carpet is best for fire and chem resistance. it's brick :)



all above information is intellectual property of Pyro. :D
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Hexavalent
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1564
Registered: 29-12-2011
Location: Wales, UK
Member Is Offline

Mood: Pericyclic

[*] posted on 29-3-2013 at 12:29


A trifle annoyed at my continuous misplacement of stirbars, I recently attached one of these magnetic trays:



to the bottom of my hood for easy access, which allows me to throw stirbars at it and have them stick. They are inexpensive to buy, and I always know where to find stirbars when I need them.




"Success is going from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm." Winston Churchill
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Hexavalent
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1564
Registered: 29-12-2011
Location: Wales, UK
Member Is Offline

Mood: Pericyclic

[*] posted on 29-3-2013 at 12:34


Since Easter is here, I have you a nice little tip: the trays that Easter eggs come on in shops/supermarkets are perfect for storing and holding RBFs of all sizes: I got about half a dozen different sizes the other day free of charge, and they are perfect for holding my 25 mL, 50 mL, 100 mL, 250 mL, 500 mL and 1L RBFs akin to the cork rings seen in professional labs.



"Success is going from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm." Winston Churchill
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Magpie
lab constructor
*****




Posts: 5939
Registered: 1-11-2003
Location: USA
Member Is Offline

Mood: Chemistry: the subtle science.

[*] posted on 29-3-2013 at 12:34


Quote: Originally posted by Hexavalent  
Very nice, Magpie! What kind of rubber is it composed of?

What's the gas cylinder in the photo for....argon?


I don't know - just some medium soft black rubber. It was to be sold for exercise equipment but came with a small rip - so my son got it for nothing.

Yes, the cylinder contains argon. I can get that filled for ~$20.




The single most important condition for a successful synthesis is good mixing - Nicodem
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Imakethings
Harmless
*




Posts: 13
Registered: 26-3-2013
Location: Boone, NC
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 30-3-2013 at 06:59


'Redneck' chemistry trick.

Use fine or ultra fine sand in place of oil immersion bath, other bonus is that it holds heat better and won't really react much if you spill something on it. One of my favorite tricks that.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Hexavalent
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1564
Registered: 29-12-2011
Location: Wales, UK
Member Is Offline

Mood: Pericyclic

[*] posted on 30-3-2013 at 08:35


Not to rain on your party, but various heating media have been discussed several times on the forum: a vast majority of members are quite aware of sand baths, and ironically a large proportion of people despise them :P.



"Success is going from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm." Winston Churchill
View user's profile View All Posts By User
 Pages:  1  ..  3    5  

  Go To Top