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White Yeti
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[*] posted on 15-12-2011 at 15:30
The mad chemist's guide to mushroom hunting


So, something got into me one day when I decided to browse the entire fungi kingdom and summarise all the species that produced interesting and useful chemicals.

It took much time (7-8h) and a lot of dedication but I finally made a list of fungi species that are or could potentially be useful to science. This is by no means a comprehensive list, it's a means to an end that I though I might share with the community.

I made some charts to summarise everything, but I don't really know how to display charts on a thread. So without further ado, the species names are on the left, the substances they produce are on the right. The species are arranged according to the characteristics of the chemicals they produce; let me know what you think:



Antibacterial substances: Chemicals:
Albatrellus subrubescens Scutigeral
Ascocoryne sarcoides Ascocorynin
Coprinellus micaceus Micaceol
Cyathus striatus Striatins (A, B and C)
Cyathus helenae Cyathins
Coprinopsis lagopus Lagopodins
Geastrum fornicatum (Methanol, extract)
Hygrophorus agathosmus (Extract)
Hygrophorus eburneus (Extract)
Handkee utriformis (Extract)
Hydnellum peckii Atromentin
Lycoperdon perlatum (Extract)
Lactarius repraesentaneus (Extract)
Leucopaxillus giganteus Clitocine
Mycena leaiana (Limited activity)
Mycena aurantiomarginata Mycenaaurin A
Mycena haematopus Haematopodin B
Mutinus elegans (Extract)
Pseudoplectania nigrella Plectasin
Piptoporus betulinus (Extract)
Peltigera Methyl and ethyl orsellinates
Pseudevernia furfuracea (Extract)
Phallus indusiatus (Extract)
Usnea Usnic acid

Antifungal substances: Chemicals:
Cyathus striatus Striatins (A, B and C)
Geastrum fornicatum (Methanol extract)
Hygrophorus agathosmus (Extract)
Hygrophorus eburneus (Extract)
Lycoperdon perlatum (Extract)
Mycena galopus 6-hydroxypterulone
Mycena haematopus Haematopodin B
Mycena pura Strobilurin D
Mycena sanguinolenta Hydroxystrobilurin-D
Mycena vitilis Strobilurin B
Mutinus elegans (Extract)
Polytolypa hystricis (Extract)
Pseudoplectania nigrella Plectasin
Polyporus alveolaris Polypeptides (alveolarin)
Trichoderma viride (Extract)
Urnula craterium (Extract)
Usnea Usnic acid
Zythiostroma zythiostromic acid A, and B



Anti-tumor substances: Chemicals:
Agaricus bisporus Lowers levels of estrogen, decreases the risk of breast cancer
Agaricus subrufescens (Extract)
Astraeus hygrometricus Polysaccharide AE2
Coprinellus micaceus (Z,Z)-4-oxo-2,5-heptadienedioic acid
Clavariadelphus truncatus Clavaric acid
Cladonia furcata Polysaccharides
Grifola frondosa (Extract)
Ganoderma lucidum Ganoderic acid
Inonotus obliquus Betulinic acid
Leucopaxillus giganteus (Extract)
Mycena leaiana Leainafulvene
Mycena haematopus Haematopodin B
Meripilus giganteus Methanol extract
Omphalotus olearius Illudin
Polyozellus Polyozellin
Polyporus umbellatus (Extract)
Phellinus linteus Active against breast cancer
Phallus indusiatus (Extract)
Shiitake (Extract and AHCC
Sparassis crispa (Extract)
Xanthoria elegans Preventive, reducing levels of antioxidants
Xylaria hypoxylon Xylarial A and B

Immune system enhancing substances: Chemicals:
Agaricus bisporus Enhances dendritic cell function
Agaricus subrufescens (Extract)
Astraeus hygrometricus (Extract) polysaccharide AE2
Grifola frondosa (Extract)
Inonotus obliquus (Extract)
Pleurotus eryngii (Extract)
Polyporus umbellatus (Extract)
Phellinus linteus (Extract)
Sparassis crispa (Extract)
Tremella mesenterica (Extract)

