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Author: Subject: Most extreme compounds known to man
Theoretic
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[*] posted on 27-4-2016 at 21:23


Quote: Originally posted by crystal grower  
Quote: Originally posted by Theoretic  
Quote: Originally posted by crystal grower  

Actually, the most abundant mineral on the earth is probably bridgmanite, according to this:
http://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/most-abundant-miner...

The LEAST common mineral:

"Until recent years jadeite has been something of a mystery mineral, but we now know of primary sources in Guatemala as well as several California occurrences of white or grayish jadeite. Boulders in which a few small freestanding crystals have been seen occur in San Benito Co., California, with additional finds in Clear Creek, between New Idria and Hernandez. All Mexican jadeite is in artifacts, from unknown sources. The record price for a single piece of jadeite jewelry was set at the November 1997 Christie's Hong Kong sale: Lot 1843, the "Doubly Fortunate" necklace of 27 approximately .5 mm jadeite beads sold for US$9.3 million."

[Edited on 27-4-2016 by Theoretic]

To be accurate isn't astatine thought to be rarest mineral?

I was kidding, the least common mineral isn't known, because it's too rare to be discovered :P
Astatine would be indeed the least common element, unless there are traces of americium formed from neutron capture in uranium ores (though this is unlikely). Edit: no it's not, one just needs only two more neutron captures after making Pu-239. So there are probably a few atoms floating about :D

[Edited on 28-4-2016 by Theoretic]




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[*] posted on 28-4-2016 at 02:18


The "blackest black", ie the least reflective material currently known is also interesting.

It is called "vantablack" (Vertically Aligned NanoTube Arrays), and objects coated with it look pretty much like a hole in space, with no visible surface.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vantablack




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[*] posted on 28-4-2016 at 02:29


Can't remember whether anyone brought this up.

Chlorine trifluoride is the most powerful fluorinating agent known to man. When heated, it decomposes to boiling HF and HCl. It sets fire to anything, including asbestos and concrete.




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[*] posted on 28-4-2016 at 02:49


Can't remember whether anyone brought this up.

Chlorine trifluoride is the most powerful fluorinating agent known to man. When heated, it decomposes to boiling HF and HCl. It sets fire to anything, including asbestos and concrete.




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[*] posted on 28-4-2016 at 03:00


Quote: Originally posted by a nitrogen rich explosive  
[...]Chlorine trifluoride is the most powerful fluorinating agent known to man. When heated, it decomposes to boiling HF and HCl.[...]

Remarkable! The compound is so energetic that it is capable of producing hydrogen atoms out of nothing. Or does it break up part of its atoms into protons and neutrons :D ?

[Edited on 28-4-16 by woelen]




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[*] posted on 28-4-2016 at 03:12


I think dioxygen difluoride beats ClF3.
It goes by the lovely descriptive name of FOOF. (For reasons that are obvious if you think about it.)

Derek Lowe gave a wonderful description of its preparation, properties and behaviour here.




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[*] posted on 28-4-2016 at 11:27


Dioxygen difluoride? You're having a laugh! :D
Scary stuff. Why FOOF?




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[*] posted on 28-4-2016 at 12:50


"Foof" describes a puff of gas emitted from a flask wherein a tiny amount of F-O-O-F has decomposed. A larger explosion is not quite accurately depicted as a "foof", but more of a "HOLY SHIT RUN AWAAAAAY".

Also, I'm pretty sure that KAgF4/HF aka AgF2+/HF is the strongest fluorinating agent; it fluorinates krypton and oxidizes Pt to PtF6. Remember not to confuse potassium fluoroargentate (II), KAgF3, with potassium fluoroargentate (III), KAgF4; the former is reactive, but the latter is ridiculously reactive.
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[*] posted on 28-4-2016 at 13:06


Ah. Right.
I have had the joy of working with chlorine trifluoride. Once. The fluorine fire burnt through a house brick.

Personally, the scariest compound for me is either azeotropic perchloric acid making paper explode, or the heptanitropentane I have synthesised. Some batches are extremely stable. Some are friction sensitive.

I am also working on dihydrazino furoxan perchlorate and tetrammine copper hexamethylene triperoxide diamine perchlorate. Peroxyde ion is allergic to Cu...




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[*] posted on 28-4-2016 at 22:39


Quote: Originally posted by phlogiston  
The "blackest black", ie the least reflective material currently known is also interesting.

It is called "vantablack" (Vertically Aligned NanoTube Arrays), and objects coated with it look pretty much like a hole in space, with no visible surface.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vantablack

Free-standing graphene, however (probably) beats that. A single layer of it absorbs two and a half percent of incident light.
(2.6% of green, 2.3% of red, to be precise)



(its bro, borophene, is more conductive, but highly transparent, and might displace indium-tin oxide for some uses)




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[*] posted on 16-4-2019 at 00:32


Sorry for bumping this but I found an interesting discussion about the highest molarity possible:
https://www.researchgate.net/post/What_is_the_highest_concen...




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[*] posted on 16-4-2019 at 12:53


Silver (still) has the highest bulk conductivity at room temperature of any material.

Graphene may have slightly higher conductivity in certain directions, but this has only been observed at nanoscale. Alloys are invariably worse conductors than parent metals. Ceramics and polymers have yet to approach metallic conductivity.

Pyrolytic graphite, IIRC, has the lowest susceptibility, i.e., the highest coefficient of diamagnetic levitation. Again, advanced materials are worthless here.

Polybutadiene has the highest elastic efficiency of any synthetic material; this is defined as the ratio of the work done by the stretched material in relaxing to the work required to stretch it. Elastin and resilin, natural polymeric proteins, are more efficient. Resilin has an elastic efficiency of ~97% compared to ~80% for polybutadiene.





[Edited on 04-20-1969 by clearly_not_atara]
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[*] posted on 17-4-2019 at 23:07


Can't believe no ones mentioned it yet: strongest stimulant- methamphetamine which keeps people awake and going for 3-4 days, or strongest opiate: 3fluroanilo methoxyacetylfentanyl 18000-26000 times stronger than morphine and lsd as the strongest psychedelic at 10000 doses per gram. Or per my post about peptides and there retail price which when sold by the 10mg vial retails at $8000 per gram putting it up there as one of the most expensive organic compounds.what a cool thread.
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