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Author: Subject: Most extreme compounds known to man
neptunium
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[*] posted on 29-12-2011 at 09:02


lol!! indeed!
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phlogiston
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[*] posted on 29-12-2011 at 15:02


A good contender for the most expensive element must be flerovium (officially still named Ununquadium, Uuq, element 114). The production of 12 atoms of it took a year to produce at a facility that burns approximately 100 million US dollars a year.

[Edited on 29-12-2011 by phlogiston]




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hissingnoise
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[*] posted on 30-12-2011 at 03:05


And the race is now on for measurable quantities of the expected super, super rare holyshitium!


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neptunium
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[*] posted on 30-12-2011 at 07:44


theres an old theory about a valley of stability beyond element 120 ... hollyshitium might be in that area
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Elawr
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[*] posted on 19-1-2012 at 22:11


Tellurium hexafluoride, a toxic, unstable compound which is gaseous at room temperature with density greater than 10grams/liter. I know of no other denser vapor. You could almost float a boat in pool of this stuff!



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UnintentionalChaos
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[*] posted on 19-1-2012 at 22:42


Quote: Originally posted by Elawr  
Tellurium hexafluoride, a toxic, unstable compound which is gaseous at room temperature with density greater than 10grams/liter. I know of no other denser vapor. You could almost float a boat in pool of this stuff!


WF6 has you beat. :D It's just barely a gas at room temp, though.




Department of Redundancy Department - Now with paperwork!

'In organic synthesis, we call decomposition products "crap", however this is not a IUPAC approved nomenclature.' -Nicodem
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GreenD
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[*] posted on 20-1-2012 at 07:21


I'm not sure which one but cryptands or clathrochelates chelate metal ions so irreversibly that they can never escape, except if you denature or destroy the organic molecule. Hence "Crypt"-and and "Clathr-ochelates. Clath means bar or cage.

(Think EDTA but with a vengence)



[Edited on 20-1-2012 by GreenD]
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GreenD
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[*] posted on 20-1-2012 at 07:26


Quote: Originally posted by Sedit  
Total annihilation goes against what one normally looks for in the conclusion of any conflict, we normally look for total conformity, destroying our opposition is just a sad side effect of oppressing there will power.


You need someone left over to buy your subsidized corn and little trinkets... Go capitalism!
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rstar
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[*] posted on 20-1-2012 at 09:13


Is there a gas so-called "Oxygen" ?
I recently heard that it acts as a good oxidant , but some say another gas (i think they called it "flauriine" or "florine" somewhat) acts much better oxidant. :P




"A tidy laboratory means a lazy chemist "
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neptunium
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[*] posted on 20-1-2012 at 11:25


Quote: Originally posted by rstar  
Is there a gas so-called "Oxygen" ?
I recently heard that it acts as a good oxidant , but some say another gas (i think they called it "flauriine" or "florine" somewhat) acts much better oxidant. :P

yup been talked about at the begining already...




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AndersHoveland
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[*] posted on 20-1-2012 at 22:56


What about the most extreme aphrodesiac compound? :D

There is a plant grown in Southeast Asia called Tongkat ali (Eurycoma Longifolia). Researchers from the School of Pharmaceutical Sciences in Malaysia, did tests which suggested that the root of Tongkat ali stimulates sexual arousal in rats. The Asian Congress of Sexology published a paper in 2002 showing that consumption of the plant increased testosterone levels in humans.
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0367326X10...
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neptunium
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[*] posted on 21-1-2012 at 08:11


too bad it wont grow in my back yard..



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AndersHoveland
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[*] posted on 21-1-2012 at 12:25


Quote: Originally posted by neptunium  
too bad it wont grow in my back yard..


don't worry, there is always ecstacy or rohypnol :D

Bufadienolides can be derived from toad venom, but can lead to side effects including chest pain, abdominal pain and vomiting,
disrupting the normal rhythm of the heart, and sometimes death.

Cantharidin is a powerful irritant vesicant (blister-inducing) substance obtained from blister beetles. It is claimed to have aphrodisiac properties, as a result of its irritant effects upon the body's genitourinary tract, and can result in poisoning if ingested.
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White Yeti
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[*] posted on 22-1-2012 at 10:35


"giver of bad advice"

How fitting!:D




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AirCowPeaCock
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[*] posted on 22-1-2012 at 12:50


Quote: Originally posted by shivas  
Quote: Originally posted by paulr1234  
Most potent inorganic neurotoxin (I think Botulism is actually the most potent neurotoxin but given that it is a naturally occurring protein, I'm not sure where it should sit in a chemical taxonomy).


Botulinum is in fact the most acutely toxic substance known. Less than a kilo is enough to kill the whole planet.


Amazing that means 143 nano grams can kill one person!