Antiviral substances: Chemicals:
Agaricus subrufescens (Extract)
Lactarius piperatus (Active against warts)
Umbilicaria esculenta (Extract)
Xanthoria parietina (Extract)


Mycotoxins: Chemicals:
Inocybe erubescens Muscarine
Gyromitra esculenta Gyromitrin
Letharia vulpina Vulpinic acid

Psychoactive: Chemicals:
Amanita muscaria
Amanita panterina var. panterina
Ibotenic acid
Muscimol
Muscazone
Claviceps purpurea Ergotamine
Psilocybe Various hallucinogens

Enzyme inhibitors: Chemicals:
Amanita abrupta Propargylglycine
Crucibulum Salfredin B11
Coprinopsis atramentaria 1-aminocyclopropanol
coprine metabolite
Coprinellus micaceus (Z,Z)-4-oxo-2,5-heptadienedioic acid
Grifola frondosa Inhibits cyclooxygenase
Peltigera Tenuiorin and methyl orsellinate
Phallus indusiatus 5-(hydroxymethyl)-2-furfural
Ramaria botrytis Nicotianamine

Hemolytic substances: Chemicals:
Amanita rubescens (Extract)
Laetiporus sulphureus LSL


Anti-inflamatory substances: Chemicals:
Astraeus hygrometricus Ethanol extract
Geastrum saccatum β-glucan–protein complex
Inonotus obliquus (Extract)
Lactarius blennius Blennin-A
Piptoporus betulinus (Extract)
Polyporus umbellatus (Extract)
Phellinus linteus (Extract)??
Phallus indusiatus Alkaline extract
Suillus americanus Beta glucans

Antioxidants: Chemicals:
Astraeus hygrometricus Ethanol extract
Cyathus stercoreus Cyathuscavins
Enokitake Ergothioneine
Grifola frondosa (Extract)
Geastrum saccatum β-glucan–protein complex
Hericium erinaceus Threitol, D-arabinitol, palmitic acid
Inonotus obliquus Polyphenolic extract
Leucopaxillus giganteus Phenols and flavonoids
Peltigera (Extract)
Phallus indusiatus (Extract) polyphenols
Ramaria botrytis Protocatechuic acid (PCA)



Potentially useful for cellulosic biofuel:
Brettanomyces claussenii
Fomitopsis palustris
Trichoderma reesei
Lowering cholesterol
Auricularia polytricha

Useful enzymes: Enzyme:
Brettanomyces bruxellensis Vinylphenol reductase

Lectin containing mushrooms:
Clavaria zollingeri
Sarcoscypha coccinea

Sterols:
Coprinellus micaceus Micaceol

Activity against Alzheimer’s disease: Chemicals:
Cortinarius infractus infractopicrin and 10-hydroxy-infractopicrin

Nematicides: Chemicals:
Galiella rufa Pregaliellactone, galiellactone
Piptoporus betulinus (Extract)

Signaling molecule inhibitor:
Galiella rufa Galiellactone Interleukin-6 inhibitor


Immunodepressants: Chemicals:
Isaria sinclairii Myriocin
Tolypocladium inflatum Ciclosporin

Insecticidal mushrooms:
Lactarius fumosus (Extract) chromenes

Lowering cholesterol:
Pleurotus ostreatus Lovastatin

Neuroprotective:
Phallus indusiatus Dictyoquinazoles A, B and C

Antimalarial:
Russula brevipes Sesquiterpene lactones




Treatment for diabetes:
Agaricus campestris (Extract)
Grifola frondosa (Extract)

Random compounds: Chemicals:
Hydnellum aurantiacum Aurantiacin
Mycena rosea Mycenarubin A and B
Schizophyllum commune Hydrophobin
Xanthoria parietina Parietin
Lactarius volemus Rubber

Anticoagulants: Chemicals:
Auricularia polytricha (Extract)
Hydnellum peckii Atromentin
Phallus impudicus (Extract)


Unclassified:
Neotyphodium
Laricifomes officinalis (used to treat tuberculosis)
Cladonia rangiferina
Ganoderma
Lobaria pulmonaria
Maitake (many things)
Macrolepiota procera
Ophiocordyceps sinensis
Ophiocordyceps unilateralis
Trametes versicolor
Tremella fuciformis
Wolfiporia extensa

The above species or categories were not included in the tables due to either the diversity of bioactive compounds they produce, or because of the exotic nature of the bioactive compounds found in their extracts. Nevertheless, these species have a significant range of compounds with applications in medicine and biochemistry.





