Sciencemadness Discussion Board
Not logged in [Login ]
Go To Bottom

Printable Version  
Author: Subject: Should 99.99% mercury contain slag? [Update from seller]
Rutherford
Harmless
*




Posts: 8
Registered: 7-10-2019
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 18-10-2019 at 13:42
Should 99.99% mercury contain slag? [Update from seller]


I recently purchased mercury for demonstration purposes. The mercury was purchased from Onyxmet and it states it is 99.99% pure. What would be this slag floating around? Is this normal?

I'm just wondering if I should contact them... because it certainly isn't as clean as I thought it would be.

My first theory was that it would be iron oxide, considering the mercury probably came from an iron flask but it isn't magnetic.

DS7_9196-2.jpg - 5.3MB

DS7_9194-2.jpg - 7.2MB

[Edited on 19-10-2019 by Rutherford]
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Ubya
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1151
Registered: 23-11-2017
Location: Rome-Italy
Member Is Offline

Mood: I'm a maddo scientisto!!!

[*] posted on 18-10-2019 at 13:48


If I remember correctly not all iron oxides are magnetic, so probably it is just rust




---------------------------------------------------------------------
feel free to correct my grammar, or any mistakes i make

If you are looking for chemicals check this out: [For Sale]300 chemicals (rare & unusual)
---------------------------------------------------------------------
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Rutherford
Harmless
*




Posts: 8
Registered: 7-10-2019
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 18-10-2019 at 13:54


Do you think this would merit a chat with the vendor?
View user's profile View All Posts By User
morganbw
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 561
Registered: 23-11-2014
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 18-10-2019 at 15:12


I think a chat would be in order.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
DavidJR
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 908
Registered: 1-1-2018
Location: Scotland
Member Is Offline

Mood: Tired

[*] posted on 18-10-2019 at 16:18


If it's just that small amount of insoluble crud then that could quite easily still meet the 99.99% spec considering how dense mercury is... Of course, there could be dissolved metals too, but i'm not sure i'd worry about that just because of some insoluble crap floating on top.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Boffis
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1642
Registered: 1-5-2011
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 19-10-2019 at 01:16


Even the purest mercury oxidizes slowly and more importantly absorbs sulphur from the atmosphere. Sulphur generally cretes a black scum the browner colours are generally the oxide. Traditionally mercury has to be cleaned periodically by dripping into dilute 10% nitric acid. The aqueosu phase is easily separated from the clean mercury which is then washed with water remove the remaining nitric acid. Don't through the washings down the drain! Kept them for next time.

This procedure should give you nice shiny mercury.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Rutherford
Harmless
*




Posts: 8
Registered: 7-10-2019
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 19-10-2019 at 03:36


Quote: Originally posted by Boffis  
Even the purest mercury oxidizes slowly and more importantly absorbs sulphur from the atmosphere. Sulphur generally cretes a black scum the browner colours are generally the oxide. Traditionally mercury has to be cleaned periodically by dripping into dilute 10% nitric acid. The aqueosu phase is easily separated from the clean mercury which is then washed with water remove the remaining nitric acid. Don't through the washings down the drain! Kept them for next time.

This procedure should give you nice shiny mercury.


I think I will try that, would you recommend I first past it through a plunger? Or will the nitric acid take care of this brown oxide?
View user's profile View All Posts By User
G-Coupled
National Hazard
****




Posts: 287
Registered: 9-3-2017
Member Is Offline

Mood: Slightly triturated

[*] posted on 19-10-2019 at 03:54


If you feel brave, and wish to try distilling your Mercury to purify it, both NileRed and Cody's Lab have pretty good videos on YouTube on how they did it.

NileRed

Cody's Lab

[Edited on 19-10-2019 by G-Coupled]




View user's profile View All Posts By User
Rutherford
Harmless
*




Posts: 8
Registered: 7-10-2019
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 19-10-2019 at 04:37


Quote: Originally posted by G-Coupled  
If you feel brave, and wish to try distilling your Mercury to purify it, both NileRed and Cody's Lab have pretty good videos on YouTube on how they did it.

NileRed

Cody's Lab

[Edited on 19-10-2019 by G-Coupled]


I don't have the necessary safety equipment to perform a mercury distillation. Awesome videos though, I love both of those channels.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
draculic acid69
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1256
Registered: 2-8-2018
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 19-10-2019 at 05:01


Looks more like copper than rust.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
UC235
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 541
Registered: 28-12-2014
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 19-10-2019 at 06:29


You can just let it drip through a pinhole in a folded filter paper. The oxides stick to the paper and the mercury comes out shiny. I have some mercury and it has all eventually gotten cruddy looking despite good storage.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Ubya
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1151
Registered: 23-11-2017
Location: Rome-Italy
Member Is Offline

Mood: I'm a maddo scientisto!!!

[*] posted on 19-10-2019 at 06:57


Quote: Originally posted by draculic acid69  
Looks more like copper than rust.


copper forms an amalgam with mercury, so i doubt that it would flow on it and do nothing





---------------------------------------------------------------------
feel free to correct my grammar, or any mistakes i make

If you are looking for chemicals check this out: [For Sale]300 chemicals (rare & unusual)
---------------------------------------------------------------------
View user's profile View All Posts By User
fusso
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1905
Registered: 23-6-2017
Location: 4 ∥ universes ahead of you
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 19-10-2019 at 07:06


Those red stuff looks like rust more than Cu or HgO to me.



