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Hawkguy
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[*] posted on 10-2-2015 at 19:43


Quote: Originally posted by Molecular Manipulations  
Nice TheAustralianScientist, looks to me like the ash and dust in a nuclear mushroom cloud! When I do the silver tree I use a less concentrated solution of silver nitrate (about 0.1 molar) and it makes larger crystals which reflect more light.
How'd you condense the chlorine Hawkguy? I've used dry ice in acetone with some success for that in the past. Don't use styrofoam Hehe.


[Edited on 9-2-2015 by Molecular Manipulations]


I used the dry ice freezing mixture too, but I'm trying to adapt it to used propane or butane evaporation... Much more OTC..
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quantumcorespacealchemyst
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[*] posted on 11-2-2015 at 21:34


Does anyone know what the possible reactions going on in the arsenic ore dissolution are?
The Realgar As4s4 and Orpiment As2S3 seem to be the main parts of some ore, where AsO3 and even elemental Arsenic seem to be in other types.


I don't know about the pentoxide or supposed Arsenic dioxide, which Wikipedia says is a mixed valent compound of AS(iii) and AS(v).

Does HCl displace Sulphur? Can NO3 make nitrates? There doesn't seem to be much Arsenic chemistry here. I may have not found it yet. Nonetheless, the chemical working of Arsenic seems to be tough to find out about (besides analysis, Marsh test stuff).
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[*] posted on 12-2-2015 at 04:31


There is a good reason for the low abundance of arsenic chemistry on this site. It is way too toxic to do anything more than the most basic things. Heating it, bubbling gas through arsenic-containing solutions, reducing it with strong reductors, they all are a no-go if you value your health. It is surprising that arsenic-containing chemicals can be obtained so easily (especially As4S4 and As2S3), but to a lesser extent also FeSAs.



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[*] posted on 12-2-2015 at 04:37


I made a video of tin crystals growing by electrolysis in real time,
I think it's pretty. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G1sq4hnrBgM
(I don't know how to copy it here)
After the video I just put the tin and electrolyte (HCl + SnCl2) in a beaker,
and stirred it to remake tin chloride ready for another run.

If not for the HCl it could make a nice re-usable toy.

[Edited on 12-2-2015 by Sulaiman]
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morganbw
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[*] posted on 12-2-2015 at 04:57


@Sulaiman
I liked that
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quantumcorespacealchemyst
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[*] posted on 12-2-2015 at 06:06


arsenic is only dangerous if the reactions and behaviour are unknown. chemistry at it's core deals with dangerous materials in a safe manner. lack of information is the real danger.
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[*] posted on 12-2-2015 at 07:28


The question is what you want to do with it. I only made the Arsenic Acid because I always wanted to have that particular compound. There is a quite large variety of Arsenic Salts but I don't really know what to do with them. Your Sulfides belong to the few one that are even colored. So I'd rather keep them as they are...
I have some Sodium Arsenide and Arsenate but they just stand around as white powders and don't have any use for me. I worked with Arsenic at the university last semester where I had to find out whether it was in a given sample. So I did some testing with the Arsenic Compounds we had in our university lab. There are some interesting reactions with arsenic. There was a really efficient way to reduce it to the metal with the help of KCN that ended with a black sponge of metal in my testtube - I even managed to get an Arsenic mirror on the walls but that's pretty much all of it.

And I also have some bad memories on arsenic. A collegue gave me some testtubes to clean since I was cleaning mine and didn't tell me what was in it. Unfortunately it was conc. Sulphuric Acid with Arsenic(III)oxide in it. If he told me that there was acid in it I wouldn't have added water to it. The next thing I felt was boiling arsenic contaminated sulphuric acid running over my hand immediately leaving a red trail where it went.

Took like 3 weeks to fully heal. So I'm not really a fan of Aernic either.
Not because of it's toxicity but rather because of it's uses.