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aaparatuss
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[*] posted on 15-12-2011 at 16:49


its a good start to to a chemists mushroom guide...complete with color plates and structures!

a cactus version would also be a dream
i recently bought a living baseball cactus....a 2005 paper suggests cancer curing potential



[Edited on 16-12-2011 by aaparatuss]
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[*] posted on 15-12-2011 at 17:16


Nice list! I have always been interested in the fungi kingdom, so much of it is yet unexplored, so i think there is a lot of potential for new medicines and other compounds.



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White Yeti
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[*] posted on 15-12-2011 at 17:24


Quote: Originally posted by aaparatuss  
its a good start to to a chemists mushroom guide...complete with color plates and structures!

a cactus version would also be a dream
i recently bought a living baseball cactus....a 2005 paper suggests cancer curing potential


Thanks! I know it's not complete but most of the information is there.

As much as I would like to make a dichotomous key to go along with this list, I'm afraid that the pictures and diagrams would drain all the ink out of my printer.

I was thinking about making a sequel list of plants along the same lines as this. But to be honest, browsing the entire fungi kingdom was tedious, and I fear that the plant kingdom might be even worse. Plants also make an enormous diversity of chemicals that have multiple uses, not just against bacteria, or cancer, or fungi etc... This would make classifying them into groups even more difficult.




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[*] posted on 15-12-2011 at 20:15


I have always wondered about the feasibility of extracting methylhydrazine from poisonous mushrooms.
The species gyromitra esculenta (somtimes called a "false morel") produces the toxin gyromitrin, which is actually acetaldehyde methylformylhydrazone and N-methyl-N-formylhydrazine. These mushrooms can contain up to 0.3% of the toxin by weight. These volatile hydrazine derivitives should be able to hydrolyse to methylhydrazine under alkaline or acidic conditions.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gyromitrin
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[*] posted on 16-12-2011 at 04:31


White Yeti,

Thanks alot for summarizing these info on mushroom.I've also interested in mushroom's chemical usage in medicine (and also poisons:o),but I guess it just took me a great time to do what you just do.:P

Anyway,Thank alot!:)

p/s:I thought this may help to grow the list,

Attachment: Utilisationofmacrofungispecies.pdf (143kB)
This file has been downloaded 845 times

[Edited on 16-12-2011 by kuro96inlaila]




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White Yeti
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[*] posted on 16-12-2011 at 12:50


Thanks for the link kuro.

I forgot to mention that I intentionally stayed away from mycotoxins and hallucinogens. The reason being that you don't need to do much searching to find the deadliest mushroom in the fungi kingdom (death cap). As for hallucinogens, it almost seems like hallucinogenic mushrooms are the most extensively documented mushrooms out there, I don't know why. I wanted to make a list of obscure mushrooms that have amazing, out of the ordinary properties.

I think it's difficult to find mushrooms that can cure cancer or that can boost your immune system; one has to do much searching to find them. Strangely enough, finding info on deadly or hallucinogenic mushrooms is much easier than finding info on cancer curing mushrooms.

@kuro96inalaila If you're really interested in mycotoxins, there is one mushroom (the name of which shall remain unspoken and that I have forgotten) that contains a poison that is undetectable in blood, tasteless, odorless and destroys the kidneys several weeks after ingestion. It's such a perfect weapon that I'm sure the internet censors this kind of stuff.

Plant sequel coming soon, once I figure out how to classify chemicals from an entirely different beast of a phylum.




