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Author: Subject: Disposal of copper acetate
TriiodideFrog
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[*] posted on 8-1-2021 at 03:19
Disposal of copper acetate


Is there a proper guideline to dispose of copper acetate? Any ideas help.
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outer_limits
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[*] posted on 8-1-2021 at 03:59


How much of it do you have? You could at least try to get copper back by electrolysis or chemically
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Fluorite
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[*] posted on 8-1-2021 at 04:26


add sulfuric acid and distill acetic acid like nurdrage did with copper nitrate
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itsallgoodjames
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[*] posted on 8-1-2021 at 05:36


For copper (and most transition metals), I precipitate them out as their hydroxides, then store that. Plus you can use the copper hydroxide for making other copper salts.



Nuclear physics is neat. It's a shame it's so regulated...

Now that I think about it, that's probably a good thing. Still annoying though.
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TriiodideFrog
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[*] posted on 8-1-2021 at 21:41


Ok thanks!
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Sulaiman
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[*] posted on 9-1-2021 at 01:36


eventually you will need to dispose of copper (and other metal) salts,
heavier metals should not enter any aquifer,
so need to go to landfill,
preferably as (almost) insoluble compounds such as sulphides.

minimise pollution but do not go to extremes as your small bit of polution is totally insignificant compared to other sources.
(e.g. copper is used in swimming pools as an algicide, pools have water changes)




CAUTION : Hobby Chemist, not Professional or even Amateur
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macckone
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[*] posted on 9-1-2021 at 15:18


copper is valuable enough to plate out or otherwise recover.

If you have metal salts the usual way to dispose of them is to render them insoluble.
For copper that would be converting to hydroxide by addition of sodium hydroxide.
You could also do the basic carbonate with sodium carbonate or bicarbonate.
Both will convert to the oxide on strong heating.
Copper oxide is practically insoluble, but it will dissolve in acids.
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