Sciencemadness Discussion Board
Not logged in [Login ]
Go To Bottom

Printable Version  
Author: Subject: Making videos for YouTube. Suggestions?
reactofurnace
Hazard to Self
**




Posts: 76
Registered: 17-7-2015
Member Is Offline

Mood: Volatile

[*] posted on 14-6-2019 at 17:44
Making videos for YouTube. Suggestions?


Guys I'm making some chemistry videos this summer before i go uni.
(It can be syntheses(organic or inorganic), Tutorials on a chem topic, or talking about science related topic with gameplay, to name a few)
Any suggestions Or topics y'all want to see?

BTW i can't do anything with explosives or super toxic like cyanide because of youtube's regulations




My channel name is EnTroPy: https://www.youtube.com/user/INVENTOR9991



my older videos are pretty bad quality :v
View user's profile Visit user's homepage View All Posts By User
lordcookies24
Hazard to Self
**




Posts: 78
Registered: 2-1-2019
Location: pluto
Member Is Offline

Mood: curious

[*] posted on 14-6-2019 at 18:35


it's fine to put music instead of talking, but at least try to add a caption to say what you are doing
View user's profile View All Posts By User
karlosĀ³
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1520
Registered: 10-1-2011
Location: yes!
Member Is Offline

Mood: oxazolidinic 8)

[*] posted on 15-6-2019 at 01:37


Just go on bitchute instead.
Chemistry youtubers are often gone too quick.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
j_sum1
Administrator
********




Posts: 5846
Registered: 4-10-2014
Location: Unmoved
Member Is Offline

Mood: Possessor of a tidy and organised lab. Now to mess it up again.

[*] posted on 15-6-2019 at 04:42


I am not sure why you are asking us.
Do what you love. Do what you are good at. Do something that you feel presents something a bit different that others will want to watch.
Then share here. People will watch it.

In terms of quality...
It needs to be good chemistry content.
It is better if it is well filmed -- filling in the frame. Good lighting. High quality cameras are secondary, although clear focus is preferred.
Well edited. Avoid long tedious procedural sections. You can spend time zoomed in on the action of any reactions though.
It does need to be meaningful. To do this you have to explain what is going on -- either through text, voiceover or narrative as you do it. If it is voiceover then it is better scripted. A tight script without too much waffle holds the attention better.
Timing. Much over 15-20 minutes and you will lose viewership -- unless it is really good.
Music is ok. It can be distracting though. Be careful with your sound levels if you are mixing narrative, music and lab sounds. Maximum of two of these at any given time.

If you want a following...
Youtube rewards regularity. Anything less frequent than once a week and your viewing rate will be slow.
Youtube rewards clickbait. Unfortunate.
Youtube rewards those who offer to play ads. You get more viewers if you monetise.
Careful selection / creation of a thumbnail and title makes a big difference to both viewing and promotion by YT.
High quality content will eventually win over poor quality content.




View user's profile View All Posts By User
j_sum1
Administrator
********




Posts: 5846
Registered: 4-10-2014
Location: Unmoved
Member Is Offline

Mood: Possessor of a tidy and organised lab. Now to mess it up again.

[*] posted on 15-6-2019 at 05:59


Quote: Originally posted by NotAUser  
No dun put music. Seriously. Not everything need music. Experiment sounds eg stirbar mixing sound is better than music.

I take it you have not watched any chemplayer then.
https://www.bitchute.com/channel/chemplayer/




View user's profile View All Posts By User
XeonTheMGPony
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1609
Registered: 5-1-2016
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 15-6-2019 at 09:02


Quote: Originally posted by karlosĀ³  
Just go on bitchute instead.
Chemistry youtubers are often gone too quick.


This, youtube is becoming more and more garbage and censorious.

Music is garbage on chem vids, it is obnoxious head ache inducing noise that makes it near impossible to understand what's going on!

Thank reality, and engineers, and soft ware makers for the mute function!



[Edited on 15-6-2019 by XeonTheMGPony]
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Abromination
National Hazard
****




Posts: 432
Registered: 10-7-2018
Location: Alaska
Member Is Offline

Mood: 1,4 tar

[*] posted on 15-6-2019 at 12:01


Havent you been posting chemistry videos for 5 years?
I see this as a channel reboot for you I suppose. You have nearly 1k subscribers, why do you feel it necessary to ask?




List of materials made by ScienceMadness.org users:
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1nmJ8uq-h4IkXPxD5svnT...
--------------------------------
Elements Collected: H, Li, B, C, N, O, Mg, Al, Si, P, S, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ag, I, Au, Pb, Bi, Am
Last Acquired: B
Next: Na
--------------
View user's profile View All Posts By User
draculic acid69
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1337
Registered: 2-8-2018
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 15-6-2019 at 22:20


Depends on the music
View user's profile View All Posts By User
maldi-tof
Harmless
*




Posts: 28
Registered: 3-4-2019
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 16-6-2019 at 13:28


Formation of complex are very colourful, it may like some future chemists.
If you mix those with Tanabe - Sugano diagrams, you will scare them!
View user's profile View All Posts By User
nimgoldman
National Hazard
****




Posts: 296
Registered: 11-6-2018
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 16-6-2019 at 22:20


Destruction of laboratory chemicals, waste processing and disposal is something I am missing in most chemistry channels.