To add something to the thread: Here is some Cobalt(II)chloride (waterfree) dissolved in some absolute Ethanol. If you don't have water
in it you get a blue solution in stead of a pink one. Tried it with Nickel(II)chloride, too. This will leave you with a yellow solution but it's not that good.



Blau.jpg - 36kB
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quantumcorespacealchemyst
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[*] posted on 12-2-2015 at 12:18


i worked out a theoretical equation of the action of nitric and hydrochloric acid on As4S4, realgar.

4HNO3 + As4S4 ---> 4HAsO + 4S + 4NO2
4HNO3 + As4S4 + 8HCl ---> 4HAsCl2 + 4S + 4NO2 + 4H2O
i don't know if that is likely to occur, the second equation mostly.
i guessed that Cl- is more attracted to the molecule (if it exists), being more basic than O-2, which seems to be more acidic and displaced easier.

i have seen a picture http://www.mindat.org/min-2328.html of a sulphur/selenium containing mineral, looks amazing.
and take a look at this (if you will), it looks like fiber optic cables http://www.mindat.org/min-4232.html.


edit: wrong link,fixed, also it doesn't seem HAsO and HAsCl2 are likely to form/exist.

Yvonite Cu(HAsO4) · 2H2O
http://www.mindat.org/min-7382.html

[Edited on 12-2-2015 by quantumcorespacealchemyst]
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quantumcorespacealchemyst
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[*] posted on 12-2-2015 at 13:06


www.mindat.org/min-4195.html
http://www.mindat.org/min-39333.html
http://www.mindat.org/min-3503.html
http://www.mindat.org/min-240.html

[Edited on 12-2-2015 by quantumcorespacealchemyst]
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[*] posted on 12-2-2015 at 17:06


Quote: Originally posted by Sulaiman  
I made a video of tin crystals growing by electrolysis in real time,
I think it's pretty. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G1sq4hnrBgM
(I don't know how to copy it here)
After the video I just put the tin and electrolyte (HCl + SnCl2) in a beaker,
and stirred it to remake tin chloride ready for another run.

If not for the HCl it could make a nice re-usable toy.

[Edited on 12-2-2015 by Sulaiman]

That is AWESOME.
I now know how I am going to show tin in my element display.
J.
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[*] posted on 12-2-2015 at 17:07


I recently made some iodine monochloride; here's some pictures from that ... adventure ... as the trichloride began to form and solidify. The last one is ~800x taken through the glass with a USB microscope. I kept thinking how the flask looked like a gas giant like Jupiter:

ICL_small_1.jpg - 83kB ICL_small_2.jpg - 93kB 2015-02-08-181015.jpg - 36kB





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[*] posted on 12-2-2015 at 21:59


[Et4N]3[Fe(SCN)6] complex I made today. The cristals are a very very dark green and when you crush them they become Red, which is a very rare thing. It has something to do with a difference in energy depending on the size of the cristals, I didn't look in details for the explaination, i,m very tired from my day. Anyway, enjoy :p

10966773_525631770912900_655408890_n.jpg - 89kB10962246_525631774246233_591652556_n.jpg - 101kB




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[*] posted on 13-2-2015 at 07:21


Wow that looks interesting. I didn't know that property even existed.

Edit: Just tried that compound suggested in this thread
http://www.sciencemadness.org/talk/viewthread.php?tid=48176


After 5 min of gently heating and then letting it cool for about 10 min. I got that. Pretty satisfying how easy that went and how good the result looks.

All credits go to woelen who presented that compound first !



Golden Crystals.jpg - 59kB

[Edited on 13-2-2015 by fluorescence]
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[*] posted on 13-2-2015 at 09:12


Nice pictures! Could the crystals of the "[Et4N]3[Fe(SCN)6]" complex you made have oxidized? does the crushed powder show any signs of change? If not, that's amazing!