View user's profile View All Posts By User
Rutherford
Harmless
*




Posts: 8
Registered: 7-10-2019
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 19-10-2019 at 09:59


He sent me this. On the one hand I feel bad for him, but then again it costed like 150€. What do you guys think would be a fair amount? Or just clean it with a syringe and move on?



[Edited on 19-10-2019 by Rutherford]
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Ubya
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1151
Registered: 23-11-2017
Location: Rome-Italy
Member Is Offline

Mood: I'm a maddo scientisto!!!

[*] posted on 19-10-2019 at 10:28


if it is just that stuff on the surface you can filter it through a syringe with a cotton plug at the bottom, you won't loose much Hg




---------------------------------------------------------------------
feel free to correct my grammar, or any mistakes i make

If you are looking for chemicals check this out: [For Sale]300 chemicals (rare & unusual)
---------------------------------------------------------------------
View user's profile View All Posts By User
fusso
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1905
Registered: 23-6-2017
Location: 4 ∥ universes ahead of you
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 19-10-2019 at 11:08


Quote: Originally posted by Boffis  
Traditionally mercury has to be cleaned periodically by dripping into dilute 10% nitric acid.
HNO3 will also dissolve Hg. Why isn't HCl better?

[Edited on 191019 by fusso]




View user's profile View All Posts By User
S.C. Wack
bibliomaster
*****




Posts: 2345
Registered: 7-5-2004
Location: Cornworld, Central USA
Member Is Offline

Mood: Enhanced

[*] posted on 19-10-2019 at 11:51


Because HCl isn't an oxidizer or a better solvent. In the sphygmomanometer thread I gave a method that works well. Shake violently for 2 min. w/ conc. KMnO4, wash, shake again for 2 min. w/ cold dil. HNO3, wash, dry w/ something lint-free. No mercury is dissolved even though it's in a very finely divided state.



"You're going to be all right, kid...Everything's under control." Yossarian, to Snowden
View user's profile Visit user's homepage View All Posts By User
G-Coupled
National Hazard
****




Posts: 287
Registered: 9-3-2017
Member Is Offline

Mood: Slightly triturated

[*] posted on 19-10-2019 at 12:36


Quote: Originally posted by Rutherford  
He sent me this. On the one hand I feel bad for him, but then again it costed like 150€. What do you guys think would be a fair amount? Or just clean it with a syringe and move on?

Ehh, if it's a really small percentage of the total amount you were sold, and you think you might be dealing with them in the future, it might be best to just let him know and to eat the (hopefully small) cost. Might buy some goodwill for the future, maybe?
View user's profile View All Posts By User
karlos³
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1383
Registered: 10-1-2011
Location: yes!
Member Is Offline

Mood: aminoketonologisch 8)

[*] posted on 19-10-2019 at 13:23


Try to clean it up first, a small amount of course, and only then complain.
Tom is a very good guy and most helpful, he will surely replace it if your cleanup fails.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
draculic acid69
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1256
Registered: 2-8-2018
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 19-10-2019 at 15:19


Quote: Originally posted by Ubya  
if it is just that stuff on the surface you can filter it through a syringe with a cotton plug at the bottom, you won't loose much Hg


Sounds like the best thing to do.then try the paper with a pinhole method.if that doesn't work I'd be asking for a replacement.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Rutherford
Harmless
*




Posts: 8
Registered: 7-10-2019
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 19-10-2019 at 15:41


Quote: Originally posted by karlos³  
Try to clean it up first, a small amount of course, and only then complain.
Tom is a very good guy and most helpful, he will surely replace it if your cleanup fails.


Yeah he is great. He ended up offering me some more mercury at a reduced rate, which I think I'm going to take.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
j_sum1
Administrator
********




Posts: 5540
Registered: 4-10-2014
Location: Oz
Member Is Offline

Mood: Taking opportunities to breathe.

[*] posted on 19-10-2019 at 17:07


Sounds like a good option all round.
You get experience with handling and cleaning Hg, which is a good thing.
You get a reasonable quantity of Hg at a good price.
Tom gets an additional sale and a happy customer.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Boffis
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1642
Registered: 1-5-2011
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 21-10-2019 at 09:26


10% nitric acid attacks mercury rather slowly, the oxide dissolves almost instantly. By the time the mercury drops have coalesced its time to pour off the acid and wash with a small amount of water several times. I collect the water washings separately let them evaporate down to a small volume spontaneously and then store them until I have enough to be worth reprocessing.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
diddi
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 723
Registered: 23-9-2014
Location: Victoria, Australia
Member Is Offline

Mood: Fluorescent

[*] posted on 21-10-2019 at 13:12


all my purchases from tom have been good. just saying.
Hg is easy to clean. i shake in HCl, then KMnO4, then water rinse and a dilute HNO3. then us a sep funnel to run it off. HCl is good for removing stuff like Zn that can be amalgamated.
sometimes I receive old portions of Hg from people so anything is possible in terms of contaminants. if i get any from possible Au prospectors i have to distill, but i usually do a batch rather than messing around setting up for small amounts.




Beginning construction of periodic table display
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Bezaleel
National Hazard
****




Posts: 415
Registered: 28-2-2009
Member Is Offline

Mood: transitional

[*] posted on 22-10-2019 at 06:11


Quote: Originally posted by Boffis  
(...)
I collect the water washings separately let them evaporate down to a small volume spontaneously and then store them until I have enough to be worth reprocessing.

So the mercury stays in solution? Or does it just evaporate slower?
View user's profile View All Posts By User

  Go To Top