Sciencemadness Discussion Board
Not logged in [Login ]
Go To Bottom

Printable Version  
Author: Subject: Hydroxylamine --> sulfamic A .Reversible?
starman
National Hazard
****




Posts: 318
Registered: 5-7-2008
Location: Western Australia
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 17-8-2012 at 18:54
Hydroxylamine --> sulfamic A .Reversible?


The action of sulfur dioxide on hydroxylamine (or hydroxylammonium salts) is a well known route to sulfamic acid.

(NH3OH2)2 SO4 + 2SO2 --> 2NH2SO3H + H2SO4

Is this reaction reversible in practice?




Chemistry- The journey from the end of physics to the beginning of life.(starman)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
aaparatuss
Harmless
*




Posts: 41
Registered: 12-7-2011
Location: indepth
Member Is Offline

Mood: questing

[*] posted on 17-8-2012 at 19:03


maybe with liquid oxygen and a very little axe
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Nicodem
Super Moderator
*******




Posts: 4230
Registered: 28-12-2004
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 18-8-2012 at 01:41


Quote: Originally posted by starman  
The action of sulfur dioxide on hydroxylamine (or hydroxylammonium salts) is a well known route to sulfamic acid.

(NH3OH2)2 SO4 + 2SO2 --> 2NH2SO3H + H2SO4

Is this reaction reversible in practice?

Every reaction step is reversible, but the equilibrium constant can be anything from near zero to near infinity. And consider also that the majority of reactions take course in a series of reaction steps, each having its own equilibrium! For this reason, it is unreasonable to expect a redox reaction like this one, with the two sides thermodynamically so extremely far apart, to possibly be reversible in any of the common sense of this term. Paradoxically however, it is "in principle" reversible, but nothing more than that. That's why the reversibility is a an arbitrary concept. When evaluating reversibility, all you need to do, is ask yourself: "Can the reversibility of the reaction, under any circumstances whatsoever, affect any of the observable results?"

See also https://www.sciencemadness.org/whisper/viewthread.php?tid=19...




…there is a human touch of the cultist “believer” in every theorist that he must struggle against as being unworthy of the scientist. Some of the greatest men of science have publicly repudiated a theory which earlier they hotly defended. In this lies their scientific temper, not in the scientific defense of the theory. - Weston La Barre (Ghost Dance, 1972)

Read the The ScienceMadness Guidelines!
View user's profile View All Posts By User
barley81
National Hazard
****




Posts: 481
Registered: 9-5-2011
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 18-8-2012 at 07:27


Hydrolysis of sulfamic acid will give you ammonium bisulfate. Hydroxylamine can be made by reacting sulfur dioxide with potassium nitrite to produce potassium hydroxylamine disulfonate (which crystallizes; adding extra potassium salts increases yield through the common-ion effect). The resulting salt is then hydrolyzed to produce hydroxylamine sulfate. Take a look at Brauer's amazing handbook of inorganic recipes in the Sciencemadness library for more hydroxylamine chemistry.
View user's profile View All Posts By User

  Go To Top