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[*] posted on 16-12-2011 at 12:55


Quote: Originally posted by AndersHoveland  
I have always wondered about the feasibility of extracting methylhydrazine from poisonous mushrooms.
The species gyromitra esculenta (somtimes called a "false morel") produces the toxin gyromitrin, which is actually acetaldehyde methylformylhydrazone and N-methyl-N-formylhydrazine. These mushrooms can contain up to 0.3% of the toxin by weight. These volatile hydrazine derivitives should be able to hydrolyse to methylhydrazine under alkaline or acidic conditions.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gyromitrin


I included gyrometrin, but focused primarily on chemicals that are difficult to make in large quantities in a lab. I'm not 100% sure, but I think gyrometrin can be synthesised in much larger quantities more economically than extracting from wild mushrooms, unless small quantities were needed.




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[*] posted on 16-12-2011 at 16:35


Cool list. I am still trying to catalog the various mushrooms that grow on my property (it's wet and wooded... there are a lot).
I notice that while you list grifola frondosa under 'immune system enhancing' you list maitake (same mushroom!) at the end under 'Unclassified'. Personally I list them under 'yummy' and 'saleable' but I guess science does not recognize those categories :P
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[*] posted on 16-12-2011 at 18:00


Quote: Originally posted by bbartlog  

I notice that while you list grifola frondosa under 'immune system enhancing' you list maitake (same mushroom!) at the end under 'Unclassified'. Personally I list them under 'yummy' and 'saleable' but I guess science does not recognize those categories :P


Bahh... I thought I didn't make any significant maitakes :) Sorry about that! A few errors slip through, unfortunately, I'll fix that on the master list right now.
Speaking of prized mushrooms, I could also have included morcella esculenta because it also produces some bioactive chemicals, but since it's such a prized mushroom, I'd rather sell it or cook with it rather than extract chemicals, using it for chemicals would be a complete and utter waste, I understand.

I didn't want to omit too many species either because if I eliminated all the prized mushrooms, the list would be significantly shorter, and I wouldn't be able to call it a complete list.




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[*] posted on 20-12-2011 at 23:21


Matsutake mushrooms are a seasonal delicacy in Japan.

You might be able to find them in an ethnic Japanese supermarket or specialty restaurant.
They are available only in the autumn and are fairly expensive, 7 to 10 euros per single mushroom!

They have a strange taste. Pungent and a little spicy, almost like cinnamon, but not quite in the same exact way, suggestive that they may contain some sort of aldehyde. Of course they have a deep "earthy" taste. There also seems to be a subtle flavor of spearmint.

The mushrooms seem to have a small psychlogical effect, which only becomes pronounced after ingestion of several mushrooms. There is a feeling of euphoria, or at least similar to breathing nitrous oxide. The effects are very mild, so do not spend so much money and then be dissapointed. :P

I would be very interested to know what type of interesting compounds are found in these mushrooms.

Here are some pictures of the mushrooms growing in their natural habitate (site is swedish) :
http://www.goliatmusseron.blogspot.com/
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[*] posted on 21-12-2011 at 12:34


Quote: Originally posted by AndersHoveland  

They are available only in the autumn and are fairly expensive, 7 to 10 euros per single mushroom![...]
The mushrooms seem to have a small psychlogical effect, which only becomes pronounced after ingestion of several mushrooms. There is a feeling of euphoria, or at least similar to breathing nitrous oxide. The effects are very mild, so do not spend so much money and then be dissapointed. :P

I would be very interested to know what type of interesting compounds are found in these mushrooms.[...]


Interesting, I did come across this mushroom while searching across the web, but I didn't think it would be of any value to biochemistry. Its high price would also restrict any kind of amateur research on compounds found in this mushroom.

Thanks for sharing! I'll see if I can find enough documentation on this mushroom so that it can make its way onto the list.




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[*] posted on 30-1-2012 at 12:50


What a great thread. To scare you - you can look up the acacia family and their "active" alkaloids... Wikipedia used to have a wonderful table. It may still be there. Incredible plants.

Mushrooms are very undiscovered. They are now using mycellium for car parts - the interior panels, as well as insulation and petro-chemical clean ups.

