Sciencemadness Discussion Board
Not logged in [Login ]
Go To Bottom

Printable Version  
Author: Subject: oil from unknown algae, arachidonic acid
karlosĀ³
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1349
Registered: 10-1-2011
Location: yes!
Member Is Offline

Mood: aminoketonologisch 8)

[*] posted on 22-6-2021 at 11:19
oil from unknown algae, arachidonic acid


So I could get my hands on some chinese algae oil, containing 40% arachidonic acid.
I don't know from which species it originates from, and I couldn't get a CoA either.
I am pretty sure that most of the other compounds are other PUFA's.

Now, I would like to make cannabinoids from it, but the supplier couldn't get(didn't understand) the demand of a CoA...

Can anybody shed some light on the composition of such commercially sold algae oils?
View user's profile View All Posts By User
draculic acid69
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1244
Registered: 2-8-2018
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 27-6-2021 at 01:53


No idea. What do U plan on doing with the arachidonic?
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Tsjerk
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 2455
Registered: 20-4-2005
Location: Netherlands
Member Is Offline

Mood: Mood

[*] posted on 27-6-2021 at 03:41


16S ribosomal DNA sequencing is the first thing that comes to mind, it is normally used to determine bacterial species. But it can be used on chloroplastic DNA, as chloroplastic DNA has a bacterial origin. Do you know someone working in a plant biology lab at a university somewhere? They probably have the primers and the total cost excluding labor would be around 10 euro or so.

Assuming the oil is not highly purified there should be more than enough DNA to do a PCR on.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Antigua
Hazard to Others
***




Posts: 120
Registered: 27-9-2020
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 27-6-2021 at 03:49


Quote: Originally posted by Tsjerk  
16S ribosomal DNA sequencing is the first thing that comes to mind, it is normally used to determine bacterial species. But it can be used on chloroplastic DNA, as chloroplastic DNA has a bacterial origin. Do you know someone working in a plant biology lab at a university somewhere? They probably have the primers and the total cost excluding labor would be around 10 euro or so.

Assuming the oil is not highly purified there should be more than enough DNA to do a PCR on.

Poor child, thinking carl's plans are that fancy.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
karlosĀ³
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1349
Registered: 10-1-2011
Location: yes!
Member Is Offline

Mood: aminoketonologisch 8)

[*] posted on 27-6-2021 at 03:51


Quote: Originally posted by Tsjerk  
16S ribosomal DNA sequencing is the first thing that comes to mind, it is normally used to determine bacterial species. But it can be used on chloroplastic DNA, as chloroplastic DNA has a bacterial origin. Do you know someone working in a plant biology lab at a university somewhere? They probably have the primers and the total cost excluding labor would be around 10 euro or so.

Assuming the oil is not highly purified there should be more than enough DNA to do a PCR on.

Thats a good idea, I might know somebody.
I thought I might find this out by theoretical research, as there probably aren't much species in use, this is better though.

Quote: Originally posted by draculic acid69  
No idea. What do U plan on doing with the arachidonic?

Oh I thought to chlorinate it with oxalyl chloride and then form an amide with an aminoalcohol, I have l-alaninol, isopropanolamine and isobutanolamine in mind for that purpose.
View user's profile View All Posts By User

  Go To Top