Nile Red started doing it recently so maybe you can pick up some inspiration there.

Some examples:

processing metal waste - copper, nickel, silver, mercury etc.
destroying organics - permanganate/bleach oxidation, pyrolysis
purification techniques for various chemicals, mostly common technical grade chemicals to reagent grade (e.g. drian cleaner to pure sulfuric acid, extraction of various solvents from paint thinners etc.)
post-processing of various reaction mixtures
reductions in organic chemistry (using metals, hydrides, ascorbic acid etc.)
solvent destruction and/or recovery
properly cleaning glassware, dealing with water/alcohol washings
removal of stubborn residues (e.g. using alcoholic KOH or Piranha)
setting up scrubbers/filters for a fume hood
maintentance of a fume hood, vacuum pump and other equipment
View user's profile View All Posts By User
chemplayer...
Hazard to Others
***




Posts: 191
Registered: 25-4-2016
Location: Away from the secret island
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 22-6-2019 at 02:56


Jazz interludes. That's the secret ingredient!



Watch some vintage ChemPlayer: https://www.bitchute.com/channel/chemplayer/
View user's profile View All Posts By User
nimgoldman
National Hazard
****




Posts: 296
Registered: 11-6-2018
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 22-6-2019 at 14:59


Chemplayer I love clinking of glass and the sound of pouring liquids, but sometimes the background sounds are annoying (air vent, rikshas or sth. etc)

But overall most of the videos are gems. All in all, the video must have interesting content in the first place.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
reactofurnace
Hazard to Self
**




Posts: 76
Registered: 17-7-2015
Member Is Offline

Mood: Volatile

[*] posted on 22-6-2019 at 19:05


So truee :D

Quote: Originally posted by chemplayer...  
Jazz interludes. That's the secret ingredient!
View user's profile Visit user's homepage View All Posts By User
reactofurnace
Hazard to Self
**




Posts: 76
Registered: 17-7-2015
Member Is Offline

Mood: Volatile

[*] posted on 22-6-2019 at 19:08


Thank you!! Good Idea

Quote: Originally posted by nimgoldman  
Destruction of laboratory chemicals, waste processing and disposal is something I am missing in most chemistry channels.

Nile Red started doing it recently so maybe you can pick up some inspiration there.

Some examples:

processing metal waste - copper, nickel, silver, mercury etc.
destroying organics - permanganate/bleach oxidation, pyrolysis
purification techniques for various chemicals, mostly common technical grade chemicals to reagent grade (e.g. drian cleaner to pure sulfuric acid, extraction of various solvents from paint thinners etc.)
post-processing of various reaction mixtures
reductions in organic chemistry (using metals, hydrides, ascorbic acid etc.)
solvent destruction and/or recovery
properly cleaning glassware, dealing with water/alcohol washings
removal of stubborn residues (e.g. using alcoholic KOH or Piranha)
setting up scrubbers/filters for a fume hood
maintentance of a fume hood, vacuum pump and other equipment
View user's profile Visit user's homepage View All Posts By User
Carbon8
Harmless
*




Posts: 34
Registered: 1-1-2018
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 23-6-2019 at 14:51


Archive.org has hundreds of books full of chemistry experiments.

https://archive.org/search.php?query=chemistry%20experiments
https://archive.org/search.php?query=chemistry%20laboratory
View user's profile View All Posts By User
AJKOER
Radically Dubious
*****




Posts: 3016
Registered: 7-5-2011
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 24-6-2019 at 04:42


First, in the event you make a mistake, that is now on the public record, create a user name not revealing your identity and avoid facial pictures of yourself.

Second, I would suggest that the overall tone/content of your first video be very conservative, as you are, in fact, still in a pre-university acceptance position. As such, avoid any off color humor or comments, no matter how brief, which may come back to bar you from admissions. In that light, in your first video, which could be cited in future works, reference local ordinances, state laws, etc., relating to setting up a legal lab. Access and affordability of chemicals for the amateur chemist is also on topic. Remember to properly label any chemicals in a container, which is one of my local laws, which provides an immediate arrest opportunity for police to apprehend suspected drug cooks.

Also, most video have warning statements on toxic and dangerous procedures, which is a legal must, to which I would add, persons untrained and schooled in the art should be supervised by a qualified person to reduce the likelihood of lab accidents. I would have this in print at the beginning of the video and repeated in print and words at the end, or a blanket statement, do not try this experiment yourself due to the risk of personal injury or death.

If you're not able to legally set up a lab, then perform the video in the kitchen with conventional household items and/or chemicals, including, for example, a microwave. In this regard, you may find some of my recent threads may be appropriate for further exploration.

Good Luck

[Edited on 24-6-2019 by AJKOER]
View user's profile View All Posts By User

  Go To Top