They have a potential that is yet to be maximized.

again thanks for the table.
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[*] posted on 30-1-2012 at 13:18


Quote: Originally posted by GreenD  
What a great thread. To scare you - you can look up the acacia family and their "active" alkaloids... Wikipedia used to have a wonderful table. It may still be there. Incredible plants.


You're very welcome!

About the acacia family, I actually started some research, but didn't have the chance to finish. Plants are also amazing and much more diverse than fungi, which makes classification much more difficult.

For fungi, I didn't have a hard time, most made antibacterial, antifungal or anticancer chemicals.




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[*] posted on 22-2-2012 at 21:33


Here are a few interesting , fruiting fungi I saw while walking the dog. Not sure on the taxonomy yet.









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[*] posted on 23-2-2012 at 07:20


I like the latter one, the first could be a member of the Inocybe genus--I swear I've seen those gills.

[Edited on 2-23-2012 by AirCowPeaCock]




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[*] posted on 23-2-2012 at 13:00


Nice mushrooms Bot.
I found some out-of-season mushrooms since I posted this thread. Here are some pics:
IMG_0324 downsize.jpg - 438kB
IMG_0316 downsize.jpg - 120kB
I'm pretty sure this is Trametes versicolor, but I should never bee 100% sure with anything I do.
I picked them on Christmas day:)

I'm still an amateur, I only started this mushrooming hobby last year and I'm impatiently waiting for this year's mushroom season. It gets really rainy where I live, perfect for mushroom hunting. But unfortunately, you can also find some of the deadliest mushrooms and look-alikes around here.




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[*] posted on 23-2-2012 at 13:23


This year I'm afraid mushrooms are going to be scarce. We had a near-snowless winter..i.e. not so much water this spring. And some of the early spring mushrooms are my favorite edibles, and some of the late spring mushrooms are some of my favorites. Last year I got ~ a pound of black morels just from my yard last spring. A poor spring may even effect the fall harvest (the really big mushrooms! I got 10+ pounds of Sulfur shelf last fall)



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[*] posted on 23-2-2012 at 15:55


This year has been remarkable so far (in a bad way). Snow in October, no significant snow ever since, a little bit of rain, overcast most of the time, mild temperatures etc...

We can only wonder what spring will bring. Fall is really the best time for mushroom hunting. All that rain in the summer makes mushrooms sprout, well, like mushrooms.




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[*] posted on 23-2-2012 at 19:10


Quote: Originally posted by White Yeti  

I'm pretty sure this is Trametes versicolor, but I should never bee 100% sure with anything I do.


Trametes I'd say for sure, but maybe gibbosa instead of versicolor ? Best to ask an expert if it matters (which would not be me).




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[*] posted on 24-2-2012 at 12:40


Quote: Originally posted by bbartlog  

Trametes I'd say for sure, but maybe gibbosa instead of versicolor ? Best to ask an expert if it matters (which would not be me).


I can see why you'd think that, but the colours on this mushroom are much too vivid. As you can see, the close-up I made shows a vivid blue colour and distinct bands of differing colours.

If the picture size limit was above 800p, I could have uploaded a bigger picture where you would be able to zoom in and see the mushrooms in great detail.




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[*] posted on 26-3-2012 at 01:43


Take spore prints to help identify the mushrooms, a microscope would be very helpful.
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[*] posted on 29-7-2012 at 12:59


Here is the original document I should have attached to the thread in the first place.

Attachment: mushrooms.docx (133kB)
This file has been downloaded 1235 times




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[*] posted on 31-7-2012 at 12:12


Thanks for the link, very well organized
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[*] posted on 17-8-2012 at 04:57


Thanks for the list, I saved it. I just finished my chemistry degree, but I think I am going to enter into the mycology field, it is still very under-studied and has the potential for a lot of new compounds and natural products!

That being said, I saw this documentary at 3am on public television two years ago, and it changed my life. Professor Strobel is an amazing scientist, and I was absolutely blown away by his work, which is shortly outlined in this ~45 minute long documentary.

http://www.snagfilms.com/films/title/jewels_of_the_jungle

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