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aab18011
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smile.gif posted on 30-3-2021 at 23:30
The Sciencemadness Index


Was trying to find great solubility data for various chemicals... but have had a hard time, even with university resources. Luckily Merck and others have provided quite a lot.

But I had a thought, stemming from the thought of the Merck compendium of awesomeness, and that is, what if we "published" our own Sciencemadness Index? I mean the wiki is awesome, but who doesn't love a good book? Now, I don't know if anyone else would want one, but I'd love to make myself one.

If anyone has any personally discovered data and would be willing to share, I would like to put together a whole book with all of the relevant info I can find. It may take quite some time, but I don't mind the money and the time. And I would duly add citations for each person and the info they gave. For example, if you gave me solubility and melting point data for some unique and less-known/studied compound, you will have your information (what you choose) included and listed. Admittedly, this is a child-like envisioning of mine, but it would be cool to see some of the sciencemadness veterans with their data represented in a book rather than scattered around the forum. I'd like to think that we'd all appreciate a nice neatly organized list of data rather than opening 100 tabs. I digress.

At the moment, I'm going for a sort of new Merck, since even sigma, alfa, and other companies don't always have data, and neither do all of the MSDS files. But as it grows and gets updated with university info and community info (from one's own experimenting), I can see how this could be useful for an amateur.

Eh, anyway. Hope you all are surviving well in this world of craziness.




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H He Li B C(12,14) Na S Cl Mn Fe Cu Zn Ba Ag Sn I U(238)
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Antigua
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[*] posted on 30-3-2021 at 23:46


Indexes like this already exist... chemiru, PubChem and ChemSpider all list solubilities in different solvents.
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Texium
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[*] posted on 31-3-2021 at 06:20


If you want to publish new data rather than just compiling existing stuff, there’s going to need to be strict guidelines for verifying the data that is collected. I would not take someone’s word for a melting point of something they made in a home lab without any other analytical data to back it up. Who knows if it was still wet or impure. Same goes for solubility. Before determining that, it needs to be verified that the compound is pure. For organic compounds I would say NMR and HPLC or GC, minimum. Not everyone has access to those, but some people here do and may be willing to test samples. Then the melting point and solubility could be determined but we would need to have a universal protocol that would be followed on how to go about gathering that data.

An effort that that cuts any corners would be worthless.




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They're not really active right now, but here's my YouTube channel and my blog.
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[*] posted on 31-3-2021 at 11:38


@Antigua, they do, but they are missing hundreds of entries on compounds. I already have compiled a huge list of solubilities from my univ database, and that is only for roughly 120 compounds. That's a lot of compounds that aren't on PubChem or ChemSpider. Both are really great, but I wanted something for quick reference that didn't have any unnecessary information. Not for nothing, but something like 2,6-diiodophenol has almost zero references on solubility data, and most are extrapolated from existing 2,6-dichloro and 2,6-dibromo homologues. Also, solubility does not have to be exact, more specifically I think that one can get away with knowing only the solvents and none of the quantitative data. And furthermore, knowing at least the right solvent is better than knowing nothing.
To make it clear, this is all for personal use at the moment, and If I wanted to, id probably just use my PI's notebook.




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[*] posted on 31-3-2021 at 11:55


Check out the HyperLab MegaIndex.... It's a cool way of compiling what has already been done here.



/CJ




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[*] posted on 2-4-2021 at 16:07




Seidell's
“Solubilities of Inorganic and Organic Compounds

Also the solubility data series. (SDS) It has many volumes.

Yob
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thumbup.gif posted on 3-4-2021 at 20:02


Thank you all for your info, all of it is very helpful.



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[*] posted on 4-4-2021 at 10:44


Quote: Originally posted by Texium (zts16)  
If you want to publish new data rather than just compiling existing stuff, there’s going to need to be strict guidelines for verifying the data that is collected. I would not take someone’s word for a melting point of something they made in a home lab without any other analytical data to back it up. Who knows if it was still wet or impure. Same goes for solubility. Before determining that, it needs to be verified that the compound is pure. For organic compounds I would say NMR and HPLC or GC, minimum. Not everyone has access to those, but some people here do and may be willing to test samples. Then the melting point and solubility could be determined but we would need to have a universal protocol that would be followed on how to go about gathering that data.

An effort that that cuts any corners would be worthless.


Bah! What you need is faith...the blinder the better.

One particular problem with solubility is that theres no correlation between solubity and dissolution rate. Plain old NaCl is a great example. Ever tried to make a 30% brine. Ive never been successful as i always use lose patience. Point being jts difficult to do.
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[*] posted on 4-4-2021 at 20:55


Quote: Originally posted by Panache  
Plain old NaCl is a great example. Ever tried to make a 30% brine. Ive never been successful as i always use lose patience. Point being jts difficult to do.
When I make up stock brine solution to use in aqueous workups, I just add about 10% more salt to the bottle than what would be saturated at room temp, and then fill it up with hot water, give it a few shakes and then let it sit. Eventually it mostly dissolves.



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They're not really active right now, but here's my YouTube channel and my blog.
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