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Author: Subject: One of the easiest scents to produce
Yttrium2
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[*] posted on 29-11-2019 at 09:38
One of the easiest scents to produce


I had it in my mind a while ago, but now I'm forgetting what it's called. It started with an I, if I remember correctly, and could be made from glycerin and iodine, if I remember correctly.


If I remember correctly it had a violet smell,


Is it ionone? I can't find a link describing the synthesis utilizing glycerin, and or iodine.



Any help would be appreciated.
It seemed to be a very easy to produce scent
[Edited on 11/29/2019 by Yttrium2]

[Edited on 11/29/2019 by Yttrium2]
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Ubya
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[*] posted on 29-11-2019 at 10:03


define scent, to me acetone has a nice scent, you don't even jave to make it, you can buy gallons of it. anyway i don't know any nice smelling compounds made from iodine and glycerine




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Yttrium2
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[*] posted on 29-11-2019 at 10:09


Keywords that I think I remember iodine, glycerin thought the compounds common name started with an I

It was nice smelling and easy to make-


Thinking there's too many I think I remembers to find it, after searching for a while nothing came up, not sure if anyone can find it.

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TheMrbunGee
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[*] posted on 29-11-2019 at 10:17


Maybe You remember something from procedure of making it, assuming You have seen it..?



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Pumukli
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[*] posted on 29-11-2019 at 11:38


I seem to remember, that beta-ionon smells nice, lilly of the valey scent, but I have not find an easy synthesis of this compound yet.
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Yttrium2
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[*] posted on 29-11-2019 at 13:14


Bingo! After hours of searching keywords I've got it.


Not iodine and glycerin :l

but sodium carbonate and castor oil

Here is the article


https://www.thoughtco.com/odor-of-violets-chemistry-demonstr...


Amy comments on this synthesis appreciated!

[Edited on 11/29/2019 by Yttrium2]
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unionised
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[*] posted on 29-11-2019 at 16:37


It's far from clear how that would work.
Does anyone have the wherewithal to check it?
Quote: Originally posted by Pumukli  
I seem to remember, that beta-ionon smells nice, lilly of the valey scent, but I have not find an easy synthesis of this compound yet.

Lilly of teh valley is typically thought of as smelling of linalool
Ionone is usually associated with violets (and also straw/ hay, where it's formed by degradation of carotenoids .

[Edited on 30-11-19 by unionised]
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Pumukli
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[*] posted on 29-11-2019 at 21:18


Yes, you are right, I thought of violets, but sometimes I get confused with the English names of flowers. Convallaria is unambigous though! :)

Edit: Castor oil is a versatile reagent for a home chemist for sure. Magpie turned it into 2-octanol. You can dismutate it into sebacic acid. Maybe heptanal too. Now this ionon-mixture... I was wise enough to impress my lady with a big jug of this compound a few months ago. Girls not really appreciate its versatility as a chemical feedstock, but love how their hair feels after a treatment of this oil! :)

[Edited on 30-11-2019 by Pumukli]

Edit2: I tried heating together 2.2 g Na2CO3 and 0.8g castor oil. First mixed with a glass rod, in a 50 ml Erlenmeyer, then cautiously heated over free flame (gas stove). It turned brown eventually, smoked a bit (was it vapour?) and smelled like burnt soap - but not like violets at all. Next time I use less oil, just really three drops. :)

[Edited on 30-11-2019 by Pumukli]
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Boffis
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[*] posted on 30-11-2019 at 08:10


Castor oil is a "fixed" or fatty oil, that is its a mixture of glycerol esters but in the description linked above the writer speaks about base catalysed aldol reaction between citral and acetone. Where do these come from in caster oil? If she said lemon grass oil which is rich in citral I could understand it.

Or am I missing something?
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stoichiometric_steve
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[*] posted on 1-12-2019 at 02:30


"In a dry test tube or small beaker, add a scoop of sodium carbonate and 3 drops of castor oil."

"this is a fairly complicated reaction, in which citral and acetone with calcium oxide catalyze an aldol condensation followed by a rearrangement reaction."

Magical indeed how out of thin air, citral, acetone and calcium oxide appear in a test tube filled with sodium carbonate and castor oil :D
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mayko
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[*] posted on 1-12-2019 at 21:26


I tried this with both sodium and calcium carbonate. The smell was pretty much what you'd expect from hot castor oil - very similar to hot corn oil.



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Pumukli
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[*] posted on 2-12-2019 at 05:31


Meanwhile I checked J. Chem. Edu. and found an article from long ago where they used NaOH to test for the presence of castor oil in cosmetics. The author said that 10% and above castor oil content could be detected by this method. Other oils/waxes/whatnot does not interfere. The detection is based on the reaction castor oil -> methyl-hexyl-ketone (2-octanone), because this ketone has a characteristic odour. The smell is probably not violets but something obtrusive and chemical-like though. :)
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[*] posted on 2-12-2019 at 12:58


Ahh... that sounds more plausible! So the bit about citral and acetone is just irrelevant bollocks then. OK problems solved
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