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[*] posted on 13-2-2015 at 15:06


The color change happens at the second you crush the crystals and no sign of oxidation is present. I'm gonna try to find an explanation.
Edit: I've done some research and nothing, I've only seen the compound and this property listed in an article from 2013, but no explanation. It seems it's a quite rare phenomenon and it hasn't been investigated much yet.

[Edited on 13-2-2015 by alexleyenda]




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[*] posted on 13-2-2015 at 16:50


I'm just going to make a simplified guess, and say it is a property of light diffraction in the crystalline structure vs the crushed state'.

Similar to lead crystal vs crushed.

With no oxidation or further interaction of compounds I don't see any other viable explanation.

[Edited on 14-2-2015 by Zombie]




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[*] posted on 15-2-2015 at 08:36


I have been playing around with my PBr3 which I made a few years ago, see http://www.sciencemadness.org/talk/viewthread.php?tid=17228#... .
I have made nice collector's samples of some very rare compounds:

PBr3: http://woelen.homescience.net/science/chem/compounds/phospho...
PBr5: http://woelen.homescience.net/science/chem/compounds/phospho...
PBr7: http://woelen.homescience.net/science/chem/compounds/phospho...

Some time ago, I also added 200 mg of C60 (fullerene) to my element collection. I put some CS2 and C60 in an ampoule and keep this as another sample for my collection of compounds:

C60: http://woelen.homescience.net/science/chem/compounds/carbon....




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[*] posted on 15-2-2015 at 10:10


Wow, great pictures as usual, woelen. I would have never expected that fullerenes would even dissolve, much less make such colorful solutions! Really fascinating stuff.



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[*] posted on 15-2-2015 at 11:29


That C60 is beautiful Woelens! I'm going to try and see what those nanotubes I got as samples recently look like in CS2 also, I wonder if the color will be similar or none at all? Haven't researched much but Wikipedia (not the best source) does indicate some sort of solubility.



Note to self: Tare the damned flask.
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[*] posted on 16-2-2015 at 14:29


Where did you purchase the fullerenes? Good price tags on 'em.



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[*] posted on 17-2-2015 at 22:10
Potassium hexacyanochromate


Hello everyone,

if someone´s interested in chromium compounds there is one that is really hard to get in its pure form. Yields up to 10%. You can find the whole synthesis here -> K3[Cr(CN)6]

<img src="http://chem.pieceofscience.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/hexacyanochromate.jpg" width="900" height="600" alt="Computer Hope">

<img src="http://chem.pieceofscience.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/hexacyanidochromate-II.jpg" width="900" height="600" alt="Computer Hope">





Please visit our webpage full of great chemistry experiments and photos! We are also looking for editors, do not mind to contact us! http://www.pieceofscience.com !
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[*] posted on 17-2-2015 at 22:20


Quote: Originally posted by woelen  
I have been playing around with my PBr3 which I made a few years ago, see http://www.sciencemadness.org/talk/viewthread.php?tid=17228#... .
I have made nice collector's samples of some very rare compounds:

PBr3: http://woelen.homescience.net/science/chem/compounds/phospho...
PBr5: http://woelen.homescience.net/science/chem/compounds/phospho...
PBr7: http://woelen.homescience.net/science/chem/compounds/phospho...

Some time ago, I also added 200 mg of C60 (fullerene) to my element collection. I put some CS2 and C60 in an ampoule and keep this as another sample for my collection of compounds:

C60: http://woelen.homescience.net/science/chem/compounds/carbon....


Lovely Picts. and write up.




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[*] posted on 18-2-2015 at 12:29


I bet they would (The Cr(III) and Co(III) complexes mentioned here and on his site, respectively) would make great indicators for metal ions, and selective precipitation salts.



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[*] posted on 19-2-2015 at 17:07


A little classic :p I managed to get my hands on AgNO3 for the first time :D

agno3.jpg - 70kB




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[*] posted on 19-2-2015 at 18:47


Is that the one they call the silver tree?

How fragile is that? Dust? Powder?




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