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Mr. Wizard
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[*] posted on 22-1-2012 at 22:43


Mono atomic Hydrogen combining to form H2. The reaction of H + H =H2 +422 kJ energy is more powerful than any other chemical reaction per unit mass. Some work has been done studying small amounts of H monatomic gas at very low (< 1K) temperatures and using a strong magnetic field. The gas has been used in Atomic hydrogen welding, but is generated at the tips of Tungsten electrodes in an arc, and only lasts until it strikes the cooler surfaces of the 'work', where it combines to produce it's prodigious energy. As a comparison 2 H2(g) + O2(g) → 2 H2O(l) + 572 kJ (286 kJ/mol) which weighs 36 grams per Mole of product, or 18 times as heavy.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrogen

http://www.weldingarticle.com/atomic-hydrogen-welding/atomic...

and 'cough' ;-)
http://www.lateralscience.co.uk/AtomicH/atomicH.html

http://www.science.uva.nl/research/quant/sph.html
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AndersHoveland
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[*] posted on 24-1-2012 at 00:05


Would it theoretically be possible to stabilize large quantities of monoatomic hydrogen using a powerful superconducting magnet and very cold temperatures?
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AirCowPeaCock
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[*] posted on 24-1-2012 at 08:27


Quote: Originally posted by Mr. Wizard  
Mono atomic Hydrogen combining to form H2. The reaction of H + H =H2 +422 kJ energy is more powerful than any other chemical reaction per unit mass. Some work has been done studying small amounts of H monatomic gas at very low (< 1K) temperatures and using a strong magnetic field. The gas has been used in Atomic hydrogen welding, but is generated at the tips of Tungsten electrodes in an arc, and only lasts until it strikes the cooler surfaces of the 'work', where it combines to produce it's prodigious energy. As a comparison 2 H2(g) + O2(g) → 2 H2O(l) + 572 kJ (286 kJ/mol) which weighs 36 grams per Mole of product, or 18 times as heavy.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrogen

http://www.weldingarticle.com/atomic-hydrogen-welding/atomic...

and 'cough' ;-)
http://www.lateralscience.co.uk/AtomicH/atomicH.html

http://www.science.uva.nl/research/quant/sph.html


Is that where alot of the energy released from Hydride, alkali and alkaline earth metals reacting with water come from?

[Edited on 1-24-2012 by AirCowPeaCock]

[Edited on 1-24-2012 by AirCowPeaCock]




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Mr. Wizard
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[*] posted on 24-1-2012 at 10:14


I think the energy of alkaline hydrides reacting with water is from the alkaline metal combining with oxygen provided by the water. When an alkaline hydride reacts with water the existing bonds between the hydrogen and the metal have to be broken, and the energy of breaking the bonds in water also have to be broken. The 'bottom line' total of energy liberated no doubt includes the formation of H2 as well as alkaline oxides, hydroxides, hydrated hydroxides and other products far beyond my knowledge.

This 'entry' to the extreme compounds list was because of the high energy available from this simple and ubiquitous allotrope molecule. It is mostly unrecognized by most because it is so hard to keep it in from combining we never see it. Its energy density, energy, reaction (burning?) temperature , and difficulty of isolation are all extreme.



[Edited on 24-1-2012 by Mr. Wizard]
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[*] posted on 24-1-2012 at 10:44


It is pretty cool. I never knew that about mono-atomic hydrogen, I never really consider it much, because it hardly exists in everyday...stuff. the closest we really get is H- and protons. But now thinking about it again, in hydride reactions, its really H- and H+ so would it have the same energy?



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Methyl.Magic
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[*] posted on 24-1-2012 at 14:16


The most acidic compound is neither the SbF6 nor the perfluorocarborane but Hydroheliumic acid HeH+ with a pKa of -60 !!!! But it's more a physical compound than a chemical one ...

The MOST HEAVY is Osmium.

The MOST LIGHT is aerogel.

The MOST TOXIC is polonium or botulinium

The MOST COLD is liquid Helium

The MOST BASIC is probably t-Butylcesium if it exists.

The organotellurium have the palm of the most putrid compound. Chemistry of telluride cannot be really investigated because chemists wouldnt work with this element anymore since they lost their wife and their friends because when some telluride compound are in the body they slowly diffuses a stroug garlic odour out of the skin that can lasts up to one year according to some source I've forgotten...

What is the most hard, the best reducing agent, the most complexe one, the most ?
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[*] posted on 24-1-2012 at 14:47


Quote: Originally posted by Methyl.Magic  
The most acidic compound is Hydroheliumic acid HeH+ with a pKa of -60 !!!!


It may be the most "acidic" molecular species, but the positively charged ions cannot be considered a compound itself, especially in light of the fact that it would protonate any known anion. HeH+ has never been isolated into a condensed compound.

Quote: Originally posted by Methyl.Magic  

The MOST BASIC is probably t-Butylcesium if it exists.


I would have guessed cesium boride, but the compound sodium boride does not seem to exist, at least not in the proportion Na3B. This should not really be too surprising. Potassium nitride is also extremely basic (equivalent to at least >26 pKa), but only small quantities have ever been prepared because the compound is not very stable (nitrogen gas will not react with potassium at any temperature). Another unusual organic compound, 1,8-bis(hexamethyltriaminophosphazenyl)naphthalene, has unusually high affinity for protons, and as such has a pK of 29.9 in acetonitrile! also see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lithium_tetramethylpiperidide

Trying to determine the "strongest" base is somewhat relative, because compounds can be "basic" in different ways. Similarly, reducing agents can also be reducing in different ways. For example, potassium will easily reduce lithium chloride, but it is lithium that can reduce nitrogen gas, not potassium.

[Edited on 24-1-2012 by AndersHoveland]
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AirCowPeaCock
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[*] posted on 24-1-2012 at 14:50


does Hydroheliumic acid even exist? I got no Google hits. Source?



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[*] posted on 24-1-2012 at 14:56


Scratch that, I found it.



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White Yeti
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[*] posted on 24-1-2012 at 15:19


There's an "edit" button in the right hand corner of every post for the first 48 hours, you can delete your post(s) if you want.



"Ja, Kalzium, das ist alles!" -Otto Loewi
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