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Author: Subject: Older Chemistry Books for Kids and/or Beginners?
Jekyllstein
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[*] posted on 26-8-2013 at 14:30
Older Chemistry Books for Kids and/or Beginners?


Just spent some very nostalgic moments looking through this site's online copy of "The Golden Book of Chemistry Experiments," which took me back to my youth.

I received a chemistry set one year for Christmas, and before long had expanded it into a modest little garage chemistry lab (funded by lawn mowing jobs, and stocked with "Perfect"-brand chemicals, glassware, and apparatus purchased from local hobby shops and pharmacies).

I used to ride my bike to the public library, where I repeatedly checked out "The Golden Book of Chemistry Experiments," and other books like it. Such books, with their emphasis on hands-on experiments you could do at home with a modest investment in real lab gear, seem a rarity nowadays. I've been trying to recall some of my own favorite titles from yesteryear, but so far the only one I can come up with is "Chemistry Magic" by Kenneth M. Swezey.

Can anyone perhaps recall or suggest any other, similar such works along the lines of the Golden book, or of Mr. Swezey's book -- introductory works aimed either at juveniles or at rank beginners of whatever age, and with the same sort of old-school, real-home-lab experimental focus?

(Most of the rest of what I've looked at in the online Library here is a bit more advanced than the sort of kid-friendly or absolute-beginner-friendly material I'm hoping to find.)

The one contemporary example that I know of is, of course, Robert Bruce Thompson's "Illustrated Guide to Home Chemistry Experiments" ("All Lab, No Lecture"!). It's a much more recent (and rare) example of precisely the sort of thing I have in mind. It's just that I can also recall older, similar sorts of works from my youth, and I would welcome a chance to re-acquaint myself with some of them... if I could only remember some of their titles.

Thanks in advance.


[Edited on 26-8-2013 by Jekyllstein]

[Edited on 26-8-2013 by Jekyllstein]
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hyfalcon
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[*] posted on 26-8-2013 at 14:46


Suggested science books for the pupil and teacher.

http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015021781326;vie...

Bottom of page 11 is the section on chemistry.

[Edited on 26-8-2013 by hyfalcon]
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Jekyllstein
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[*] posted on 26-8-2013 at 15:12


Thanks for that list. It's nice to see Swezey's book is included in it.
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bob800
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[*] posted on 26-8-2013 at 15:38


I would recommend: Burton L. Hawk's Experiments for the Home Lab, available for download on Google books; and 1930's Popular Science articles available at: http://blog.modernmechanix.com/category/science/chemistry/
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ElectroWin
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[*] posted on 26-8-2013 at 16:27


an excellent turn of the century work (19th to 20th) is:
Experimental chemistry for high school students, by Walter Monroe 1899
http://archive.org/details/experimentalchem00monrrich
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Jekyllstein
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[*] posted on 27-8-2013 at 04:52


Thanks for all of the links, everyone.

I found Hawk's volume at Google books, but it said "no e-book available." Is it no longer possible to download?

[Edited on 8/27/2013 by Jekyllstein]
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